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Thread: new bandsaw wont' cut straight

  1. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    Agreed, in fact many saws have locating dowels for the table so alignment is built in.

    The blade will cut parallel to the fence and the mitre slot until the blade needs replacing.

    This method of alignment is crucial for ripping, cutting tenons or bridle joints or cross cutting.

    People are always amazed when I hold band saw courses how accurate and repeatable a good saw is.

    If I had to realign my sawmill every time I changed blades it would be heading for the scrap dealer…..Rod
    Why do you want the fence parallel to the miter slot and the table aligned to the blade? Because you can use the fence and the miterslot to build all sorts of jigs to do incredible things with the bandsaw. Or you can buy a fence with drift adjustment or align the fence to the blade and use it for ripping and resawing, likely hamstringing the capabilities of the tool.

    Watch Michael Fortune with all of his jigs and you will see how to use a bandsaw in ways that create productivity and repeatability in your work.

    https://www.finewoodworking.com/proj...ichael-fortune

    Mike

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
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    576
    Agree with Mike. A properly tuned band saw will not need any drift compensation. Most drift is either table relate (loosen bolts under the trunion, Michael Fortune's video covers this well, where the viewer watches the blade pull the wood away from the fence on an improperly adjusted table) or is related to the where the blade runs on the upper tire (forward of center, it will drift right, rear of center, it will drift left). This is all covered with a great, clear demonstration, Tuning a Bandsaw for the Anally Retentive. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9DzbJYIPPNE
    Regards,

    Tom

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    767
    Here is a link to a recent (2 weeks old) livestream on YouTube from Fine Woodworking using Michael Fortune's methods for correcting problems on a bandsaw; really essentially setup. It follows an article he did in Fine Woodworking (Issue #173). I did not watch all of it as it is over an hour long. I am assuming that his methods differ from Alex Snodgrass's methods, but both work. Neither would use them if they didn't.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_pyuzOhzd4

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
    Posts
    576
    I watched a portion of the video linked by Randy, at about 51m, and he confirms that drift like the OP saw happening, occurs only when the back of the blade is askew and touches the sides of the kerf, either due to a misaligned table or the blade being un-centered along the top of the top tire. This is exactly what Fortune, Snodgrass and the anally retentive video I previously linked. Assuming one's blades are properly aligned and the table is properly set, there is no inherent drift.
    Regards,

    Tom

  5. #50
    There are always two things to consider, the saw and the blade.
    I don't agree with you that a properly tuned saw needs no drift compensation. This is only true if all blades are the same, perfect and always run true.
    They are not and therefore must be tuned (adjusted) to track properly. This is why bandsaws have a built in, easily accessible alignment/tracking feature.
    Tune your saw, get everything properly aligned but when you change from one blade to another you may still (and should IMO) check the alignment with the built in tracking adjustment, that's what it's there for. It is not simply a one and done device for getting your blade to run in the center of the wheel.

    I feel too many people don't quite grasp what the tracking does and why it's there. That's Just my opion

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
    Posts
    576
    I agree with Edward and every saw needs to blade needs to be adjusted to track. But the point of the numerous videos is that a properly adjusted saw table and blade should not per se have any drift. Yes, if you grab the saw and move it around the shop by its two so-called "front handles," it is likely that the table will go out of whack. And yes, if you change blades, those new blades have to be adjusted to track correctly on the upper tire.


    Delta Bandsaw.jpg
    Regards,

    Tom

  7. #52
    Thanks to everyone who posted in this thread. I learned some valuable information from it.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

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