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Thread: Shop Build...should be a fun journey...

  1. #766
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    The lathe install is perfect but everything else has got to go; its all wrong! . The shop is shaping up great Jim. I am loving the ride-a-long.
    "Never underestimate the power of negative people in large groups." - George Carlin (paraphrased)

  2. #767
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    I'm glad you like the headless lathe, Glenn. It sure is pretty!

    I'm also glad that folks find riding along interesting and useful.
    ----

    Today looks like wading through a whole bunch of dust collection ductwork components and even installing some.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #768
    It looks like a commercial shop that needs about two employees. You hiring?

  4. #769
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Wilson View Post
    It looks like a commercial shop that needs about two employees. You hiring?
    LOL. The "business" phase is gone...this is for me to enjoy, but I suspect I'll occasionally do a few little things for two specific people 'cause I like them and they do interesting things.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #770
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    Well, alrighty now...dust collection was the name of the game today, taking all of this...

    IMG_3662.jpg IMG_3664.jpg

    ...and incorporating it into what I already pre-installed with the components I had in the temporary gara-shop. "In general", working with quick connect ductwork is both easy and honestly pretty much a pleasure. Blastgate Company packed things pretty carefully including wrapping every end of every component with bubble wrap.

    IMG_3663.jpg

    I started things out with the vertical section that is a few feet off the collector and head up into the trusses. To insure that it "bottomed out" at the correct level, I made a temporary little jig/fixture and screwed it to the baseboard. The 90 elbow at the bottom of the run rested on this while I got things assembled. While it would have been nice to do an angled ascent into the clouds, that just wasn't practical with the space and setup, so vertical it is.

    IMG_3667.jpg IMG_3668.jpg

    From there, I worked the main duct over to where it joined with the previously installed materials. This was honestly pretty tricky and I had to lift up the drop to the jointer/planer and bandsaw a couple inches to make things come together in an even plane. In hindsight, doing the drops after the mains is likely easier, but I kinda had to do the pre-assembly in order to determine what I needed to buy...chicken and egg problem, more or less.

    IMG_3669.jpg

    I inadvertently ordered an extra 6x6x4 wye but that was honestly fortuitous as it gives me the branch that I can later extend to where I "think" the lathe might go. It will just get capped off for now as it can be extended later with ease if I determine I need and want that drop.

    IMG_3670.jpg

    One thing that's important to do once things are hooked together is to tighten the adjustment screw on the clamps for all the "permanent" connections...a 7/16" socket or wrench takes care of that...as that further reduces any risk of leakage. For a hose that will get connected and disconnected frequently, adjusting that nut has to be done by testing so that a happy medium between "tight" and "easily usable" is met. The clamps get really tight when you crank down that adjustment.

    IMG_3671.jpg
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #771
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    At the end of the afternoon, I had almost everything installed...nice, considering I didn't actually start working on it until about 2:30, other than the unboxing, etc,. before lunch. I have one piece of 5" to cut down to join up the drop for the table saw to the network left to tackle tomorrow. I need a few small doo-dads to fully complete the work and will get those ordered tomorrow, too. That includes a short piece I need so I can complete the drop over the CNC machine.

    This is the view from the back of the shop to where the end "convenience" drop is on the ceiling. You can see that short section that I'll deal with tomorrow to the left.

    IMG_3672.jpg

    And said "convenience" drop. This can be used for the downdraft setup, the drum sander, whatever. It's still up far enough that it will not get in the way of anything.

    IMG_3673.jpg
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #772
    Just want to thank you for all this detail, Jim. It is very helpful.

    Sal
    Thanks,
    Sal

  8. #773
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    Got quite a bit of work done today revolving primarily around the dust collection system. Um..."It's alive!!". I still have a few things on order to "complete complete", but a little Gorilla tape to close off two 4" ports that are not necessary for operation and stealing a hose adapter from my portable hose to complete the CNC connection got the job done. First thing up was to cut down and install that last link to the table saw drop.

    IMG_3680.jpg

    Next up was to set things up so that the link to the G700 from the main duct would have some support while dealing with the connections...the Freud biscuit jointer got tapped for that. A non-traditional use for sure and no electricity used, but support the duct it did. After a little cleanup, I moved the G700 into its spot and hooked things up. I am truly lucky, despite not getting a single number on both Mega Millions and Powerball this week...the length of the 6x6x4 wye, the two 45 elbows and the machine adapter were perfect. BTW, the reason for the 6x6x4 in that spot is to provide a "filter cleanout" feedback loop with a hose to use with the G700. Bent's Woodworking set things up this way and it makes the occasional job easier.

    IMG_3681.jpg IMG_3686.jpg IMG_3689.jpg

    Hooked up the CNC drop with the ball housing. After this picture was taken, I revisited things and made a few changes. Temporarily, the blast gate is at the machine, but that means the ball housing leaks like a sieve when the gate is closed. The gate really needs to be in front of the ball housing...nature of the beast...so I ordered a single iVac gate to install up in the ceiling that I'll trigger with a simple switch near the computer when I need collection for the CNC. There's no practical way to operate a gate that's 10' up in the air. Using a ladder is not practical for sure. Using a stick could work, but there would be no way to tighten the gate up with the screw between uses. So I spent more money...fancy electric blast gate $130 and two machine adapters for the quick connect duct work at about $18 a pop. It is what it is...

    IMG_3682.jpg

    Table saw connection merely involved shortening the hose and installing the hose adapter so it could clamp into the drop.

    IMG_3687.jpg

    Where the duct would be in contact with a truss or other hard structure, I used some dense, but soft foam material I had lying about to cushion things so there would be no noise from any potential vibration.

    IMG_3684.jpg

    Overall, I'm very pleased with this duct work installation. The cost was not pretty, but I had saved the money from selling my previous Oneida cyclone specifically to cover much of the cost. The ease of installation and quality of the product is there so I have no regrets for making the decision to go with quick connect from Blastgate Company. They are really nice to do business with, too, and get stuff out fast.

    IMG_3683.jpg
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 01-16-2023 at 8:25 PM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #774
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    After completing the work on the dust collection system and checking that everything worked properly, I moved on to some cleanup and organization. Taking advantage of the "wall side" exposure of the table saw, I fitted up some accommodations to be able to store the outrigger and some other components on the end of the right side table and on the post that brings the electric and dust collection from the ceiling. No actual wall space was harmed here and everything is right there when needed.

    IMG_3688.jpg

    I set out some of the mats and also placed the main bench where I think it's going to live, at least for the present. It needed to be off its mobility wheels so it would provide a stable surface for some coming projects, but can be moved easily if necessary. Things are definitely coming together.

    IMG_3690.jpg

    The OmniWall stuff I ordered should be arriving tomorrow so the "bench wall" will get more development in the coming days. It appears that cheap, basic shelf supports will click in to the grid...something I'll obviously test once I have the OmniWall product in hand...and that will hopefully help with making a whole bunch of things for hand-tools and other items without having to reinvent the wheel. I can just cut down the cheap shelf supports to make brackets and once they are painted, they will disappear. They will not be used in the traditional "shelf" way...just as components for the things I'll be making.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #775
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    ... so I ordered a single iVac gate to install up in the ceiling that I'll trigger with a simple switch near the computer when I need collection for the CNC.
    Jim, does iVac sell a gate that works with quick connect duct work, or will you have to put adapters of some sort on both sides of the gate?
    And there was trouble, taking place...

  11. #776
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I set out some of the mats...Things are definitely coming together.
    Jim, what kind of mats did you get, and from where? Thanks

  12. #777
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    ...so I ordered a single iVac gate to install up in the ceiling that I'll trigger with a simple switch near the computer when I need collection for the CNC. There's no practical way to operate a gate that's 10' up in the air. Using a ladder is not practical for sure. Using a stick could work, but there would be no way to tighten the gate up with the screw between uses.
    I would have invested in a Grit Automation system for that, but clearly more expensive as you would have needed a hub too. Then you'd be tempted to put them on all the gates, and $$$. But they do work with quick disconnect duct work, as that's what I have in my shop with Nordfab. No way I'd be building that beautiful a shop and use a stick to open/close a gate.

    You're using the Blastgate Nordfab clone, right Jim?
    Last edited by Alan Lightstone; 01-17-2023 at 9:08 AM.
    - Its not that Im so smart, its just that I stay with problems longer. Albert Einstein
    - Welcome to Florida. Where the old folks visit their parents

  13. #778
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Jim, The shop is looking great and this looks like the perfect setup and backdrop for a new U-tube channel. Camera out to the right, facing back towards that nice looking workbench.

  14. #779
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Wurster View Post
    Jim, does iVac sell a gate that works with quick connect duct work, or will you have to put adapters of some sort on both sides of the gate?
    Need to machine adapters for the gate which I'll order from Blastgate Company once I have the iVac gate to precisely measure the port diameters. Blastgate Company has a machine that adjusts the ID of the adapters to slip over the "machine" port...ports vary in exact size. For example, the machine adapter for the G700 was sized to 5.89" ID which made for a slip fit that can easily be sealed with foil tape.

    Quote Originally Posted by Patty Hann View Post
    Jim, what kind of mats did you get, and from where? Thanks
    They are the matts from my old shop and are being reused. I don't have budget to replace them. They were purchased over the years from a large, industrial supply company, but for personal reasons, I do not buy from them anymore nor will I promote their business. (It's not about the product...it's excellent)

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lightstone View Post
    I would have invested in a Grit Automation system for that, but clearly more expensive as you would have needed a hub too. Then you'd be tempted to put them on all the gates, and $$$. But they do work with quick disconnect duct work, as that's what I have in my shop with Nordfab. No way I'd be building that beautiful a shop and use a stick to open/close a gate.

    You're using the Blastgate Nordfab clone, right Jim?
    Blastgate Company duct. Much less expensive than Nordfab branded product but equivalent and compatible, other than you cannot share adjustable sleeves between them.

    I have no interest in fully automating the gates...there's no value in that "for me", but I can appreciate that others may feel great value, particularly when gates are harder to access. This is a one-off solution for that singular gate since I'm not ten feet tall. The iVac gate can work with a simple on/off switch and doesn't need to be tied to any hub or controller or contactor for this application. They conveniently support manual operation. So aside from the $130 gate and a couple of machine adapters, I just need a 3.5mm stereo plug, a length of wire and a simple switch. Since the affordable gate is made of plastic, I'll have to jump it with a ground wire that also connects to the provided grounding lug, especially for this run given static can be a serious issue for CNC operation. While there is no ground connection to the CNC machine, the duct has to be fully grounded.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #780
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I'll have to jump it with a ground wire that also connects to the provided grounding lug, especially for this run given static can be a serious issue for CNC operation. While there is no ground connection to the CNC machine, the duct has to be fully grounded.
    Interesting. Why is static a serious issue for CNC operation? Expensive electronics?
    - Its not that Im so smart, its just that I stay with problems longer. Albert Einstein
    - Welcome to Florida. Where the old folks visit their parents

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