Page 14 of 17 FirstFirst ... 41011121314151617 LastLast
Results 196 to 210 of 243

Thread: Shop Build...should be a fun journey...

  1. #196
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    21,768
    Blog Entries
    1
    At first I was wondering why the DC was so far from the slider. I then realized that the ping-pong table was a CNC . You are lucky in that you already have a slider-to-wall-position use case from your old shop. I also had the right side of my tablesaw as a no-man's-land long enough that I work without the need for that space. This gave me an ideal location for my DC and power drop and it has worked out well. Our past work flows really tell us the things that worked and the things that did not. I went a bit overboard on a few items that were in the "did not" column. I felt a little selfish and excessive at the time. After working in the shop for awhile I am sooo glad I was a little selfish. Things that seem like little extravagances at the time turn out to be the things that make time in the shop a joy. I won't be building another shop so I am glad I pushed forward on this one.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  2. #197
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    60,937
    Mark, venting outside isn't going to happen because this will be conditioned space, but yes, I'll be doing careful calculations to insure the return air is appropriate for whatever DC system I end up choosing, likely Oneida 3 or 5 hp system. I will likely do the sound reduction the same way I did in the old shop, filling the walls with insulation and then capping with rought-side-out pegboard on the inside.

    Leigh, I considered the big door location carefully. The building folks actually default them to center line. For more than one reason, the 8x8 door was best located offset to that side because of the property layout and future access. I do not intend to have it open much and the tools will not actually be near it if things go as I expect them to end up. It will also be a better view from the house once the big door is painted the same as the building walls so it "disappears". The slider in the drawing is the "big" one I used to own. I'll likely have a short stroke this time around as it more than meets my needs.]

    Glann, as noted, no tools have been positioned in this initial image. My intent, however, is to figure out how to best position the big tools for both workflow and to keep the duct network as small and short as possible. That's both for performance and for cost since I'm doing clamp-together duct.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 05-15-2022 at 12:08 PM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #198
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    60,937
    More mental gymnastics around potentially how to arrange things "in general". Note, I took the slider out of the picture for the moment as the model is for the larger machine I used to own and the new one will be a short stroke with a little smaller footprint. The PCS from the temporary shop is filling in for the moment. One thing is clear and that's the need for in-floor electrical because doing two "islands" is going to result in the most efficient arrangement. I want to keep the space near the big door open because it will be the finishing area with a knock down "booth" setup if things go the way I'm thinking. Keeping the majority of dust makers closer to the DC is also a goal to reduce cost for duct work.

    ToolLayoutV2.jpg

    No word on the permit yet...at two weeks today.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #199
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Waterford, PA
    Posts
    1,121
    Jim. I like the layout you just posted. I find "zones" like you show to work well.

  5. #200
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    60,937
    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa Starr View Post
    Jim. I like the layout you just posted. I find "zones" like you show to work well.
    Yea, I'm somewhat comfortable with the idea...I could not do this at the old shop, but here, with a wide open space, I can better accommodate grouping for efficient power and dust collection networks as well as retain space. I'm not someone fond of lining the walls with things. While under floor power has a certain appeal, it does lock me into specific areas for those islands, whereas a properly done overhead drop is more flexible over time for, um...remodeling...which we all know happens from time to time.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #201
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    21,768
    Blog Entries
    1
    Looks like you are dialing it in. The shop machine layout probably got more mental percolation than any other part of my shop. I already had a vertical pathway defined by the dust collection duct work. I ran my electrical over head as opposed to in the floor. So far I have been happy with this.

    New Shop (372).jpgNew Shop (473).jpgNew Shop (472).jpg

    Your BS, JP, and DS island could use a center drop duct as shown in the last pic above. The challenge there was positioning the gates so they were easily reachable .

    New Shop (366).jpg

    I left everything loose so I could swivel things around with the machines in place. Once I was happy I fastened and sealed everything. So far, so good.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  7. #202
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    60,937
    TIME TO BREAK GROUND for the new shop building. My permit is approved and I just have to pick it up (and pay for it) when it physically reaches the Borough office from the engineering firm that does the building/zoning work for the jurisdiction.

    The timing is good as Chris, a contractor neighbor who owns what is now a lot next door with the demolition of the building yesterday and today, will have a trackhoe here in the next week and needs fill to clean things up after the demolition folks are all done. He's going to help dig out the area for my shop with the larger machine in exchange for the excess material and my help next door which will mean a easier job for my "big orange power tool". Getting this all done now is earlier than physically necessary because I suspect scheduling with the builder will put things easily into late July at this point due to the wait for the engineered plans followed by three and a half weeks for the permit, but when there's a big machine available, I'm going to take advantage.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #203
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Longmont, CO
    Posts
    795
    congrats Jim. nice a quick.

  9. #204
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    60,937
    I can now say that I have officially broken ground for this project...this afternoon, as a matter of fact. It was hotter than "that place" out today, but I was getting bored staying in the AC and watching videos, so I fired up the Big Orange Power Tool and started moving some dirt. I'm going to be restoring the hydraulic pressure a bit when one more thing I need arrives and that should help with the job, too...after about 20 years, the pressure relief valve needs some shims to get things back to where they need to be.

    IMG_1358.jpg
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #205
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    McKinney, TX
    Posts
    1,930
    Congrats Jim. Bet it feels good to get started.
    Steve Jenkins, McKinney, TX. 469 742-9694
    Always use the word "impossible" with extreme caution

  11. #206
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    60,937
    Thanks, Steve. The downside is that I'm going to be staring at a flat stone rectangle for several months... LOL
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #207
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
    Posts
    3,365
    Blog Entries
    1
    I'm sure you'll manage

  13. #208
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Waterford, PA
    Posts
    1,121
    Progress!!!! I'm sure it feels good to be starting the build, even if it just a baby step for now. Congrats.

  14. #209
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Longmont, CO
    Posts
    795
    we finally have started today as well! drilling holes for the poles, but will have to wait on concrete till Friday and framing will start Monday.

  15. #210
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    60,937
    Pretty much thought I had the excavation job done today, but my contractor neighbor suggested I take the whole thing down about a foot to be sure all the organics are gone, particularly because we have very poor drainage in this neighborhood. He has 45 years of building and excavation experience (he was running a big machine next door today while I was doing my thing) and pretty much said that a few hundred dollars of more stone will not hurt...plus he offered me for free all the modified stone that was under the paved driveway next door that being peeled back and disposed of for recycling. So I'll be back on the Big Orange Power Tool tomorrow taking the rest of the material out. It's all being used for fill next door now that the house is completely gone. That big pile in the first photo is what I've removed and moved over there...so far. The big machine shows scale.

    IMG_1363.jpg

    IMG_1364.jpg

    IMG_1365.jpg

    IMG_1366.jpg

    BTW, with a small machine like my BX-22, this work is too much to do with just the FEL (loader bucket). Breaking things up with the backhoe first makes life so much easier. Big machines can do this all very fast, but a little machine is still capable of the work if one is patient and works things in ways that provide the best advantage.

    Adam, that's very exciting! Sadly, I suspect my actual build will not happen until late July or early August...still waiting on scheduling. My drilling will also get done a day or three prior to the build because there's a required inspection. That way, when the crew arrives to do their thing, they can get the whole structure up and finished, from their point of view, in a day and a half to two days. Post frame structures like this go up extremely fast!
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 06-01-2022 at 7:47 PM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •