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Thread: Options for Harvey Table Saw?

  1. #1
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    Options for Harvey Table Saw?

    I've been away from woodworking for about ten years while I was restoring a car. It was something wanted to do since I was a kid and I finally got it done.

    Now I want to get back into woodworking and I will need a new table saw. I had been using a hot-rodded Craftsman contractor saw. It got the job done, but I'm ready for something more spiffy. I've been looking at the Harvey table saws and I'm very interested. I saw a review here by a woman who recently bought a Harvey saw and I like what she had to say.

    When looking at the Harvey saws online, I see they have many options for sizes and power levels. So...

    - What would you folks recommend for saw horsepower? I think horsepower ratings for air compressors are mostly hype, but I'm not sure about table saw horsepower

    - Do you think the router table option would be worthwhile? I really like using my table saw as a router table. (Yes, I'm a David Marks fan.)

    - I would like the saw to be mobile, but I'm not sure if the router extension would negate that

    - Any other suggestions?

    I'm willing to spend money on options that would be a good value, but I don't want to pony up for things I likely won't use or that won't work well.

    Thanks!
    If the water is 100 feet down, it doesn't matter how many 90 foot wells you dig.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
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    Cincinnati, Ohio
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    697
    Buy the SawStop and keep your fingers, simple as that. If people who have been operating table saws for decades like Jimmy Diresta can hurt themselves, you're unlikely to be any different.

  3. #3
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    Always nice to hear from the SawStop contingent.
    If the water is 100 feet down, it doesn't matter how many 90 foot wells you dig.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2021
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    Lake Orion, MI
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    Both the 2hp & 3hp Harvey table saws are at excellent prices - you managed to save your fingers using that hot rodded Craftsman, you will be fine on a Harvey saw. Don't let the BIG FEAR scam of Sawstop bring you down. All saw blades should be treated with respect, keeping your fingers away should be zero problem.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Waterford, PA
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    Depending on the type of woodworking you'll be doing, I think a 3 HP saw is the sweet spot. My rodded Craftsman had 1.5 on it and it would bog down ripping. I then had a 3 HP Grizzly Cabinet Saw and never had a problem with cuts in solid hardwoods. I now have a 3 HP Slider, and it also has no problems with bog. I think it is more important to keep sharp, quality, purpose-specific blades in your arsenal than have a ton of HP.

    If you like having a router table in your saw, by all means go with the option from Harvey. I've had them both ways and prefer a separate router table, but that's just my own preference.

  6. #6
    you don't say what you are planning on doing . Large outdoor projects with 4x4's? Kumiko? Small boxes? Hard to answer without that info. But I have a 2hsp. and with good blades, I can do most anything . I like my router table on my saw, because i use my fence for both. But on the harvey you have to use 2 fences. I'd find that inconvenient. I also have a router table.
    Be the kind of woman that when your feet hit the ground each morning, the devil says, "oh crap she's up!"


    Tolerance is giving every other human being every right that you claim for yourself.

    "What is man without the beasts? If all the beasts are gone, men would die from great loneliness of spirit. For whatever happens to the beasts will happen to man. All things are connected. " Chief Seattle Duwamish Tribe

  7. #7
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    Good information. Thank you.

    My projects will be over a very wide range; small band saw boxes, indoor furniture and even some outdoor projects for the yard.
    If the water is 100 feet down, it doesn't matter how many 90 foot wells you dig.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Pat Germain View Post
    Always nice to hear from the SawStop contingent.
    Funny how they always seem to pop up with an answer to a question that wasn't asked isn't it?

  9. #9
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    It's all good. I haven't ruled out a SawStop, but right now I'm looking for information about the Harvey.
    If the water is 100 feet down, it doesn't matter how many 90 foot wells you dig.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Michigan
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    223
    I bought the 4hp model, but the 3hp was not available at that time. I had a 3hp Unisaw and had no issues at all with the power. As we have been in the process of building a new house, my saw is still crated at the builders warehouse so I canít comment on how it is, but from looking at it on line and reviews, I am very excited to get it.

    For a mobile base, I bought a Shop Fox one. It offers an extension for the side table so I figure if I find I need it at least I have the option available. Here is a link to it. https://www.grizzly.com/products/shop-fox-heavy-duty-mobile-base/d2057a

    As to Saw Stop, I did look at them but to match the specs of the Harvey (table depth and distance from the front of the table to front of blade for example) you need to go to the SS Industrial version vs SS Professional.

    Doug
    Last edited by Doug Colombo; 05-20-2022 at 4:06 PM. Reason: Spelling correction

  11. #11
    I think most folks will tell you 3hsp. That has been the standard for years and years. For 35 yrs or so I used a delta contractor and made aliving with it. When I thought I needed a new saw, I went with the 2 hsp harvey, as the intro prices were so wonderful. I enjoy my harvey. The delta contractor had a router table on it and a jointech fence, so I could use just one fence for cutting wood and using the router. I have always shied away from using the 2 fence idea as one has to keep taking the router fence off and keep putting it back on.
    Be the kind of woman that when your feet hit the ground each morning, the devil says, "oh crap she's up!"


    Tolerance is giving every other human being every right that you claim for yourself.

    "What is man without the beasts? If all the beasts are gone, men would die from great loneliness of spirit. For whatever happens to the beasts will happen to man. All things are connected. " Chief Seattle Duwamish Tribe

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michelle Rich View Post
    I think most folks will tell you 3hsp. That has been the standard for years and years. For 35 yrs or so I used a delta contractor and made aliving with it. When I thought I needed a new saw, I went with the 2 hsp harvey, as the intro prices were so wonderful. I enjoy my harvey. The delta contractor had a router table on it and a jointech fence, so I could use just one fence for cutting wood and using the router. I have always shied away from using the 2 fence idea as one has to keep taking the router fence off and keep putting it back on.
    Thank you. I think I will look for a 3 horsepower cabinet saw. As I mentioned above, I am also considering a SawStop.
    If the water is 100 feet down, it doesn't matter how many 90 foot wells you dig.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2018
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    Lancaster, Ohio
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    I personally prefer more power in a table saw. Started out with a 1 hp, resin top, arbor moving table saw, then a Delta contractors saw, now have a SawStop ICS 5hp, 36" fence. Have used a Powermatic 5hp at one job and a 3hp Delta Unisaw.
    I find with more power less binding of the saw blade and smoother cutting, MY PERSONAL FEELINGS.
    Don't like or use router tables so no recommendations there.
    Recommend buying all the power you can afford, along with a nice cast iron top that is flat, sent a Jet contractors saw back in 1986 due to over 20 faults with it. Had to argue with the distributor as shop that sold it brand new to me tried to wash hands until credit card company got involved. Bought a Jet jointer a year later AFTER looking it over closely from another seller that was good quality and ran it for 32yrs.
    Never had a chance to examine a Harvey saw but have heard good things about it.
    Consider a sliding table saw, never used one or even heard of one until I came here. Now I would like to have one, however would need to add an addition to the house basement to have enough space for one.
    Good luck, take your time and keep your mind open.
    Ron
    Last edited by Ron Selzer; 05-21-2022 at 11:54 AM.

  14. #14
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Pat, for most folks, the 3hp machine pretty much covers everything they likely would do, regardless of color/label. Adequate power for common thicker materials is there and most of the time, it will be "loafing" along while cutting.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #15
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    On a whim, I did some searching online for used table saws. I'm surprised to see a few 230V Delta Unisaws in very good shape for $1500-$1800. When I got into woodworking in the mid 1990s, the Delta Unisaw was the thing to have. Is this no longer the case?
    If the water is 100 feet down, it doesn't matter how many 90 foot wells you dig.

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