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Thread: I hate rusty saws, but...

  1. #16
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    Yup, looks like it’s been sharpened or retoothed a few times. I’ve seen these before. Sometimes the etching is touching the teeth. They work great as panel saws. Just cut the length back and rework the handle.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  2. #17
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    Some swear by using AutoSol and a wadded up ball of Foil...others will use the Auto Body Rubbing Compound and a cloth rag.....Once it is bright and shiny, again....wipe it down with a light coat of oil...to keep it from rusting again...
    A Planer? I'm the Planer, and this is what I use

  3. #18
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    Carlsbad, CA
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    A saw insight I think is often under appreciated is the only reason a saw has been sharpened so many time that the plate is much narrower than factory width is multiple generations of crafts people made a living using it! I’m personally a big fan of these saws, especially for finer pitch finish saws. Don’t neglect these saws as they are often great users.

  4. #19
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    Nov 2021
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    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
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    May be it is time for grand dads saw to become a 10 or 12 TPI. I could do away with the broken and weird teeth if I started from scratch?
    Best Regards, Maurice

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maurice Mcmurry View Post
    May be it is time for grand dads saw to become a 10 or 12 TPI. I could do away with the broken and weird teeth if I started from scratch?
    Beware of completely filing of all current teeth. It’s really hard to create uniform tooth line from scratch.better to work off exsisting teeth to shift spacing and tooth size.

  6. #21
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    Nov 2021
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Allen1010 View Post
    Beware of completely filing of all current teeth. It’s really hard to create uniform tooth line from scratch.better to work off exsisting teeth to shift spacing and tooth size.
    SMC lead me to a video, with instructions, from an experienced guy starting from scratch. Key word Experienced. Being fairly new to saw filing, I am liking your advice.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  7. #22
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    $1 RUSTY saw, today...
    The Disston, before, the plate.JPG
    Disston & Sons, pre-1928 D-8
    The Disston. Before, handle.JPG
    Have to learn to look beneath the grime, and a bent plate...because..
    The Disston, after, plate.JPG
    15 minutes in the shop later...bends are gone, rust is gone...handle has been given a wipe down with oil...
    The Disston, after, oiled handle.JPG
    And now I have a very fine cross cut saw....looks like maybe a 10ppi?

    Will count the teeth later...26" length...
    A Planer? I'm the Planer, and this is what I use

  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Maurice Mcmurry View Post
    SMC lead me to a video, with instructions, from an experienced guy starting from scratch. Key word Experienced. Being fairly new to saw filing, I am liking your advice.
    I'll offer a contrary view to Mike's. I did what he suggested my first time filing. The saw was not all that bad but there were several places that needed the teeth resized/reshaped. The first round of that went OK, but eventually it ended up at least as bad as it started. Doing this takes some finesse that I lack. As an alternative, I will suggest downloading the appropriate template from Blackburn Tools. Tape it to the saw plate so that it does not move. Then take a Dremel type tool with a very thin cutoff wheel and score grooves about a 1/16" or less where the gullet is to go. That will guide the file and keep things even.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
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    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
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    Chuck Hill, Thanks for the link to Blackburn Tools. I have that bookmarked and will be reading through while I get my plate cleaned up and thoroughly inspected.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  10. #25
    A couple other pieces of advice from someone who is extremely not experienced in saw sharpening. One, it is much easier to get a good result that it seems like it will be. Saw sharpening is pretty forgiving. If one tooth is off, there is another to do its work. Even a poorly sharpened saw cuts much, much better than a dull saw. I was shocked at how well my first try cut. The set was a little uneven but I used Paul Sellers technique of using one hammer as an anvil and gently tapping out some of the set. Then it tracked nearly perfectly.

    Second, start with some guides. These can be as simple as a piece of wood to show the rake and fleam angles or as fancy as the Veritas Saw File Holder. I have the Veritas one and I have found it very helpful.

  11. #26
    Here are the results of my first attempt at a horn repair, on a 12" Disston backsaw. Tip of the hat to Jim Koepke for his thread and advice. Comments welcome. I was a little concerned with how the epoxy bonded the repair to the rest of the handle, in terms of the seam thickness, but I think I was being overly worried. Let me know what you all think.
    1. The broken upper horn
    20220502_133459.jpg
    2. Rube Goldberg glue up
    20220506_010350.jpg
    3.After shaping, next to my 10" Disston backsaw
    20220515_145628.jpg
    4. Back view after shaping
    20220515_145649.jpg
    5. Top view after shaping
    20220515_145711.jpg
    6. After Early American stain, to bring the colors closer together, and Antique oil finish
    20220516_151548.jpg

  12. #27
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    Nov 2021
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    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
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    Nice job Matt Hunstiger! There is not a shortage of rust on any of my saws. Here is another one I look forward to cleaning up. I found it in a crawlspace under a big old church. It is a spooky spot, very dark and inaccessible, dirty, cobwebs, lonely. I spent a good deal of time in there. Finding this saw is a bit of a reward. My collector friend thinks it must be a child's saw. He made no bones about wanting to have it.

    IMG_0540.jpg
    Best Regards, Maurice

  13. #28
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    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
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    No longer rusty..
    Laundry Detail, test dry.JPG
    Brass has a shine to it...
    Laundry Detail, brass shined.JPG
    That top bolt is a smaller diameter than the other 4 bolts...
    Laundry Detail, clocked, almost.JPG
    And, seems to have been made that way, by Disston...
    I did count the teeth....11 ppi. Appears to have been from before 1927....D8, 26" Fine Cross cut saw...

    Not too bad, for just a $1?
    A Planer? I'm the Planer, and this is what I use

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
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    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
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    Quote Originally Posted by steven c newman View Post
    No longer rusty..
    Laundry Detail, test dry.JPG
    Brass has a shine to it...
    Laundry Detail, brass shined.JPG
    That top bolt is a smaller diameter than the other 4 bolts...
    Laundry Detail, clocked, almost.JPG
    And, seems to have been made that way, by Disston...
    I did count the teeth....11 ppi. Appears to have been from before 1927....D8, 26" Fine Cross cut saw...

    Not too bad, for just a $1?
    It looks right at home on your well worn bench. You are obviously a tool user who tinkers with collecting.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  15. #30
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    Nice looking repair Matt.

    Glad to hear my input helped.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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