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Thread: Router Help Needed

  1. #1
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    Router Help Needed

    Even when I have completely loosened the collet, itís very difficult to remove the bit. I need to use a flathead screwdriver to release the bit.
    Suggestions appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Carefully, Tap,Tap,Tap, on the edge of the collet with the nut removed. I use the edge of the wrench or a tiny machinist ball peen hammer. It is frustrating. The self ejecting collets are so nice.
    Last edited by Maurice Mcmurry; 05-06-2022 at 5:03 PM.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  3. #3
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    When I have a stuck bit I use the edge of the collett wrench and tap the shank of the bit. Make sure your collett is actually loose. Many loosen then turn easily a little then get tight again so you need to use the wrench again.
    Maurice types faster than me
    Steve Jenkins, McKinney, TX. 469 742-9694
    Always use the word "impossible" with extreme caution

  4. #4
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    A lot of collets are consumables.

    Check online to see where to pick one up for your router.


    You are making sure when you seat the bit you pull up on it so it's not bottomed out right?

    I keep a rubber gasket in my collet so it keeps the bit from bottoming out.

    If the bit bottoms out, it will act like you're describing.
    Last edited by Rich Engelhardt; 05-07-2022 at 10:46 AM.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
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  5. #5
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    In most cases when using routers that were made in the last 30 years, the nut and collet are snapped together before installation. To remove the bit from the collet, all you need to do is to loosen the nut, and then turn it another revolution or so, where the nut again requires the wrench. This time, using the wrench this second time, pulls the collet out of the shaft for you. If your collet and nut aren't attached together, pulling the collet out to loosen the bit can be quite a task. Always make certain that the collet and nut are snapped together before installing it, and remember to loosen the nut with the wrench twice to get the bit out easily.

    Charley

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Gibbons View Post
    Even when I have completely loosened the collet, itís very difficult to remove the bit. I need to use a flathead screwdriver to release the bit.
    Suggestions appreciated.
    Do you mean even when you have loosened the nut? What router is it? I never bring anything steel around a router bit. You can easily chip the carbide and then you have a bigger problem than just a stuck bit.

  7. #7
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    I'm with other folks who have responded. Loosening modern collets is often a two stage affair. Loosen the nut with wrenches till it spins free and continue till it stops again, loosen with the wrenches a second time and remove the bit. If you are not getting caught up by the second loosening step then it may be time for a new collet. A good cleaning of collet and bits may also solve the issue.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  8. #8
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    It is a small DeWalt handheld router that accepts a 1/4 inch shaft. I completely loosen the nut. Definitely want to keep metal away from the bits. Thanks for the feedback. I think I will take everything apart and clean it. Saw a video on how to clean router bits, nuts, and collets. Maybe this could solve my issue.

  9. #9
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    A lot of my routers are old to quite old. When I initially seat a bit in the collet I always make sure to pull it up an 1/8" or so before tightening the collet. When it comes time to remove the bit a little tap on the end of the bit frees it from the collet. If the bit is seated at the bottom of the collet it is MUCH harder to free up from the collet.

    BUT the proper way to do it is to never change the router bit. I have a half dozen routers (old, Stanley mostly) routers that always wear the same commonly use bit. I.e. when I need a 1/4" round over I just grab the old Stanley router with the 1/4" round over bit on it and go to town, it is already set for the right height. I usually torque the height lock by hand which is easy on the Stanley's and doesn't require a tool. If I haven't used a router in quite a while I will also torque the collet but most of the routers have been wearing their specific bit for many years.

    1/2" shank bits do seem easier to change than 1/4" bits in my experience.
    Last edited by Michael Schuch; 05-07-2022 at 7:32 PM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Gibbons View Post
    It is a small DeWalt handheld router that accepts a 1/4 inch shaft. I completely loosen the nut. Definitely want to keep metal away from the bits. Thanks for the feedback. I think I will take everything apart and clean it. Saw a video on how to clean router bits, nuts, and collets. Maybe this could solve my issue.
    So you're saying even if you take the collet nut completely off the bit is still stuck in the collet? Like several mentioned the two stage system is extremely common these days and usually work quite well. Loosen, spin to the resistance again and wrench it again and the collet is released from the taper.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Ronald Blue View Post
    So you're saying even if you take the collet nut completely off the bit is still stuck in the collet? Like several mentioned the two stage system is extremely common these days and usually work quite well. Loosen, spin to the resistance again and wrench it again and the collet is released from the taper.
    My old PC 100's use an old style, non self ejecting collet. To get bit out, I loosen the nut a couple turns, with collet supported on the bench, hit the nut with wrench a couple times.

  12. #12
    If I can't get the bit out by hand, I re-tighten the collect nut by hand, slide a 1/4" or 1/2" open end wrench, depending on the bit shank size, onto the router bit shank and start to loosen the collet nut again. As the collet nut is loosened, it presses against the wrench which presses against the bit and pops the bit right out.

  13. #13
    On a job I heard a guy complain about a router bit moving. Asked him if he had inserted the bit all the way ,and then backed it out an 1/8th.
    He said he had not, and had ďnever heard of thatĒ. He tried it an it worked ! I think he might not have ever used a router before.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    On a job I heard a guy complain about a router bit moving. Asked him if he had inserted the bit all the way ,and then backed it out an 1/8th.
    He said he had not, and had “never heard of that”. He tried it an it worked ! I think he might not have ever used a router before.
    Just by habit I always make sure of where "bottom" is and then pull the bit out a little to make sure it's not bottomed out. It's the little things that can make a big difference.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Gibbons View Post
    It is a small DeWalt handheld router that accepts a 1/4 inch shaft. I completely loosen the nut. Definitely want to keep metal away from the bits. Thanks for the feedback. I think I will take everything apart and clean it. Saw a video on how to clean router bits, nuts, and collets. Maybe this could solve my issue.

    Just an add-on. I should have emphasized making sure the cleaned parts are clear of any 'cleaner' residue and dry, dry, dry. Mineral spirits is a common cleaner in the shop but can leave a residue. A quick rub with a paper towel wet with denatured alcohol can take care of most MS or other leftovers. Like a Morse taper fit, the mating surfaces want to be clean and dry ;-)
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

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