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Thread: Lenox Bi-Metal Resaw blade

  1. #1
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    Lenox Bi-Metal Resaw blade

    Has anyone tried a Lenox QXP Bi-Metal resaw blade?

    https://www.lenoxtools.com/Pages/Pro...uctId_QXP.aspx

    It looks alot like a Woodmaster B except with variable 2/3 or 3/4 tooth spacing.
    It is designed for metal but so is the DieMaster and TriMaster.

    Stephen

  2. #2
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    The problem I’ve found with bimetal blades is the gullets are small. For resawing let’s say 6 inches or taller a bigger gullet is better. They cut very slow because they are for metal.
    Did you see the band is .035 @3/4 inch wide. Its going to take a sturdy saw to pull that blade tight.
    If you want a blade that bi metal to cut wood Starrett makes a blade called woodpecker. I think it’s 3 tpi .025
    Not for tall resawing but a good blade for normal stuff.
    Good Luck
    Aj

  3. #3
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    Sorry, no experience with the QXP.

    The Starret woodpecker looks like a good blade for a saw that is best used with a 1/2 or smaller blade, but it does not seem to be bimetal.

    The only 1/2 3 TPI bimetal blade I found in .025 thickness was the Olson MVP.

  4. #4
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    I am looking at the 1" x .035" 2/3 tpi
    comparing it to the
    1" x .035" 2 tpi Woodmaster B
    for a 24" bandsaw 179" length.

    I am under the impression that a 2/3 tpi cuts smoother than a fixed 2tpi, is that correct?

    the description says:

    LONG LIFE. FAST CUTTING
    Solids of mild to moderate machinability
    Proprietary backing steel preparation provides increased fatigue life

    PENETRATES WITH LESS FEED FORCE
    Extreme positive rake tooth form

    INCREASED CUTTING RATES
    Deep gullet design
    Last edited by Stephen Bandirola; 05-12-2022 at 11:42 AM.

  5. #5
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    What Ive found that determines if a bandsaw blades cuts well is a combination of the saw, material then the right blade for the material. The dryness of the wood sharpness of the blade combined with the tooth count.
    If the wood is powerdry we can get away with a smaller gullet. Wet wood needs a big gullet with lots of set.
    Thats what makes a bandsaw a hard one to master without trail and error.
    I have a 20 Aggi I use everything from a 1/4 inch blade to woodmaster ct. Right now I have the woodpecker blade from starrett on it. Its m42 highspeed steel. Maybe not bimetal but pretty good.
    Good Luck
    Aj

  6. #6
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    I just came to the realization, why am I fing around , I bought a good used saw at a good price, I'll just buy a Laguna Resaw King blade.

  7. #7
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    Excellent choice. The Resaw King is a great blade. Post back how you like it. Treat it nice and it will last a long time. Dont Cut dirty wood with it. Unless your lighting cigars with hundred dollar bills.
    Someday Im gonna try starretts carbide tipped blade. My saw takes 176 to 178.
    Good Luck
    Aj

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Schwabacher View Post
    Sorry, no experience with the QXP.

    The Starret woodpecker looks like a good blade for a saw that is best used with a 1/2 or smaller blade, but it does not seem to be bimetal.

    The only 1/2 3 TPI bimetal blade I found in .025 thickness was the Olson MVP.
    You could try Super Cut. I have a couple of their Premium Gold blades which seem to have good blade life. Don't confuse their 'carbide' claims with Lennox Trimaster and the like. The Super Cut blades are said to contain carbide particles but there are no braised on tips. They also sell bimetal. I asked a phone guy about which was better. His answer? "It depends on what you're using it for". They aren't cheap (but what is these days?) but I've had pretty good luck with them. One thing they do sell that interests me are woodsaver blades which are supposed to be thin kerf. They'd be strictly for straight line ripping/resawing. The other thing which may or may not matter is they claim to be made in the USA. Though that may be true of Starrett and Lennox as well, dunno.

  9. #9
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    Indecision!
    Further reading seems to indicate that the Resaw Kink isn't real carbide (C4 Tungsten Carbide like you would want) and the ability to sharpen several times is needed to equal the life of the Lenox TriMaster or WoodMaster CT.
    Researching on this forum also indicates that the Trimaster cuts smoother than the WoodMaster CT requiring less planning/sanding although it is more expensive. I am a hobby woodworker and as such value the enjoyable experience more than high production rate.

    So now I'm leaning towards the TriMaster.

  10. #10
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    The Trimaster is a great band, Stephen, but it also likes a big saw due to its nature. The CT may be a little more forgiving if you don't have a big, heavy machine.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #11
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    I just bought a 2014 Felder FB610, I am under the impression that it can correctly tension and control a 1" Trimaster.
    Last edited by Stephen Bandirola; 05-13-2022 at 3:11 PM.

  12. #12
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    I guess I really should have specified the saw right up front, sorry.

  13. #13
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    I have the Lenox Woodmaster B in 1" 1.3 tpi. I got it for my 19" Grizzly 514. I hadn't decided on which carbide blade I wanted and if I did something stupid while learning the saw I didn't want to kink an expensive blade. That was something like 3 years ago and it still cuts great. At the same time I also got the Diemaster 2 1/2" 6 tpi hook blade. It also has held up great. I don't see your Felder having any problems with a 1" blade.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Bandirola View Post
    I just bought a 2014 Felder FB610, I am under the impression that it can correctly tension and control a 1" Trimaster.
    Yup: Should be no problem.

    Erik
    Ex-SCM and Felder rep

  15. #15
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    The other day we were prepping some green birch logs for turning. We cut a 1 1/2 in thick slab about 18 x 12 on my Rikon 347 to remove the pith, With a 1 Trimaster blade newly resharpened. When looking at the board we were astounded by the smoothness of the wood! It was ready for 180 sandpaper. Not a ripple or blade mark. Looked like it had been run through the planer. Have shown it to others and all are impressed with what that blade did!

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