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Thread: Teach us about rasps and floats

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bulatowicz View Post
    I would argue that accurate is a matter of context; I would have had a great deal more trouble with accuracy on the curves of this saw handle using a bench chisel, but perhaps I’m simply lacking in skill. Rasps were highly valuable here; a block plane, not so much.
    Attachment 479581
    Nice saw handle Michael, in fact there are rasps made specifically for stair makers and saw handles. They are likely very handy if one is doing a lot of saw handles or stair railings.

    jtk
    Last edited by Jim Koepke; 05-24-2022 at 11:56 AM. Reason: corrected
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  2. #32
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    Aug 2014
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    Boston, MA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas McCurnin View Post
    I got into a spirited discussion at Homestead Heritage School on the subject of rasps. Contrary to the opinions, here, there are very few tasks suited to a rasp, except for shaping corners, and even with those, they taught us to use chisels, planes, spokeshaves and scrapers and hid the rasps from the students. The notion that a rasp should be used on a dovetail or tenon would send chills down Paul Sellers backside.

    That said, at my home shop I have a couple of the French rasps and still use them, but after weeks of instruction, I somehow feel guilty about doing so. I'm not sure why.
    I should note that Paul Sellers regularly uses a 2-sided Shinto rasp in his project videos for various shaping tasks.

    One of the things that can surprise beginners (like myself) is how quickly a rasp can remove wood. Wouldn't take much for an overzealous student to shrink a tenon or dovetail to oblivion, especially in a softer wood. And the rasp leaves no shaving to glue back on.

  3. #33
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    Apr 2017
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    Clarks Summit PA
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    Interesting discussion on the use of rasps, which is more revealing of the psychology of man then the mechanics of woodworking. Yes, they appear to be rough, brutal, tearing away at wood. And spokeshaves and carving gouges create such fine shavings. Some choose to avoid the violence of the rasp and seek the swoosh of the shaving. At times I have. Some seek to distinguish themselves from others because they avoid rasps. It is the nature of man to distinguish himself from others. Several of the finest hand tool woodworkers of the 21st century found rasps essential, including Gene Landon, Philip Lowe, and Allan Breed. They used them, so will I.

  4. #34
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    Nov 2021
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    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
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    They are a great tool for certain difficult jobs like shaping end grain, dealing with crazy grain around knots, etc. Some how I got started watching various Farriers and The Hoof GP on youTube. It seems the angle grinder is becoming the tool of choice for some Farriers, rather than the rasp.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  5. #35
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    It seems the angle grinder is becoming the tool of choice for some Farriers, rather than the rasp.
    This could simply be due to electricity being more available in places where it wasn't until recently.

    Most newer pick-up trucks provide an electrical outlet for working off the grid.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  6. #36
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    Jun 2015
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    Northern California
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    I have my dadís Nicholson 49 & 50 rasps and about 30 files (not including my rifflers and jewelers), many of which were sharpened by Boggstool. These and sandpaper have always proven acceptable and Iíve never succumbed to the allure of expensive rasps. But since acquiring this https://www.jasonalonontoolmaker.com...pushpull-shave
    I find myself using the rasps, files and sandpaper a lot less.

    Itís an incredible and versatile tool from an excellent and relatively unknown toolmaker. I have no affiliation with Jason, just a very satisfied customer. I discovered him due to another Creeker selling one of his adzes.

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