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Thread: Anyone make a set of hollows and rounds?

  1. #1
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    Anyone make a set of hollows and rounds?

    I'm very interested in, eventually, making a 1/4 or 1/2 set of hollows and rounds. I'm wondering if any one has any resource recommendations for detailed plans, dimensions, etc. I have the Traditional Hand Plane book by Whelan, which has some great information, and am now looking for more. I've seen Red Rose Reproductions sells plans, but not sure I want to invest in those in additional to sourcing quartersawn beech, irons, and a set of floats. I have a handful of flea market finds for reference. I'm actually surprised Lost Art Press doesn't have a book just for this. Maybe I'm over-thinking it!

  2. #2
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    Stewie Simpson made a set a few years back > https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?258178

    An old post of mine also has some information on molding planes that may come in handy > https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?242156

    There is a link in that thread for Calib James (Plane Maker) web site with some free plans for planes. Check the labels on the side of the page for some great information.

    See you back here in a few weeks.

    jtk
    Last edited by Jim Koepke; 04-28-2022 at 7:48 PM.
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #3
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    There is a useful Pop Wood article here: https://www.popularwoodworking.com/a...ollows-rounds/

    The classic video, which sparked interest in many to make their own, is by Larry Williams (Old Street planes, formerly Clarke and Williams). Find a copy. It is excellent.

    Preview: https://vimeo.com/41725472

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan McGonigle View Post
    I'm very interested in, eventually, making a 1/4 or 1/2 set of hollows and rounds. I'm wondering if any one has any resource recommendations for detailed plans, dimensions, etc.
    There are tons of free plans on internet, or you could grab any vintage plane and copy dimensions, this is not a big deal. A hard requirement on some specialized tools is a big deal, though.

    Currently nobody offers planemaker's floats. Maybe LN will continue production at some point, but today all the vendors that used to sell them are out of stock. You can't replace them with a milled tooth files - wrong shapes and also too slow. These files are finishing tools, real floats are faster and leave glass smooth surface. There were people that attempted making floats themselves. Observing their adventures I personally decided to wait for some vendor. Or maybe if we could find enough people we could put a small batch order to some manufacturing company: assuming a float retails at around 60$ a piece, probably an order of 20 floats of every type would make it sufficiently interesting for them.

    A very narrow (less than 1/8") chisel is required. An old chisel can probably be ground narrow, so it's a lesser issue. Rest (holding devices, templates, jigs, slips, etc) can probably be made from bits and pieces collected around the shop.

    Another factor is the cost of materials. Some time ago I did back of an envelope calculations, the total cost of tools and materials was around 80% of RRR or Brickford's price, don't really remember. That was with the assumption I would nail it down just perfect on the first attempt, or it would actually be more expensive than buying from Matt or RRR.

    Another option could be going for a class if there's one in your area. Sadly, there are none in vicinity of my shop, and traveling to Roy's school (seems to be the only school that offers this class in 2022) is equal buying a full set from Larry Williams money wise.

    Of course I'm assuming you're talking about a classic 18th century English hollow & round. If you want anything that could run a particular profile, there was an article by Matt Brickford in FWW showing a French style molding plane. It has a mortise completely open from one side, so regular tools would be enough. Not sure about longevity of such a plane, since there's just a thin sliver that holds both parts together, I'd expect it to warp pretty quickly. But given the simplicity of the construction you can just build another one in under an hour.

  5. #5
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    But given the simplicity of the construction you can just build another one in under an hour.
    Under an hour would be remarkable even for someone with experience.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Dover View Post
    Currently nobody offers planemaker's floats.
    Lee Valley does.

  7. #7
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    Philly Planes does.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Tyler Bancroft View Post
    Lee Valley does.
    Lee Valley offers "Iwasaki carving files". They're files indeed, not floats — too slow. They're okay for little adjustments of existing cheeks and beds, but floating a rough mortise will take ages, because they clog very fast (they're very, very fine files).

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Rafael Herrera View Post
    Philly Planes does.
    Only the edge float, and for the price that's twice the LN price if you consider shipping from the other side of the pond. One needs at least three - an edge float, a cheek float and a bed float. A bed float is the least essential though, wide surfaces could be scraped.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    Under an hour would be remarkable even for someone with experience.
    Well, maybe not under an hour. But that "French" type plane is literally a rectangular block of wood with a weird shaped dado, how long would that take? Shaping, hardening and tempering an iron, sharpening, fitting a wedge — that might take longer, so, say, a couple of hours?

    I actually own one of such planes. Judging by its profile and a decoration style I'm pretty sure it was shop made by a Scandinavian guy. The wood is obviously a discarded off-cut with a nasty knot in it, it cracked and was crudely repaired with a nail. The plane has an old file for a cutter. Whoever made it didn't fret - blowouts, deeply scored layout lines, etc. The body has two moldings itself, quite coarsely cut, maybe even scraped. It's a surprisingly serviceable plane. It had a typical problem: a hump developed right behind the mouth, also the sole was worn and didn't match the iron. Or maybe iron didn't match the sole. But once this was remedied, it cut a clean, albeit unfamiliar, profile.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Dover View Post
    Lee Valley offers "Iwasaki carving files". They're files indeed, not floats — too slow. They're okay for little adjustments of existing cheeks and beds, but floating a rough mortise will take ages, because they clog very fast (they're very, very fine files).
    https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop...t?item=62W3096

    Not sure if this is what you're referring to, but I'd call that a float (as does LV). They call them extra-fine, but I'm not sure I'd call them that fine. I have a couple.

  12. #12
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    I have those floats. They are for finishing, and won't do a lot of hogging off material. They are more coarse than the Iwasaki finest wood files, but still nothing like a more common plane float. I just bought them in case I needed them for fine tuning sash joinery, and they have been very rarely used.

  13. #13
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    A lot of great info, thanks everyone. Yes the planes I'd like to make are the traditional side escapement type. I've checked out some floats here and there, but Id really prefer the LN if they ever come back in stock. Finding QS beech may be tough though. I understand I can use any type of wood Id like, but Id like to keep to the tradition. I would probably have to find a supplier or mill that has beech, and pick out any QS pieces I see.

    One question, is the hollow used to profile the round? One would make a hollow first, then use it to make the round? That would make only make sense.

  14. #14
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    It's easier to make the round first, and the hollow from that. I'll second the LN Traditional Side Escapement video.
    ~mike

    life in a mud hut

  15. #15
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    There those who make their own floats. FWW had an article on it many years ago.

    A float can be made up of a malleable steel. It just gets dull quickly compared to a hardened steel.

    If one wants to try their hand at hardening it can be made out of O1 steel.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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