Page 40 of 55 FirstFirst ... 3036373839404142434450 ... LastLast
Results 586 to 600 of 819

Thread: Shop Build...should be a fun journey...

  1. #586
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    62,698
    LOL, "Nineteen and two thirds inches".

    Even though in hindsight I should have thought about using the metric tapes for the drywall exercise, it would have broken the "don't mix measuring systems in a project" rule, at least for the overall project. Then again, it would have been limited to a single operation and therefore, it wouldn't have mattered or brought any real risk. In fact, it would have been less risky given the circumstances. But in the end, all worked out with all the holes in the correct places and tight enough to the boxes that I'm not going to have to slather a lot of mud to close anything up.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #587
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Houston, Texas area
    Posts
    1,308
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Mark, 4x8x.5" lightweight. Not fire rated...not required for this application as there's no connection to residence. Non lightweight is less expensive by a few bucks but...nobody stocks it.
    Wow, drywall is now stupid expensive (like wire).
    Mark McFarlane

  3. #588
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    62,698
    Quote Originally Posted by mark mcfarlane View Post
    Wow, drywall is now stupid expensive (like wire).
    Price has come down a lot...it was quite a bit higher earlier in the year. Lumber is also down. Plywood (construction type) has moderated but is still pricey. Wire is really "up there".
    ----

    I'm proclaiming the drywall physical install to be officially complete as of today. Time to start the tape and mud dance.

    I mentioned previously that there were two outlets up high; one for the air cleaner (switched) and one for the compressor (also switched via contactor). So that there can be a clean look for these two elements, I added a small amount of drywall around them to allow for transition from the sound-mitigation stuff to a normal outlet and cover without having to deal with box extension, etc, due to the thickness of sound absorption materials that might be near them. Here's an example: (air cleaner)

    IMG_3118.jpg

    And here's a short 360 video of the room as it stands now with the 'rock up and ready for the tape and mud.

    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #589
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Trenton SC, in the CSRA
    Posts
    408
    Bam! And, a few more words to make this portable.

  5. #590
    How will the window and door trim work? It appears the sheetrock extends over the jamb. Will you add a trim box inside the window or door opening? And then apply molding to the edge of the box?

  6. #591
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    62,698
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Wilson View Post
    How will the window and door trim work? It appears the sheetrock extends over the jamb. Will you add a trim box inside the window or door opening? And then apply molding to the edge of the box?
    Jams are not installed yet. That white on the right side of the door is packing to bring it out so that the jam fits the door evenly all around. The builder installed the door hard screwed to the left rough opening instead of centering it in the opening which offset it about .75" to the left. I'll install jams for the door and windows after the room is painted. I plan on using the technique that Kyle from RR Buildings uses for these elements which basically is to pre-construct them, including casing, before slipping them into place and using his leveling/alignment technique, too. He recently posted a video on this specific topic. I can pre-finish them this way, too. I have not yet decided on material for this.
    ------

    I will likely get started with mud work sometime today, but I have limited time available due to some other obligations. I'll start with the "more difficult", but fortunately few, small butt joints and other fixes as they require an additional coat, given the limited time and then do the major, but easier, work after that. And no, I'm not doing corners with mud in this shop space. I plan on using a small molding to close the minimal gap (I took my time scribing things tight) and that will get caulked to clean it up. I wouldn't do this in a house ever, but in this space, it's a big time saver.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 11-25-2022 at 12:07 PM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #592
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    N CA
    Posts
    1,089
    Jim, I assume you are going to paint your newly finished sheet rock. I would suggest the Benjamin Moore Scuff-X paint. We used it in the kitchen and my daughter hadd her house done with it. Our painter suggested it and we are very happy with it. Paint costs are through the roof too.

  8. #593
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    62,698
    Jack, yes, it will be painted. But no, it will not be expensive paint. It will likely be from the ReStore or the less expensive Glidden or Valspar from the home center. I'm really not concerned too much about it given the use case for the building. In my house, I do the "good stuff" from SW.
    ----

    I finally got started on the mud yesterday...'got tied up with errands on Friday and had a visitor for part of the day on Saturday. So really only about an hour and a half so far. Since I was working on using up the remainder of compound in a small container before tapping the big one, I ran all the screws and did the first coat on the little bump-out as well as the butts up above the person door. Hopefully, I can get the first coat on all the rest of the joints today.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #594
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    62,698
    First coat done all around with a second coat on the screws and a few of the tougher joints up high on the front wall.

    IMG_3145.jpg
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #595
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    62,698
    The understandably heavier first coat of joint compound was not fully dry yet and it was not safe to scrape ridges and move to the second coat. So I spent a bunch of time culling and milling a pile of the salvaged trim boards from the house that used to be next door to use as baseboard for the project. I chose to use the thickness planer to skim off the finish and other nastiness and also to "thickness" the whole stack to a uniform width. No table saw is currently available to rip for that, so I made fluffy shavings instead. About 20% of the material was actually d-fir from "way back in the day".

    IMG_3148.jpg IMG_3149.jpg IMG_3150.jpg

    And then I installed it. The drywall was held a half inch off the concrete and this trim was held a quarter inch off the concrete. That makes masking for paint easy and doesn't leave any untreated wood touching the concrete floor. The pieces in the area when my lumber storage will go were installed with screws so I can easily remove it and resize based on how I decide to do said storage.

    IMG_3151.jpg IMG_3152.jpg IMG_3153.jpg IMG_3154.jpg

    This will all be the same color as the walls and adds just a little bit of "protection" down low.

    I will be able to do the second coat of mud tomorrow based on how things looked at the end of the day.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 11-28-2022 at 9:19 PM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #596
    Do you have a metal detector to check recycled material for nails? If so, what kind?

  12. #597
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Piercefield, NY
    Posts
    1,333
    It looks great in there. I don't envy you the drywall work. I had enough of that on the house project this summer to satisfy my drywalling urges for some time to come. Did you use old knives in the planer, or do you have ones that are tough enough not to be dulled by the paint? It's a nice thing to reuse the wood like that.

  13. #598
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    62,698
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Wilson View Post
    Do you have a metal detector to check recycled material for nails? If so, what kind?
    I have an old Wizard detector. I did use it just to be sure, but I had already done metal removal earlier in the year before I stacked the stuff. Not much more of it will be usable, however, as the tarp over it leaked. So I'll be cutting it in to short pieces to dispose of once I'm sure I've salvaged all I can. I do not want to bring any kind of mold into the shop or house...

    ----
    Zachary, the side of the Tersa knives I've been using with the reclaimed material are pretty much shot, but I'm not going to flip them until I'm sure I'm done with any remaining sticks I can process/clean. I do have a few more that I can likely use, but most remaining is wet as I noted in my reply to Thomas earlier in this post.

    ----
    I'm heading out to the shop soon to put up the corner molding (a little half-round) and then start working on the next coat of the compound, which will be the final coat in most places, but not all.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #599
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    62,698
    Second coat of compound went on today. A third will be required on a few places up high, but otherwise, the application is complete. Only a little sanding will be required and then I can prepare for painting.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #600
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    N. Idaho
    Posts
    1,424
    Jim, the shop is looking great and I continued to be impressed with your pace. Glad to hear the sheetrock work is going smoothly--one of those tasks that is tedious to be sure!

    Best,
    Chris
    "You can observe a lot just by watching."
    --Yogi Berra

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •