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Thread: Shop Build...should be a fun journey...

  1. #241
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Orwell, NY
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    1,144
    It looks very nice, good for you. I suppose by September the ground will have had some time to settle, so that may be a good aspect of waiting.

  2. #242
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    61,354
    Yes, there is likely to be a little bit of additional settling, even though it was built in layers which were individually compacted with both the weight of the Big Orange Power Tool and a very heavy vibratory plate compactor. It is, however, pretty darn hard so far, even after the very heavy rain we just had the other day. Here's what the property next door looked like after that morning rain...I ended up putting in some trenches for Chris, the owner, to get that newly minted pond to empty so things would dry out faster. He needs more fill brought in and no way are big trucks going to do that if the ground isn't hard-dry. (This is the route my five stone trucks came in and that pile of topsoil far-right was out of "my hole"...some was put back as backfill in the previous photos)

    IMG_1476.jpg
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    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #243
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    61,354
    Building a shop isn't just about the building...it's about some of the in-built systems, too. In that respect, I made a decision relative to dust collection that surprised me a little since it was different than I expected. Historically, I've had Oneida cyclones right from the year 2000. Three of them if you count the SDD I'm currently using in the temporary shop. I've been uber happy with the company and the products, although I'll admit the SDD with the Delta 1.5hp isn't what I'm used to. But this time around, after a lot of thought, I've chosen the Harvey Gyro-Air. There are several reasons that entered into this including sound level, compactness vs performance and finally cost. The lower sound level means I can eschew building a sound-reduced room for the unit which lowers my interior build-out cost and takes less usable space away. It's small enough I can keep it closer to the tools with some careful workflow arrangement (not much different than has already been contemplated) which in turn reduces ductwork length and cost. The icing on the cake was the sale price. It would have been less a year ago, but still...total cost of the unit with lift-gate shipping and tax is just a bit more than half what I likely would have spent with my current vendor. Folks actually using the unit have been impressed but also straight about the little things they would have preferred to be different...and I can live with those things.

    Since I bought it now for the sale price, I'm actually going to instal it in the temp shop. The space is available and running a sorta-kinda-temporary dedicated circuit for it will be fast and easy as I already have the materials available.

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    Other thoughts and planning have been going on, too, including how I'll likely handle the ceiling given spray foam is unfortunately out of the question at the present time due to elevated costs and some consideration around multiple ways to do certain things which will influence some tool and workstation choices. I might as well think about these things now since it beats staring at the nice flat stone pad where the building will eventually go. LOL
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    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #244
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    But this time around, after a lot of thought, I've chosen the Harvey Gyro-Air.
    Congratulations. I also bought a Gyro-Air over a an Oneida and it's been great.

  5. #245
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    61,354
    Quote Originally Posted by derek labian View Post
    Congratulations. I also bought a Gyro-Air over a an Oneida and it's been great.
    I'm glad to hear that, Derek. I'm looking forward to "something different" here. The reviews have been good and I like the way then engineered things. Relative to this, I took care of putting in a circuit in the temporary shop so I can plug it in and use it there since realistically, it will be late fall before I likely will have the new shop building to the point that I can actually use it as a shop, even informally. The front, right corner where I have the current SDD setup has the space to slip the G700 into without causing a problem for the J/P and I'll just use a short hose to temporarily connect it to the existing 5" duct I have in the space. The unit has already been passed to the carrier so it just has to make its way to the east coast for delivery.
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    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #246
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Longmont, CO
    Posts
    798
    a little inspiration, just need concrete! and they ordered the doors without windows and have to switch out a panel on each once it arrives. PXL_20220707_232907434.jpg

  7. #247
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    That looks really nice, Adam! Congrats! It's a good color choice, too...one I would enjoy for sure. Here, in a suburban neighborhood, it was best to match the house so the nod went to taupe with beige trim and a bronze roof. The big overhead door will get painted taupe to "disappear" while the man-door will get hunter green to match the house's front door. Gutters will match the trim color...'had to pay extra for that.
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    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #248
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Longmont, CO
    Posts
    798
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    That looks really nice, Adam! Congrats! It's a good color choice, too...one I would enjoy for sure. Here, in a suburban neighborhood, it was best to match the house so the nod went to taupe with beige trim and a bronze roof. The big overhead door will get painted taupe to "disappear" while the man-door will get hunter green to match the house's front door. Gutters will match the trim color...'had to pay extra for that.
    thanks. we are planning on matching the house and other buildings to this color scheme also. right now its all 90s brown shades. this green blends in nice to the landscape here.

  9. #249
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    61,354
    That will be really nice, Adam. At our old property, when we put up the addition, we chose a darker green/brown cement siding for both the addition and the rest of the house where it wasn't stone. The shop building got painted the same color. What was really great was how well it just blended into the landscape and property and given it was a large home structure, it made it more pleasing by not seeming so large. The house is lighter in color here, but it's also less than half the size.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #250
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    61,354
    Along the same lines of purchasing the new dust collection system now because of a good sale price, I just ordered a new slider to replace the one I sold last summer to another 'Creeker in lieu of paying store it and move it twice. The lead time for the slider puts delivery after the building is up and has a floor, so that will work just fine. I opted for the SC3C as it has everything I'm used to, including compatibility with fixtures I previously made for the S315WS, but with a slightly shorter stroke. I've truly missed having the slider since I moved into the temporary shop...the cabinet saw works but I find it so limiting, especially for crosscutting things that are more than "x" inches wide. Using the track saw is an effective alternative, but I don't have the space to keep my MFT set up for convenient use and while the bare track is absolutely as accurate as I can measure and place it, repeatability is easier with the MFT setup. It's a dance, in other words. At any rate, I'm looking forward to being able to get back to the methods and workflow I'm used to and enjoy.
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    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #251
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Location
    Waynesboro, PA
    Posts
    4
    Might consider having your electrical figured out before the concrete pour so any grounding requirements can be incorporated into the pad.

  12. #252
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    61,354
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Mako View Post
    Might consider having your electrical figured out before the concrete pour so any grounding requirements can be incorporated into the pad.
    Already planned two months ago. The only variable I'm still working on is physical placement of conduit to the centerline, but that will be resolved prior to the build and floor pour. None of my equipment has any special grounding needs.
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    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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