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Thread: Miter Saw Vertical Cuts not Square

  1. #16
    Checking the alignment as in the photo only shows where the blade ends up after the cut has been made. Unfortunately, it would seem that the blade isn't tracking at a perfect 90 degrees, only ending up there..
    It almost seems as if something is twisted or as you mentioned " that the hinge pivot casting is not parallel to the blade spindle casting." to account for the cuts you're getting.
    Sometimes you just get a lemon, if it can't be adjusted to the point where it cuts reliably, I would have to let it go and stop chasing a problem that can't be fixed.

  2. #17
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    Still very confused. Place one side of a framing square along the left fence on one side; and use the other side of the framing square against the sliding blade. Slide the saw back and forth against the square. It is either square or not square along the whole axis as you slide the blade back and forth.

    So is it square as you slide the saw back and forth the whole 11 inches?
    Regards,

    Tom

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Weber View Post
    Checking the alignment as in the photo only shows where the blade ends up after the cut has been made. Unfortunately, it would seem that the blade isn't tracking at a perfect 90 degrees, only ending up there..
    It almost seems as if something is twisted or as you mentioned " that the hinge pivot casting is not parallel to the blade spindle casting." to account for the cuts you're getting.
    Sometimes you just get a lemon, if it can't be adjusted to the point where it cuts reliably, I would have to let it go and stop chasing a problem that can't be fixed.
    I think this is the case, it is not tracking at a perfect 90 degrees, only ends up there, and when I check it with a longer combination square, it doesn't end up square at the down position. I think this may be why I get some burning in my cuts because it doesn't track at 90 degrees but follows an angle.

    Thomas- When I square the blade to the fence (from side to side) it is square. The problem is it is not square vertically and follows an angle as it lowers.

    Sounds like I may have to give it up

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Sotelo View Post
    I think this is the case, it is not tracking at a perfect 90 degrees, only ends up there, and when I check it with a longer combination square, it doesn't end up square at the down position. I think this may be why I get some burning in my cuts because it doesn't track at 90 degrees but follows an angle.

    Thomas- When I square the blade to the fence (from side to side) it is square. The problem is it is not square vertically and follows an angle as it lowers.

    Sounds like I may have to give it up
    Has it ever been dropped or fallen over? I would guess the hinge pin that allows it to swing down is bent.
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USN(Ret)

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  5. #20
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Sotelo View Post
    I think this is the case, it is not tracking at a perfect 90 degrees, only ends up there, and when I check it with a longer combination square, it doesn't end up square at the down position. I think this may be why I get some burning in my cuts because it doesn't track at 90 degrees but follows an angle.

    Thomas- When I square the blade to the fence (from side to side) it is square. The problem is it is not square vertically and follows an angle as it lowers.

    Sounds like I may have to give it up
    Got it. At this point, it is not a matter of adjustment, the saw is buggered. I would either sell it for parts or send to an authorized service center who can properly diagnose the defective part and replace it.
    Regards,

    Tom

  6. #21
    If that is the old style of Hitachi with the rails in the back and not the front, that is a very well respected saw. If it were me, I would take it to a machine shop and have them machine the castings correctly to fix it once and for all. I would most definitely not attempt it yourself. So donít go at it with a grinder or anything else. Take it to get done precisely and accurately so that when you get it back you will have the best miter saw on the planet not named OMGA or CTD.

  7. #22
    I have a Hitachi c10FSH. It has been a very good saw with some limitations like the limited height to cut baseboard standing up. I had some issues with mine not always cutting square despite spending hours with squares and dial indicators. Turns out the bearings/bushings that surround the sliding rods had gotten loose. There is an adjustment at the back of the casting that holds the sliding tubes. I am not sure if that could be contributing to your problem, but it is worth checking.

  8. #23
    Lee- I myself have never dropped it but I was wondering about this, when I took out the pin, it looks straight as an arrow when put against an edge and rolled. It also fits nicely into the hinge area.

    Bobby- This is I believe the gen I C10FS saw, with the rails in the back. From what else I had seen online I thought it was a pretty darn good saw, but if a saw doesn't cut straight, is it really a good saw ha? I am leaning towards taking it in to a shop to machine it right, only hiccup is if it is machined down more around the motor housing area (where I would assume it would have to be?) then I am wondering if the spindle would not sit in the housing correctly because it would be too tight. Although maybe the hinge could be machined to match the housing, and then just a shim used to take up the space? Just spit balling my thoughts here.

    Dennis- I had thought about this and took it apart and adjusted the bushing tightness so there is no play, but I don't think that is the problem because when I slide it all the way back and lock the slide, it still does it, so I think the rails are eliminated from the problem, unless I am mistaken.

    It sounds like my next step is to take it to a hitachi repair shop or machine shop. I am truly grateful for the numerous responses!

    -Matt

  9. #24
    Pictures of the saw:

    IMG-4716.jpgIMG-4717.jpg

  10. #25
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    Is that a miter saw blade? The teeth look like they have a lot of hook the blade will self feed it has forward rake or hook
    Aj

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Hughes View Post
    Is that a miter saw blade? The teeth look like they have a lot of hook the blade will self feed it has forward rake or hook
    It's just a cheap spyder brand blade, the only full kerf blade I could find, framing blade, 40t, 18 degree hook. I know it's not an ideal blade, just tried it for the full kerf to see about any deflection. I could try a higher tooth, low degree blade if you think that would help?

  12. #27
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    Itís good practice to have the right blade for the intended use. I use the Forrest chop master and Iíve also used Amana tools blades. All full 1/8. If I were cutting MDF crown molding I would use the that blade you have. Then throw in the trash when I was done.
    For cutting solid woods sharp wins every time.
    Good Luck
    Aj

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