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Thread: Battery Platforms (22/36/40V etc.)

  1. #1
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    Dec 2017
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    Battery Platforms (22/36/40V etc.)

    Good Day Folks,

    I know this may open, if indirectly, the color preference can of worms however quite curious on what/if theres a consensus and the opinions on the matter so here goes.

    With Makita XGT 40(36)V, Hikoki/Metabo HPT MultiVolt 36V, US Flex 24V,Hilti 22V, etc. , more and more Manufacturers seem to be hopping on the higher voltage train Battery Platforms. Now with more and more "regular" tools like drills, impact drivers and so on being released on said higher voltage platforms, are they the way to go now or just making batteries heavier and bulkier?

    Not accounting for tools like Angle Grinders, Rotary Hammers, Chainsaws, Gardening Tools etc. which definitely do benefit from more power, e.g. Dewalt's 54/60V.

    Personally on the Jobsite the potential extra power and or runtime could come in useful and handy though for applications like working overhead im not sure you really want more bulk and weight. Private use running your Drill, Driver on the same Batteries as your Hedge Trimmer, Weed Trimmer does sound rather convenient though the extra cost, depending on brand, might be a deal breaker.

    So as already alluded to, whats your take on the matter? 18V still plenty good? as Milwaukee seems to think. Worth buying into for people newly buying into a Cordless Platform or even worth switching over from 18V ?

    Regards Philipp.

  2. #2
    I've wondered this same thing. Only thing I have higher than 18v is a pole saw which is 40v. I do have a blower, weed whacker and chainsaw that all work very well and I'm impressed with their torque and power, they are all Milwaukee 18v. The chainsaw does require the 12ah battery to shine for a long period of time. Milwaukee seems to be doing something right to get what they are out of 18v. Bottom line though, I'm not a Milwaukee fan boy and might be missing something by sticking with 18v but they work well for me and I am very happy with one battery system and one charger that will charge my 12v & 18v tools from the drill/drivers, circular saw, sawzall, yard tools etc.

  3. #3
    If I was going to go all cordless for yard work, I think I would prefer the bigger battery platforms for longer run time. However for tools like drills and the like I’m fine with 18v. I think the biggest thing is sticking with 1 platform.

  4. #4
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    Based on my age(arthritis), the amount, and kind of work I've been doing, 12v is plenty good for me.

  5. #5
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    Some tools need to work harder and more continuously than other tools. That's where there's going to be a larger benefit to the higher voltage and/or dual battery setups. They are coming along because the trades are really eating up using battery powered equipment across the board where they can including things like portable table saws, miter saws, etc. So actual use intention really matters, IMHO. For many things hand-held, the typical 18-20v tool is going to offer the best combination of power vs weight. The good news there is that technology marches on and it's become possible to get more amp-hour out of a physically smaller battery pack. That's easier on the arms for sure.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
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    Wayland, MA
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    For drills and drivers I find the 18V Li-ion tools to be completely adequate. I find myself opting for the smaller battery packs these days because I appreciate the reduced weight. They charge so fast that even for fairly intensive tasks it's possible to swap between two packs and work continuously.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
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    Cincinnati, Ohio
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    724
    Depends. I really think you need to know what you're going to do with the tool before you buy it.

    I bought DeWalt's 60V circular saw because at the time all the other cordless tools were not the standard 7 1/4" blade. I believe that has since changed. For a lot of other tools it's more a question of longer run time, which might or might not be necessary for your application. Personally I like the move to dual batteries, like the DeWalt cordless lawn mower over the large 40/60V battery packs with fewer applications.

    Finally I think 12V deserves some discussion. I've got Bosch's 12V drill/driver and it's all the power I need. I have yet to run into a situation where I really need to switch to my 20V dewalt set. That having been said, the chuck on the Bosch drill is terrible. I might need the DeWalt 20V impact for taking off lug nuts.

  8. #8
    I have some of the DeWalt 12V, 20V and 60V. They all work fine. The big difference is weight. For my cordless leaf blower, I need the 60V. For most shop tools, the 20V work fine. When weight and fatigue is considered, I bring out the 12V tools. For example, I had a situation where I had to drill a bunch of holes and then put in a screw in each hole, in an awkward position. The 12V tools were best for that.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2018
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    Lancaster, Ohio
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    Like Mike I have the Dewalt 12v, 18v, 20v and 60v. I prefer the 12v in the shop and around the house. 18v and now 20v at work and for larger, heavier projects at home. Tho probably will get a 12v drill and driver at work before school starts back. 60v is very nice and only way to go when you definitely need power.
    If I wasn't so tied to the DeWalt line, I would be looking hard at some of the others that use two batteries for heavier items in place of one 60v.
    Contractors here stated that they were required to use all battery powered tools on extensive school remodel/rebuild. Only saw corded jack hammers in use.
    Ron

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    Columbus, OH
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    181
    I'm in the Makita system, and I'm very happy with the 18x2 36V tools. I've got a 36V power head that runs my string trimmer and a pole saw, and I'll probably end up with one of their 36V chainsaws too at some point. I'm a big fan of being able to use the same batteries across the platform - 2 drill batteries can run the string trimmer and when I'm done with yardwork I have enough batteries to keep one in each tool while working instead of having to swap them out.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    Pittsburgh, PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philipp Jaindl View Post
    Good Day Folks,

    I know this may open, if indirectly, the color preference can of worms however quite curious on what/if theres a consensus and the opinions on the matter so here goes.

    With Makita XGT 40(36)V, Hikoki/Metabo HPT MultiVolt 36V, US Flex 24V,Hilti 22V, etc. , more and more Manufacturers seem to be hopping on the higher voltage train Battery Platforms. Now with more and more "regular" tools like drills, impact drivers and so on being released on said higher voltage platforms, are they the way to go now or just making batteries heavier and bulkier?

    Not accounting for tools like Angle Grinders, Rotary Hammers, Chainsaws, Gardening Tools etc. which definitely do benefit from more power, e.g. Dewalt's 54/60V.

    Personally on the Jobsite the potential extra power and or runtime could come in useful and handy though for applications like working overhead im not sure you really want more bulk and weight. Private use running your Drill, Driver on the same Batteries as your Hedge Trimmer, Weed Trimmer does sound rather convenient though the extra cost, depending on brand, might be a deal breaker.

    So as already alluded to, whats your take on the matter? 18V still plenty good? as Milwaukee seems to think. Worth buying into for people newly buying into a Cordless Platform or even worth switching over from 18V ?

    Regards Philipp.
    I'm only a hobbyist/home DIYer, but I've found the DeWalt FlexVolt comes in handy occasionally. I have the FlexVolt hammer drill and grinder, and while I can just use the standard 20V batteries in them for the vast majority of things, it has been helpful to put a bigger battery for some projects (both power and runtime).

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Varley View Post
    I'm only a hobbyist/home DIYer, but I've found the DeWalt FlexVolt comes in handy occasionally. I have the FlexVolt hammer drill and grinder, and while I can just use the standard 20V batteries in them for the vast majority of things, it has been helpful to put a bigger battery for some projects (both power and runtime).
    I agree. I have occasionally put my 60V FlexVolt battery in a 20V tool when I want to have a lot of runtime. Nice, but very heavy.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    Michigan
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    Question - isnít run time more based on the AH rating of the batteries vs voltage ?

  14. #14
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    Nov 2006
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    N.E. Ohio
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    Makita 18V had/has the best selection of tools that I used so that's what I went with.
    My days of cordless use are rapidly coming to an end though.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    Pittsburgh, PA
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    152
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Colombo View Post
    Question - isn’t run time more based on the AH rating of the batteries vs voltage ?
    Yes, that is true. The 20V DeWalt batteries come in 2/3/4/5/6/8/10 AH. But all of mine are 2 or 5.

    The 20v/60V are 6/9/12/15 AH. For bigger tools, the 12/15 makes sense. For hand tools like the grinder and hammer drill the 6/9 are about as big as reasonable, imo (based on ergonomics).

    So instead of buying the bigger 20V batteries, I just use the larger 20/60V batteries, which also provide more power (on tools built to take advantage of it). But if you don't have any of those, makes sense to just buy the larger 20V batteries.
    Last edited by Patrick Varley; 05-30-2022 at 2:07 PM.

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