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Thread: Polyaspartic Garage Floor Coating?

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Tymchak View Post
    Have also thought along the same lines for the shop-I-can't-quite-pull-the-trigger-on-yet. Are you thinking of gluing the mat down or letting it float? I'd prefer to float it, but I'm concerned about seams bulging in hot weather when heavy machines and benches keep the mat from being able to move.

    Edit: Or maybe since I intend to have conditioned space, maybe this is a non-issue?
    I haven't studied what's the best practice for seams on the roll-out material, but will have to do that. There may be an appropriate tape product for this...but it has to be suitable for concrete. My space will be conditioned, too.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 05-22-2022 at 7:23 PM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #17
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    I did a DIY epoxy coat in my furnace room. And and industrial coating at work (a manufacturing space).
    At one point I had vinyl tile
    Now have cork

    As your budgets increase so do your options.

    Commercial vinyl tile like in a school hallway was quite durable but slick. The design options were fun. I would not use it again (Oh, and I had some foam interlock tiles from harbor freight that I eventually put over the vinyl tile. imo, it was 'too' soft and squishy - my back ached after working on it for a while. Ironic)

    The DIY epoxy worked 'pretty' well and looked nice. But over years there were some corners/edges that flaked/peeled. I believe it was due to moisture creep coming up from underneath. Note this was a basement/below grade section

    The industrial epoxy was in a dry climate (Texas) and no issues so far. It has grit added, but I do not know how slick it behaves with a layer of sawdust on it. I still have that concern.

    The 1/4" cork underlay (not designed as a finished surface - but I used it for this) I like. I 'lightly glued' it down to keep it in place, and sealed it. I particularly like the acoustics and soft feel/give to it. It stains over time (especially if working on greasy/dirty stuff in the same space). It is TBD how well it holds up over time (one year and counting). But roll it out with some glue, and done. If all I did was woodworking the staining would be much less.

    One option I havent heard but would consider myself in the future is the rubber rolls like that are used in weight rooms at the gym. Its black in color which might not suit everyone. But the give, and acoustics would be favorable. Standing and working on the softer surface not to mention when something is dropped on it, is dramatically improved with a soft flooring.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I haven't studied what's the best practice for seams on the roll-out material, but will have to do that. There may be an appropriate tape product for this...but it has to be suitable for concrete. My space will be conditioned, too.
    Will the roll out vinyl work with machines on a mobile base?
    If the water is 100 feet down, it doesn't matter how many 90 foot wells you dig.

  4. #19
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    In a shop I think you would want full glue down. I used pressure sensitive around the edges and under the washer and dryer area in the laundry. Edge and seam moldings are available. We did not see them and are hoping the pressure sensitive adhesive around the perimeter will work.
    Last edited by Maurice Mcmurry; 05-23-2022 at 9:14 AM.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pat Germain View Post
    Will the roll out vinyl work with machines on a mobile base?
    Yes, it should be fine if put down property. Really tiny wheels for mobility might not be the best choice, but larger ones that are more typical should roll over it just fine. This is purely opinion not based in experience, however...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Yes, it should be fine if put down property. Really tiny wheels for mobility might not be the best choice, but larger ones that are more typical should roll over it just fine. This is purely opinion not based in experience, however...
    Roger that. Thank you.

    I've also seen peel-and-stick vinyl tiles for garage flooring. Wondering if that might be a good option if an area gets worn or damaged. One could simply peel up the bad tile and stick down a new tile.
    If the water is 100 feet down, it doesn't matter how many 90 foot wells you dig.

  7. #22
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    I've never been a real fan of "peel and stick", especially when it comes to durability, particularly with the adhesive. Then again, maybe things have improved with environment specific products. The thing with the big, wide roll-out sheets is that there is a lot of surface area directly in contact with the floor, even without adhesive involved. That alone helps keep things from moving. Add a purpose-specific adhesive or adhesive tape, and that just raises the bar. One alternative product that is worthy of consideration is the interlocking, but thin garage floor tile, such as that used by Caleb of "You Can Make This Too" on the 'Tube. He used Husky brand and it's worked well in his shop. I do not believe he put it under "old iron" major machines, but his are not on wheels, either.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #23
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    Nov 2021
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    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
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    In my garage shop, I am very happy with my bare concrete. It got a heavy coat of Cure And Seal right after final finishing. The Cure And Seal has mostly worn off. The surface is indestructible and things roll almost too well. It does make my feet hurt much more than a day on soil or wood.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maurice Mcmurry View Post
    In my garage shop, I am very happy with my bare concrete. It got a heavy coat of Cure And Seal right after final finishing. The Cure And Seal has mostly worn off. The surface is indestructible and things roll almost too well. It does make my feet hurt much more than a day on soil or wood.
    Same here. After a few years the floor reaches a steady state of stains & paint splatters & never seems to get any worse. It is never slippery and even though it doesn't sweep quite as easily as more finished surfaces, I've taken to vacuuming because that raises way less dust. The only complaint I have is when I drop something sharp and it lands on the pointy end.

    My ideal floor would be site finished hardwood, white oak or maple, sanded to 60 grit and given a couple of coats of a penetrating oil finish.

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