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Thread: Shop Build...should be a fun journey...

  1. #331
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Funk View Post
    Looking good. Do you also plan to put some steel mesh down? We had 6x6 mesh it on our slabs and used it to secure hot water heating pipes. Not sure if it was for strength or to allow the pipes to be attached.
    3500 psi fiber mesh concrete. No steel required for this floor

    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Grund View Post
    Out of curuousity, do you know if the “squish” of the insulation would pose a problem with the concrete if you drove heavy vehicles over it regularly? Honestly I’ve never heard of doing that, and my mind went to right what I’d be using a garage for, working on cars.
    I honestly don't know, but I've seen plenty of videos where hydronic heat went in over foam that then had a reinforced slab poured over it that was intended for hefty vehicles. The foam really doesn't "squish" or compress unless you hit it with a point source, such as your kneecap.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #332
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Grund View Post
    Out of curuousity, do you know if the “squish” of the insulation would pose a problem with the concrete if you drove heavy vehicles over it regularly? Honestly I’ve never heard of doing that, and my mind went to right what I’d be using a garage for, working on cars.
    Foam under slabs is pretty much standard practice in building these days; has been for a while. A lot of heat is gained or loss through the slab without insulation. Compressive strength of XPS foam (which is what Jim used) varies depending on specific type, but starts at about 15 psi, which is over a ton per square foot. XPS is available in strengths up to 100 psi, or over 7 tons per square foot. When you factor in that the concrete distributes the load over a greater area, even 15 psi foam isn't going to be "squished" by a car's weight.
    --The bad news is: time flies. The good news is: you're the pilot.-- (Michael Altshuler)

  3. #333
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    I thought the xps acted as a vapor barrier when taped , so why the plastic sheeting too ?

  4. #334
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Sabo View Post
    I thought the xps acted as a vapor barrier when taped , so why the plastic sheeting too ?
    XPS is not a very good vapor barrier. 2" thick XPS is an order of magnitude more permeable than 6mil poly according to the manufacturer.

  5. #335
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    That's my understanding, too, Greg. The tape on the foam isn't really sealing all that much because the stone under it isn't perfectly smooth, too. Of course, NOW it's flat to the ground with tons of concrete on top. LOL

    -----

    The floor pour went well today...and yes, all the floor stuff will get it's own time lapse episode. But here's a shot after they left. The lighting/reflections/"pushing the exposure", etc., make it look rough, but it's smooth as a baby's backside, other than the apron which has a broom finish. I'm very pleased. They will be back in a day or so to saw the expansion joints that try to keep any cracking over time from being random.

    IMG_E2490.jpg

    And from above...

    IMG_2491.jpg
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #336
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    Builder's QC fellow was here today for the remarkably short punch list...replaced one corner trim piece that was, um...disheveled...and replaced the man door that had a dent/crack in a lower panel. I was surprised that he replaced the entire door assembly, not just the door. He said it was actually easier to do that way and it was indeed a quick process. Oh, and he left me a container of the touch up paint I requested to deal with, um...boo boos...over time.

    Concrete foreman will be back tomorrow to cut the relief lines and also deal with the fiber mesh "forest" that is in some areas and not to my liking. My expectation isn't for a polished floor, but it does need to be smooth. They will take care of it.

    Ran some quick and dirty elevations with my rotary laser to see what's required for grading at the front to bring everything together now that the build is complete. A simple French drain about 3' in front of the building will catch any runoff. I also used the Big Orange Power Tool to grade out all the extra dirty soil in the back of the building for a gentler slope and then spread the the pile of excess topsoil I had back there on top of it...followed by seeding and mulching. It's a good time of year to plant grass.

    Next up is for the electrician to complete the power service to the building and spray foam is scheduled for next Thursday.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #337
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    Looking great Jim. Do you have any plans to paint the floor?
    Please help support the Creek.


    Where we have strong emotions, we're liable to fool ourselves.
    - Carl Sagan


  8. #338
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    It looks awesome Jim. Very happy that it’s coming together so well. Should be a great place to work and hang out.

  9. #339
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    Yes, it's coming along. Relief cuts were done on the floor this morning and they are "arrow straight".

    IMG_2517.jpg

    The concrete folks also took my concern seriously about the "forest" of fiber that was populating the surface and used a buffer with an abrasive pad to knock the majority of the fuz down to the surface. They left me a five gallon container (new and full) of the sealer which I will roller apply after things settle down dust wise which should deal with any remaining fibers on the surface. It seems like a little thing, but I envisioned and requested a smooth surface, not something beyond a five o'clock shadow. It's been dealt with to my satisfaction.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Page View Post
    Looking great Jim. Do you have any plans to paint the floor?
    Paint, no. Just the sealer which at this point is only going to cost me for a big roller and pan plus a little time. I have plenty of the latter as I can't do anything else inside the building until after the spray foam goes in late next week. So I'll do the sealer in the next few days and I have enough of it to do a very generous application...maybe even two heavier coats. The couple of areas that "inadvertently" did get a heavier coating when they sprayed it on look very nice, so I'm hopeful for a nice surface. With a completely empty space, application will be easy.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 09-29-2022 at 2:16 PM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #340
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    Jim, my experience with two different spray foam jobs is they get excess foam 'everywhere'. Overspray plus hoses/connections that leaked,... If you want to keep your concrete floor looking pristine I encourage you to cover it with builders paper, and leave it covered as long as possible. Then when you pull up the paper you'll have a beautiful slab.
    Mark McFarlane

  11. #341
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    When we built my house we covered the floor with red rosin paper to protect it. It did okay but it tore rather easily and needed a lot of repair over the length of construction.

    If I did it again, I'd use Ramboard or a similar product, which is quite a bit thicker and tougher than paper. More expensive, yes, but worth it for what you get.

  12. #342
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark mcfarlane View Post
    Jim, ... If you want to keep your concrete floor looking pristine ...
    FWIW, I used X-Board from Home Depot. Put it down as soon as the shop was water tight. It held up fine through all the various crews over 4 months. $40 for ~250 sq ft, + tape
    Mark McFarlane

  13. #343
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark mcfarlane View Post
    Jim, my experience with two different spray foam jobs is they get excess foam 'everywhere'. Overspray plus hoses/connections that leaked,... If you want to keep your concrete floor looking pristine I encourage you to cover it with builders paper, and leave it covered as long as possible. Then when you pull up the paper you'll have a beautiful slab.
    The insulation contractor is supposed to be fully covering everything that needs to be protected...it's part of their prep work. But this is a good reminder to folks for sure and you can be comfortable that I'll be confirming it with them before "the day".
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #344
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    The insulation contractor is supposed to be fully covering everything that needs to be protected....
    Jim, It's good you plan to talk to them. A concrete slab may not be something they typically 'protect', thinking it is good enough to 'scrape' the slab of overspray before flooring is added.
    Mark McFarlane

  15. #345
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    Mark, I have written confirmation from the contractor that they absolutely cover the floor (no matter what it's made of), in addition to windows, doors, lights, etc. They specialize in spray foam. They are also doing any and all of the necessary work "up top" to seal off soffits and the ridge vent since the builder assumes one will need ventilation which is not the case with a spray foam envelope.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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