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Thread: Return Air Baffle for CV1800

  1. #16
    Jamie. I never mentioned it but my plan is to either build a floor standing frame to support the cyclone or utilize cushioned suspension isolators from my ceiling joists directly above. The. Build the closet around the cyclone and frame. Definitely would not want to try handling the cyclone in the closet.

    I have a little time today so Iím going to go back to my 3d model and make some changes. Stay tuned. Thanks for all the input.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan Cleveland View Post
    Jamie. I never mentioned it but my plan is to either build a floor standing frame to support the cyclone or utilize cushioned suspension isolators from my ceiling joists directly above. The. Build the closet around the cyclone and frame. Definitely would not want to try handling the cyclone in the closet.

    I have a little time today so I’m going to go back to my 3d model and make some changes. Stay tuned. Thanks for all the input.
    If you build the closet around the cyclone, can you assemble the closet with screws? I'd hate to build the closet, and then some day down the road need to service the cyclone.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie Buxton View Post
    If you build the closet around the cyclone, can you assemble the closet with screws? I'd hate to build the closet, and then some day down the road need to service the cyclone.
    Very valid question, Jamie. It shouldn't be an issue building things with screws to permit disassembly unless there is a bearing wall involved.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #19
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    I built a return air duct for my 5hp clearvue. Used 1/2Ē plywood, had it extend up into the roof trusses, made several turns and added a couple of baffles to disrupt the sound path. I calculated the air volume and made it oversize to minimize any back pressure possibility. I insulated well around the outside of duct and sprayed a rubber coating everywhere inside. I canít detect significant sound at the exit point in the main shop. With the insulated closet I can hear a whisper outside the closet when running. Sounds like a jet engine inside the closet.

  5. #20
    Yes I will definitely be building with screws. Crappy part is that the bottom plate will either have to be attached to the garage floor with either construction adhesive(not a lot, but enough) or probable tapcons. My foundation is post tension and I was advised by the builder to not drill into the concrete. However I have read that the cables are several inches below and as long as I donít it plastic Iím not close to the cables. I figure a tapcon screw a couple 2-3 inches should be ok.

    George, good thinking. In my design I incorporated a 1Ē cut to size filter. Itís in dark blue behind the expanded metal door Iíll need to build. Itís on hinges and will latches and a foam edge type gasket. I have one like it on the inlet of my mini-split and itís great for catching dust. Should definitely help. Ok so here is the design 2.0 Iíve come up with. What I would not give for another couple feet length and width in the garage. Thereís lots you cannot see that are not easily relocated items in the garage. Gotta work with what I have. I am very thankful to have it. So hit me with it what do yíall think? Is it enough? Oh and the yellow youíll see is 1Ē acoustic fiberglass.

    Thatís was good thinking Jim mentioning exhaust air entering from bottom and not top. Makes perfect sense.

    close to the cables. I figure a tapcon screw a couple 2-3 inches should be ok.

    George, good thinking. In my design I incorporated a 1Ē cut to size filter. Itís in dark blue behind the expanded metal door Iíll need to build. Itís on hinges and will latches and a foam edge type gasket. I have one like it on the inlet of my mini-split and itís great for catching dust. Should definitely help. Ok so here is the design 2.0 Iíve come up with. What I would not give for another couple feet length and width in the garage. Thereís lots you cannot see that are not easily relocated items in the garage. Gotta work with what I have. I am very thankful to have it. So hit me with it what do yíall think? Is it enough? Oh and the yellow youíll see is 1Ē acoustic fiberglass.

    Thatís was good thinking Jim mentioning exhaust air entering from bottom and not top. Makes perfect sense.

    I will definitely be building with screws. Crappy part is that the bottom plate will either have to be attached to the garage floor with either construction adhesive(not a lot, but enough) or probable tapcons. My foundation is post tension and I was advised by the builder to not drill into the concrete. However I have read that the cables are several inches below and as long as I donít it plastic Iím not close to the cables. I figure a tapcon screw a couple 2-3 inches should be ok.

    George, good thinking. In my design I incorporated a 1Ē cut to size filter. Itís in dark blue behind the expanded metal door Iíll need to build. Itís on hinges and will latches and a foam edge type gasket. I have one like it on the inlet of my mini-split and itís great for catching dust. Should definitely help. Ok so here is the design 2.0 Iíve come up with. What I would not give for another couple feet length and width in the garage. Thereís lots you cannot see that are not easily relocated items in the garage. Gotta work with what I have. I am very thankful to have it. So hit me with it what do yíall think? Is it enough? Oh and the yellow youíll see is 1Ē acoustic fiberglass.

    Thatís was good thinking Jim mentioning exhaust air entering from bottom and not top. Makes perfect sense.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #21
    Ok yíall I gotta run. John Iíll get back to you on that. Iím liking the sound of that. Forgot the dimensions. Itís constructed from 1/2Ē mfd. Interior dimensions are 7.5Ē x 68.75Ē x 7Ē. Up where the air makes a u-turn is 9ishĒ over the wall coming out the blue filter which is 7x 70Ē I think. Later yíall. More tomorrow.

  7. #22
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    Bryan,
    A post tension slab?! Wow, Iíve never seen one of those in residential construction. Whatís under your slab? I would definitely not drill into that slab anymore than Iíd drill into a hydronically heated slab.
    Youíll love having your cyclone in a closet. I had mine in an enclosure at my old shop and still havenít built a closet around it in my new shop. The sound kinda makes me crazy by the end of the day!

  8. #23
    Jeff to be honest I have no idea what under the slab. During construction I saw a grid of trenches dug down several feet. 4-5 feet u guess. Inside the grid were large squares covered with tarps. Dirt or something. Then they poured concrete I assume.

    Iíve done a lot of reading. I typically over think things. Actually everything. I do the same with research. Lot of reputable pros in various construction trades have mentioned a special concrete anchor with a drill stop permanently attached that only allows a couple inches or so for just this purpose. I figured an inch or two with a tap on that I can remove at a later date should be ok. However. I think Iíll contact my builder and ask them if Iím safe doing it. If not ok Iíll use construction adhesive. Will take lot more effort to remove but doable.

  9. #24
    I have my dust collector below my shop with just the stairwell as a return. (This is temporary.) When the DC is running, the return flow pushes the door at the top of the stairs open 6 inches or so. That gives a flow area estimate with little back pressure of about 80”x6”. I will be working to get close to that when I put in my return. I have an Oneida Smart Gorilla Pro 5hp.

  10. #25
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    If I'm not mistaken, post-stressed/tensioned slabs have cables in them that are tightened after the pour is cured. I remember seeing that on an episode of the BuildShow on the 'Tube awhile back on a "yuge" residential project...assuming my memory isn't flawed. While I doubt the short fasteners used to anchor a wall to the slab would be an issue, I'd want to check with the experts on that before drilling hole number one.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #26
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    If you do drill into a post tension cable and break it, you'll know right away. Post tension slabs just aren't used anymore in these parts because repairs for corrosion, when (not if) it happens, are extremely expensive. There have been many otherwise good buildings demolished because it was not practical to repair those cables.

  12. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan Cleveland View Post
    Yes I will definitely be building with screws. Crappy part is that the bottom plate will either have to be attached to the garage floor with either construction adhesive(not a lot, but enough) or probable tapcons. My foundation is post tension and I was advised by the builder to not drill into the concrete. However I have read that the cables are several inches below and as long as I don’t it plastic I’m not close to the cables. I figure a tapcon screw a couple 2-3 inches should be ok. ...
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Bartley View Post
    Bryan,
    A post tension slab?! Wow, I’ve never seen one of those in residential construction. What’s under your slab? I would definitely not drill into that slab anymore than I’d drill into a hydronically heated slab.
    ...
    Continuing the hijack, just a little... Slab on grade with post-tension cables (PTCs) is essentially the standard in N.TX, and has been for 30-40yrs now. Early on, the bottom plates were typically attached w/ ramsets, but I'd say 99% are now 'bolted' down w/ wedge anchor's (better resistance to tornado lift, IIRC). Neither method impacts the PTCs. (Mr. Cleveland's description below makes his sound like what would be called a box beam slab here, and PTC's are optional ...depending on all the usual factors.)

    PTCs are simple to repair: I'll spare y'all the lead-up (!plumber!), but last house had a cable break during construction. Most of the cable popped out and was laying in the yard; lubed plastic sheathing was still in the slab. It took a 3-man crew <1 hr to pull the new cable in, stretch it, crimp the ends, and a schmear of grout on slab edge to hide the cable ends.

    Bottom line, I'd place the plate, drill thru and into slab, then insert 3-3.5" wedge anchors (~1.5" in concrete). In case it helps, I've done it several times.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm McLeod View Post
    PTCs are simple to repair: I'll spare y'all the lead-up (!plumber!), but last house had a cable break during construction. Most of the cable popped out and was laying in the yard; lubed plastic sheathing was still in the slab. It took a 3-man crew <1 hr to pull the new cable in, stretch it, crimp the ends, and a schmear of grout on slab edge to hide the cable ends.
    It's a whole other matter in a commercial building where the cables have corroded. It almost always involves excavating the cables at 1 or more placed along the length of the run so they can get the old out and new in. We do a lot of work for 4 different concrete restoration companies that do PTC repairs. They inevitably break into electrical conduits in the slab and we get a call to repair them. It's mostly in parking structures where there is salty run off from the cars.

  14. #29
    Havenít forgotten about this thread. Been super busy. Trying out some designs.

  15. #30
    Think I need some help here. What would be the ideal dimensions for return air flow to exit the closet? Minus insulation.

    I have created around 20 different designs for return air that I eventually shoot down for one reason or another.

    Starting to think I should have just sold the dust collector and bought the G700 from Harvey. Unfortunately itís too late for that as Iíve already spent money to move the mini split over(utilizing the same pass thur hole in the wall).

    I have been working on this closet design for months trying to make it fit my space. This air return is the last piece of the puzzle. I have been trying to stay above 8Ē x 8Ē but with insulation and or baffles it keeps getting bigger and bigger. Blocking access to the filter stack. Any thoughts?

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