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Thread: Power feeder position with outboard shaper fence

  1. #1

    Power feeder position with outboard shaper fence

    I want to set up an outboard fence for my shaper to make some moldings. This is the first I have done this but I am aware of the dangers of kickback. I plan to use my power feeder but am not sure how to position it. Normally I position my feeder so there are two wheels behind the center of the cutter head and one in front to ensure there is always support while the cutter is in contact with the wood. Of course, with the outboard fence this is not possible, and it looks as though I have to choose putting the feeder on the infeed side of the cutter head or on the outfeed side. The opposite feed side could be held with a feather board. I am looking for input as to what others have done, and if possible some pictures. Any advice is most welcome.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Fulford View Post
    I want to set up an outboard fence for my shaper to make some moldings. This is the first I have done this but I am aware of the dangers of kickback. I plan to use my power feeder but am not sure how to position it. Normally I position my feeder so there are two wheels behind the center of the cutter head and one in front to ensure there is always support while the cutter is in contact with the wood. Of course, with the outboard fence this is not possible, and it looks as though I have to choose putting the feeder on the infeed side of the cutter head or on the outfeed side. The opposite feed side could be held with a feather board. I am looking for input as to what others have done, and if possible some pictures. Any advice is most welcome.
    Why is it not possible to straddle the cutterhead?

    When possible I run moldings with an inboard fence starting with a wide board, ripping to dimension after molding the edge. If the profile and available stock dictate running individual blanks an outboard fence can work to eliminate snipe. As long as there is a continuous surface for the powerfeed wheels to bear on there should be no problem.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Wheel location is the same, inboard or outboard fence. Only the angle of the feeder direction changes.

    There is no reason you can't keep 2 wheels behind the cutter and run a outboard fence.

  4. #4
    I must be missing somhere because I do not see how my feeder can straddle the cutterhead. I would really like to see some pictures of the setuup. I have done a search on the internet but have not found anything.

  5. #5
    Cabinet Door Part Shaper Set Up Detail - YouTube 6:13

    Can you describe or show a picture of what is preventing you from setting up your power feed in this situation? The setup is essentially the same as with an inboard fence. I too feel I am missing something. Sorry, I don't have any photos at hand.

  6. #6
    Perhaps making it through some of the videos in this album will help. Thank you, David Best!

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidp...n/photostream/

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Here is a typical outside fence in my shop for running 3 thick window parts. 4 wheel feeder 2 wheels each side of shaft. When using the 3 wheel feeder on another shaper two on the infeed and one on the outfeed.
    Im wondering if you have your fence on the wrong side of shaft?
    7C243355-4538-4C17-9EBE-9AAC18185398.jpg
    CD165FDA-9090-41B0-AA4B-DF93BD43CC96.jpg

  8. #8
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  9. #9
    The difference I see in these videos is the stock is laying flat and the profile cut is on the edge of the stock so there is room to run the feeder on the top of the stock. I am Making 3 1/2" crown molding, cutting the face of the stock so it needs to be run vertically through the cutterhead.

  10. #10
    This is the setup I have been using but it only works if the profile leaves full thickness top and bottom. I can leave stock oversize and cut to size after profiling but my stock was not wide enough to allow for that this time. I will post a picture as soon as I figure out how to do it on this site. I don't see the option.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
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    I shaped the check rails on sash with an outboard fence. The stock feeder was sideways. Th middle wheel of a three wheel feeder had to be removed. The cutter was small, solid body with brazed on carbide on a 3/4" spindle. The advantage was that the check rails ended up being sized accurately when the sash thickness varied/ (don't ask why.)

    This set up required putting the shaper fence outboard. I had to drill some holes to do that.

    One big advantage was being able to climb cut Cherry sash check rails, which can be prone to tear out.

    Given the difficulty in running crown molding on a shaper, I have a molding place make it now. I don't have a molder.

  12. #12
    Here is the setup I used to make the profile in the picture. The problem is that there is nothing for the top of the profile to rest against the fence.20220529_120123.jpg20220529_130231.jpg

  13. #13
    That's a horse of a different color. In that case you would have to use an inboard fence as you show with a packing piece tacked to the outfeed to keep the piece upright after the cut, or a tall outboard fence with the feeder on one side of the cutter and a featherboard on the other. Or outsource it, as William said.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Crowns and bed moulding are difficult to run with a outboard fence. If they are thick it can be done with the feeder on top. These are better done on a moulder or W&H type moulder.
    They can be run with a subfence attached to the main fence. Not ideal and most likely to get some snipe. Snipe on linear moulding can be cut out though.
    The profile shown would be better run fat side down but unfortunately the design of the cutter does not allow for that.
    EFE53ACA-8C6C-4348-B736-5DE082A93E87.jpg
    BE3EB8D7-576F-45E2-BAC8-978C959AA89A.jpg
    Last edited by Joe Calhoon; 05-29-2022 at 2:40 PM.

  15. #15
    I'm not understanding what you are intending to do with the back fence. Do you have a copy oof Stephenson's book "Spindle Moulder Handbook?" He covers the set up for cutting crown moulding on page 115 and 116.

    Perhaps if you posted a photo of your cutters and your profiling sequence we (or at least I) might have a better idea what you are attempting to do and what the precise nature of the problem is you are confronting.

    Mike

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