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Thread: grab hook or slip hook

  1. #31
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    Back when we first started on this place, I had a category 1 tractor. I put a quick hitch on it. The trouble then was that I didn't have a really flat place to leave all the implements. If the ground wasn't a large enough flat place for both the tractor and the implement to be on the same plane, all sorts of non-workable possibilities presented themselves. I ended up taking it off.

    Now, my smallest tractor is a Category 2, but I still have a few of the old Category 1 implements. I now also have a large flat area where I keep all the implements. Even with that, I'm preferring telescopic drag links. Just back up close, tele the drag link arms out to attach, get back on the tractor and back up to lock the link arms. It does require getting off the tractor a couple of times, but it works every time, even if I'm somewhere the ground isn't flat.

    Rather than have to adjust the top link for different implements that require different lengths for a top link, I leave one set like I like it on each implement. I bought cheap ones from Agri-Supply. If I didn't have access to such a cheap place, I'd fabricate one for each piece.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom M King View Post
    … I'm preferring telescopic drag links. …

    Rather than have to adjust the top link for different implements that require different lengths for a top link, ...
    What you are describing sounds like what came on my Kubota tractor. SO easy to hook up everything.

    Good idea about different top links. But have you ever tried “top and tilt” cylinders? I added those to the Kubota and now I never want to have a tractor without them. Fingertip adjustments from the tractor seat. For those unfamiliar with them the top link and the right side link of the 3-point hitch are replaced with hydraulic cylinders controlled by levers next to the seat. Not only do they simplify attaching implements but even allow dynamic adjustments while the implement is in use. For example I use them a lot when grading with the yard box, fine adjustments to the top link to control the “bite” when moving dirt and gravel, adjustments to the tilt when angling a driveway or adding a shallow ditch along the side with the yard box or grading blade. Helpful even with the brush cutter, rotary tiller, landscaping rake. Extremely helpful when
    driving wooden fence posts on a slope!

    JKJ

  3. #33
    I have telescopic links on the lifting arms and they really help with some stubborn attachments and less than level ground.
    I also advocate having a couple of top links, I don't have one for each attachment but a short, a long and a flexible get most anything done without too much adjustment.

  4. #34
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    A quick hitch like this never comes off the tractor unless it's in the way of making a repair. There are no telescoping features to the arms as that would be another joint to loosen. This is a category 3 hitch with a capacity of just over 15,000 lbs. Anything that's going on it that is 3 pt is going to fit perfectly. I'm curious Edward if the issue isn't that category 1, category 2 being where the difference is that you are encountering. Just a thought. I have saw pins changed to allow a category 2 to be mounted on a category 1. The spacing difference would be where the issue would show up. In that case your Pat's system would allow either to be used without issue.
    PXL_20220512_193133562.jpg
    Last edited by Ronald Blue; 05-12-2022 at 7:55 PM.

  5. #35
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    Every category 3 or 4 tractor I've ever seen has that kind of hitch. I've only ever pulled the 15' batwing mower hooked like the one in that picture, or grading blade with that 3 pt.

    I'm not suggesting anyone don't get a quick hitch, but was just telling my experience with one. I was new then.

    Telescopic drag links are pretty common, but they are an option. My Category 2 JD still has the original ones on it. When I bought that tractor at auction 30 years ago, the hour meter was broken at 1782 hours. I've since put a few over 3,000 more hours on it and worked it harder than was ever intended for an agricultural tractor.

    Both of my tractors only have two remotes. I'd really like to have one with 3 for the batwing, but I get by. The only thing I've needed to use the remotes on while working is a grading blade that has hydraulic swing and tilt. Off set it manual, since I only have the 2 remotes. With a tailwheel, that grading blade is almost as good as a motor grader. I built a 1/4 mile road to state specs with that blade on the 117 hp tractor, and the box blade on the 70 hp tractor. I sold that development, and the state has since taken over that road.

    I know a lot of people like a hydraulic toplink for a box blade, but I only use mine for spreading, and smoothing, so have never felt the desire to need to change the tilt on it, either way.

    I'd recommend start small before adding a lot of stuff that you may, or may not need.

    The vast majority of my tractor work is done in the evenings, after regular work, so I save time when I can with things like the individual top links. Even when I had the little tractor with the quick hitch, some things required changing the length of the top link from one to the other.

    I did find some variation in sizes of the attachment points on category 1 implements, but all my category 2 stuff is the same except the top link attachment point of my box blade. I had to so some fab work on the box blade top link attachment. Some of the category 1 stuff was made in Italy, some in the USA, and some others who knows.

    I put those category 1 to category 2 pins on the category 1 pieces I have so I don't have to fiddle with the width of the drag links. They make bushings, but they don't take into account the width. The adapter pins have shoulders that work with category 2. I have them on this topdresser I built using a Tractor Supply category 1 utility hitch. It fills in low spots while smoothing out the surface, and doesn't harm grass, like in the other picture, so I can cut the grass as fast as possible on smooth ground.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Tom M King; 05-12-2022 at 7:47 PM.

  6. #36
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    I edited that post to change the category to 3. Using 3 of the 4 available remotes on the field cultivator. Tom your experience mirrors mine on most things are made to the respective specifications for the specific category. The quick hitch won't work for everything but it will work for nearly all. The lift arms with the extendable ends for hooking up were great when we didn't have a quick hitch. 45 years ago they were still a pretty new thing and a luxury.

  7. #37
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    Interesting thread morph...from a couple of movable hooks for the bucket of a sub-compact tractor to really big-butt tractor 3pt configurations.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Ronald Blue View Post
    I'm curious Edward if the issue isn't that category 1, category 2 being where the difference is that you are encountering. Just a thought.
    Personally, I think it's because CAT 1 is right there in between home owner and professional.
    You can certainly get every attachment you need in CAT 1 in a QH comparable fit. But there are just as many that are not. As Adam Herman said, not everything listed as QH compatible is.

    When you get up to Cat 2 and above, there is less of a weekend warrior factor. The attachments are made to the proper size, for people who know what they're doing, serious tractor owners.
    CAT 1 tractors are simply everywhere these days and attachments are plentiful and cheap, or at least some are cheaply made.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 05-13-2022 at 9:32 AM. Reason: fixed quote tagging

  9. #39
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    CAT 1 tractors are simply everywhere these days and attachments are plentiful and cheap, or at least some are cheaply made.
    Quite possibly a lot of cheaply made (but not necessarily cheap to buy) but they mostly do what they are intended to do. Every farm store has a line of attachments ready for you to take home.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 05-13-2022 at 9:32 AM. Reason: fixed quote tagging

  10. #40
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    IMO if you own a tractor you should also own a welding machine. Making and modifying attachments even a simple grab hook tool occurs all to often. Of course this could be me, if I am not satisfied with how an implement works I fix it rather than have to deal with an aggravating issue.

    I have also experienced problems with so called standard implements not fitting my tractor as they should.

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronald Blue View Post
    Quite possibly a lot of cheaply made (but not necessarily cheap to buy) but they mostly do what they are intended to do. Every farm store has a line of attachments ready for you to take home.
    I've found that the "house brand" Cat 1 implements have been very good for the money and are more than adequate for the forces generated by sub-compacts and small compacts. I do agree that the heavier name brand implements may be the better choice for someone who's actively earning their living using a small tractor, but even then, there will not be a huge difference because the small, nimble machines only have so much power. I always looked for used first (even if I needed to recondition as I did with an old Woods back blade) but was also very happy with brand new from Tractor Supply for a nice rake.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Outten View Post
    IMO if you own a tractor you should also own a welding machine. ….
    I strongly agree. To pay a mobile weld service or worse, load up and haul the machine somewhere a few times would pay for the welder. Even without an instructor, learning to weld is not that difficult with books and these days maybe youtube.

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Fritz View Post
    I'm looking at getting a pair of bucket hooks: https://www.bxpanded.com/BX-bucket-hooks I like the fact they can be removed when not needed.

    I will use it mostly for lifting logs and pulling them out of the woods as well as sometimes lifting heavy items. Most of the time I'll use a chain which I suppose means a grab hook, however sometimes I use a rope or strap to lift with. What type of hook do you think will serve me best?
    Dave,

    I went back to your original post and looked again at the grab hook style you are considering. Honestly I think you would be better served with a fixed mount hook system since you mentioned having the need to handle logs. My limited experience is that logs can test your machine to the max and pulling at odd angles might over stress an adjustable hook system pretty quick particularly on a smaller tractor.

    My hook is mounted in the center of the bucket but I can route chain from the hook to any of the teeth on my tooth bar when I need special spacing to accommodate a lift or drag activity. It's also pretty common for people to weld or bolt hooks at each end of their bucket, I have never had the need based on the size of my tractor and the work it does (JD 4105 40 hp diesel).

    My experience is limited as I am just a homeowner with a tractor but any serious pulling I do is with the draw bar.

  14. #44
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    It's only going to be very small logs, however, Keith. The BX can only lift about 200 kg/460 lbs and that's keeping things down low. (Dave, you need a lot of weight on the back of your BX to do this safely, too, but you likely already knew that)
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 05-15-2022 at 12:26 PM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #45
    A couple of points. For the OP, I think what he linked to or the bolt on style I used (on a much heavier machine) will work just fine.

    The whole Cat 1 three point hitch thing is simply a mess.
    The popular BX tractors are all CAT 1, I believe the early models were CAT 0.
    My MF 1635 is also a CAT 1 but the size of the machine and the capacities are vastly different.
    A BX is a Sub Compact, Mine is a compact yet they are designed to use the same CAT 1 attachments, this is where things go sideways. How can you expect such a wide range of equipment to use the same class of attachments.
    My mower weighs 550lbs, for a small tractor like a BX, that's about 80% lift capacity.
    Point is that some implements are close to being too big for the smaller machines and some are too small or light weight for the larger ones.
    Just remember no matter the size or weight, these are machines capable of doing a lot of damage if not used safely.

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