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Thread: Drywall butted on a stud question

  1. #1

    Drywall butted on a stud question

    So, I have done very little drywalling, maybe 15 sheets or so. I know butted joints must end on a stud. So the end of the drywall is 3/4" onto a stud for each piece. That seems sparse to me. In the past I have added a 2X3 to the existing stud to allow more area to support the dry wall and add a wider width to screw into. Is this overkill? Thoughts

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    It doesn't hurt, but it's not needed. Pros never do it.

  3. #3
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    I'm sure there is more done that way than any other. When I was building new houses, I'd put two studs together, and run them down 3/32's narrower than the other studs, so that joint was pulled in a little more than the surface of the rest of the wall. Ends aren't tapered, so this let me tape them, and keep the whole wall flat. A raking light will show every butt joint done the normal way. I planned the layout when I framed the house.

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    I'm just an amateur but have done quite a bit of sheetrock. I now land butt joints between studs and use butt boards (https://www.trim-tex.com/products/ov...rywall-backer/ ) which are strips of OSB with a v shaped double taper so they pull the ends in, simulating the tapered sides of the sheetrock. Same idea as Tom mentioned but the buttboard doesn't interfere with wiring or plumbing in the cavity. Lets you get a nice flat joint with no hump.

    The best option is to use longer sheets so there are no (or fewer) butt joints. Of course that's had to do without help, a lift, or both.
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  5. #5
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    I always hang walls vertically and have no butt joints. Creating a dip for ceilings is a good idea.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  6. #6
    Thanks for your inputs and insights. So many details to every process. My cottage renovation has opened my eyes to a lot of details and how important it is to try to figure how the first steps affect the last.

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    Use twice as many fasteners on the buts. Usually 6" centers. If using screws, go into the stud at a slight angle to leave a bit more paper between the fastener and the edge, and do your best to not rip the paper by driving them in too far. Nails are better than screws for butt joints. Nails do not tear paper as easily. There are sheet rock hammers too, BTW.

    Or - just hire a pro. I hate sheetrock. Hanging, taping, mud, texture - all of it. But I end up doing myself anyway, despite hating it so much.

  8. #8
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    I also use nails, and a sheetrock hammer on the ends. I don't like the old fashioned sheet rock nails with flat heads that have sharp edges. I also try to avoid any tearing of the paper. Home Depot sells some sheetrock nails that have reverse domed heads. I use those. If any paper gets torn, I saturate it with yellow glue, which also works on the face of a sheet.

    I also hate messing with it, and will use something else as much as possible. If I do any, it has to look perfect while taking the least amount of both time and sanding possible.

    There are some good tools these days: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...e?ie=UTF8&th=1
    Last edited by Tom M King; 05-07-2022 at 1:10 PM.

  9. #9
    Not exactly sure why not tearing the Sheetrock paper is important? And while hammering 16p nails into lumber typically bends them which is conducive to their holding power, sheet rock nails don't bend much if at all, so I don't understand why they would be better than screws? If the screws or nails are properly seated, and the seams are properly mudded, taped and sanded, seems all should be well regardless...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kev Williams View Post
    Not exactly sure why not tearing the Sheetrock paper is important?
    It makes for more work in cleaning things up and also slightly weakens the connection of the 'rock to the wall since the gypsum in the middle crumbles easily...the heavy paper provides more support for the fastener.
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    I always try to put butt joints at window and doors most rooms you can get by witout butt joints.

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    Not an expert by any means but with the extra size sheets available these days pros that I know lay sheets horizontal because it makes fewer joints. Up to 14' long and 54" wide so it makes for fewer seams to deal with. There may be some additional sizes as well but these are the ones I'm familiar with. I was always told to avoid breaking through the paper by overdriving the fastener regardless if it is a screw or nail. The holding power is reduced when this happens.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    It makes for more work in cleaning things up and also slightly weakens the connection of the 'rock to the wall since the gypsum in the middle crumbles easily...the heavy paper provides more support for the fastener.
    Nicely said. An analogy.....try eating a sandwich with torn and soggy bread. Most of the stuff inside the bread ends up in your lap.

    The gypsum will also want to push out on the edge if the screws are driven too close to the edge, hence my recommendation to angle them into the joint - providing more paper to keep the gypsum from squeezing out. Screws work great in the valley, but they do tend to push the gypsum out at the edges more than the little sheet rock nails do, so I will use the nails when I'm doing many sheets and actually remember to do this.

    Also, when you break the paper on any fastener, you may end up with a crack because the sheetrock will tend to move more over time. A perfectly taped inside corner, or example, might move over time and you end up with a crack. It's just worth the little bit of extra time to pull the fastener back out (if you break the paper), and install another fastener.

    If I am hanging rock over head or by myself, I use nails to get the sheet secured, because it's a lot easier for me to drive a nail with one whack than fiddle around with screw and driver. I then finish the sheet with screws when both hands are free.

    These are all just tips and tricks I've learned over the years, all learned the hard way.

  14. #14
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    You can get 16 foot drywall that should take care of most rooms. You do need to go to a real drywall outlet and most will haul and stock it for you.

  15. #15
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    I try not to screw edge joints or butt joints until both sheets are in place. The little pucker that the screw creates takes up valuable space on the stud. Another advantage of avoiding the ends of the sheets for joints is the added strength created by the paper wrapping around on the the edges. The drywall screw gun is a tool that many can not master. I got good at it right away as a young man. Now I am trying to get my courage up to get a Titanium elbow.
    Best Regards, Maurice

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