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Thread: Some cross grain boxes

  1. #16
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    Northern MN
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    Lawrence, did you do the glass as well? Glass has always fascinated me. And the turning and carving are wonderful as well. Even though it's not what I do myself, I love seeing the range of approaches, talents, and creativity. Thanks to everyone that posted something.

    I do have to ask about the photograph -- did you alter it digitally? It looks like the piece is floating.

    Best,

    Dave

  2. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Lawrence Duckworth View Post
    Gary, Love the milk can!
    great story too!
    Thank you Lawrence! Love the creativity in your piece.

    Gary
    I've only had one...in dog beers.

  3. #18
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    Jul 2018
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    Georgia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Mount View Post
    Lawrence, did you do the glass as well? Glass has always fascinated me. And the turning and carving are wonderful as well. Even though it's not what I do myself, I love seeing the range of approaches, talents, and creativity. Thanks to everyone that posted something.

    I do have to ask about the photograph -- did you alter it digitally? It looks like the piece is floating.

    Best,

    Dave

    Dave, if you like spheres you'd love glass.

    CCECEDF9-FA9A-4167-88B2-7C887F9BB0C0_1_201_a.jpg

    The photo is probably cropped because of the size of the object.
    I tried selling my glass pumpkins for a while on etsy. the photo booth has a glass bottom and is covered with a sanded plexiglass sheet. Then I place a light under it for effect....

    BDF9B4A3-023C-4E9D-87BA-09B738319F8A_1_201_a.jpeg


  4. #19
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    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    11,646

    Lid fit

    Quite nice work, beautiful wood!

    The concern about the fit is valid. For Beads of Courage boxes I've been teaching the use of beveled fits instead of straight rabbet/recess, not only to avoid sticking with seasonal changes but to allow kids with possible limited coordination or mobility to more easily replace the lid. This diagram is from one of my handouts (typically made in sections from dry cross grain blanks, all prehollowed before glueup.
    BOC_diag3.jpg

    A visualization aid I use in demos, showing how easy it is to drop the lid into place with extra clearance from the bevel:
    BOC_P1090095.jpg

    This photo show typical pre-hollowed pieces just before glueup.
    BOC_stack_comp.jpg

    I've done them with both inside and outside bevels.
    The first one here is from face grain blanks with the beveled "tenon" on the base and the beveled "recess" on the lid. The second one has the beveled tenon on the lid and the beveled recess in the base. Even though the second was from a big piece of dry endgrain poplar and unlikely to warp much, I beveled the join to make it easier to replace the lid.

    BOC_A_CU_IMG_5374.jpg BOC_B_comp.jpg

    Once at a symposium I looked at 10 BOC boxes turned in for distribution to hospitals. All of them had straight straight "piston fits" for the lids. Although the lids were turned with a little slop FIVE of the lids were stuck and couldn't be removed easily! The potential problem is much worse with the large diameters typical for BOC boxes. All the potential lid fitting problem is eliminated with the beveled joins.

    (Sorry, these pictures are not of recent work!)

    Dave, since you make far better use good wood I should send you a care package of burls, spalted, figured, crotches, and exotics!!

    JKJ

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Mount View Post
    ...
    I like the clean look of a flush joint between lid and base but when using mismatched woods they just don't stay flush, so I've resorted to putting a small chamfer on lid and base to obscure small differences in diameter that occur with the seasons. Piston fits on the lids are not a great idea either, for the same reason. I'm a little leery about whether I've left enough room; worst case I'll remount the base and cut the rabbet back.
    Last edited by John K Jordan; 05-07-2022 at 5:28 PM. Reason: correction

  5. #20
    John, what an amazing tip to bevel the sides. Simply hasn't occurred to me (likely because I'm new at this). Beautiful.

  6. #21
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    Georgia
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    These boxes you guys are making would make great Christmas gifts!

    Nice tutorial John. I did something similar with the mandolin sound boards and it takes the stress out of trying to get a perfect fit. btw the adjustable fixture you recommended a while back was perfect for holding and scraping the sound boards.

    EB1C0687-8A99-45A9-AEB7-636F8F648811_1_201_a.jpg

  7. #22
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    Location
    Northern MN
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    JKJ, beveled joints are a great solution, I feel kind of foolish for being so tunnel visioned to have not thought of it. And good on you for having put so much effort into helping others, recipients of either your turnings or your teaching.

    Best,

    Dave

  8. #23
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    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Mount View Post
    JKJ, beveled joints are a great solution….
    Thanks! Maybe eventually it will be commonly used. I’ve shown it in 4-5 demos so far.

    I got a surprise after teaching this technique to our turning club members. A couple of years later I attended a different club as a turner from our club demonstrated making BOC boxes. I felt a warm satisfaction when he suggested the beveled lid design!

    BTW I got the idea from Harvey Meyer to prehollow and stack dry wood layers to build up a deeper box. He did two layers but I added a third layer in the middle made of basswood - I wanted to chip carve words in the basswood layer AND provide more internal volume. Since then I’ve made some with as many as 5 layers, some thin. Prehollowing several layers of dry wood is s LOT easier than first gluing then deep hollowing dry hardwoods!

    Also, like everyone, I'm learning better ways as I go. This was my first glue up. I was afraid it would clamp unevenly so I went overboard:

    IMG_20160123_114137_571.jpg

    Then on the advice of Frank Penta I bought this inexpensive book press. I bolted it to some wooden riser blocks on a sturdy base and now the one big clamp is sufficient!

    book_press.jpg

    This one, walnut and cherry, has a carved handle. Maybe I'll make one like it and color it like a big apple or watermelon.

    BOC_E_IMG_7162.jpg BOC_E_IMG_7171.jpg

    JKJ
    Last edited by John K Jordan; 05-07-2022 at 6:26 PM. Reason: additional info

  9. #24
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    Jul 2018
    Location
    Georgia
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    more lid options....

    The metal hemisphere and solid metal balls are from King Architectural https://www.kingmetals.com/Catalog/C...?CatalogId=c39... the flat and round stock I get from the little metal rack at HD.

    I rolled the metal ring cold by hand around a wood template the same diameter as the box lid. For the stem I use a 3/8" round and grind it to a taper and weld it to the metal ball and then weld the ball/stem to the hemisphere from the backside, and finish with a "puddling" texture.

    For puddle texturing I use a #4 torch welding tip. I go heavy with the gas torch mix to get the top of the metal surface molten and not burn. it may seem like slow going at first but once the metal starts to move it goes pretty good....after it cools ..... a light sanding to knock off the tops and a good buffing.

    6A09F2BD-C765-4309-8CC6-1B357229DDA2_1_201_a.jpeg 805AD716-44EA-4626-A3B9-1238CD10E512_1_201_a.jpg

  10. #25
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    Jul 2018
    Location
    Georgia
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