Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 27

Thread: Restoring a de Havilland Mosquito

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    MT
    Posts
    507

    Restoring a de Havilland Mosquito

    There is a pretty neat article in the Jan/Feb issue of Popular Mechanics about restoring a Mosquito.

    For those unfamiliar with this airplane it was constructed almost entirely from wood. Fuselage was a 5/8" thick sandwich of plywood and balsa!!

    That, combined with two RR Merlins made it a versatile, and fast airplane.

    Article is fairly short and doesn't go into that much detail on the woodworking side but interesting read nonetheless.
    Regards,

    Kris

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
    Location
    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
    Posts
    726
    Blog Entries
    1
    There are several good youTube videos about the Mosquito. Thanks Kris! I will check that out.

    I can view P.M. digitaly for free when I log in to our local library.
    Last edited by Maurice Mcmurry; 02-18-2022 at 8:37 AM. Reason: Available through our Library
    Best Regards, Maurice

  3. #3
    Here's the Wikipedia article on the Mosquito.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  4. #4
    De Havillands are awesome! We caught a flight out of Seattle on a Beaver seaplane last fall. The pilot let my wife ride shotgun.

    Erik
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Ex-SCM and Felder rep

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
    Location
    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
    Posts
    726
    Blog Entries
    1
    Aviation and History should have been lumped together in school. I would have gotten better grades. I recently read The Wright Brothers by David McCullough. The rave reviews of the book fall short. It is a thick history book that is a page turner all the way through. David McCullough has a short story called Treasure from the Carpentry Shop, its not about airplanes, nor does it have much about Carpentry, but is also recommended.
    Last edited by Maurice Mcmurry; 02-18-2022 at 10:53 AM.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    7,395
    I. do not remember the details but during WW2 the Neighbors wife worked in a factory in Saint Louis ? building a small plane out of wood using special oven cured glue. She watched it take off and fall apart in flight because they did not cure the glue properly.
    Bill D.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
    Location
    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
    Posts
    726
    Blog Entries
    1
    Eric, Those are great images! Surely that hour meeter has rolled over.

    Bill, regarding Saint Louis:

    https://aboutstlouis.com/local/histo...b8M_ZCg.google
    Last edited by Maurice Mcmurry; 02-18-2022 at 11:41 AM. Reason: St Louis
    Best Regards, Maurice

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Maurice Mcmurry View Post
    Eric, Those are great images! Surely that hour meeter has rolled over...
    No doubt, Maurice. On that same trip, we flew back on a De Havilland Otter (larger version of Beaver). Both had all sorts of retrofitted modern electronics.

    Erik

    B93F3F0A-FA1C-4D5B-8C85-0AD752358F2A.JPEG
    Ex-SCM and Felder rep

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Erik Loza View Post
    De Havillands are awesome! We caught a flight out of Seattle on a Beaver seaplane last fall. ...
    A co-worker flew out of Vancouver Seaplane base on a Beaver and told me they were getting worried because the pilot was adding oil to the engine just before flight. I assured him he need only worry when the pilot tries to add oil while in flight.

    (All radials burn some oil; nature of the beast. Watch the crew do a pre-flight prop pull-thru to clear oil from lower cylinders on the CAF's B-29!)

    ETA _ They have all electric Beavers operating out of Vancouver now, too.
    Last edited by Malcolm McLeod; 02-18-2022 at 1:09 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
    Location
    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
    Posts
    726
    Blog Entries
    1
    Oh dear. The story about the Regency Hotel balcony collapse in K.C. is in this issue of P.M. That was a big story around here. I remember it well. The Mosquito article has me wanting to read and see more. I have read some about the Sprue Goose too. It would be great to see one of these wooden wonders. I watched the movie Dunkirk twice. I plan on watching it again.
    Last edited by Maurice Mcmurry; 02-18-2022 at 2:42 PM.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
    Posts
    3,360
    Blog Entries
    1
    De Havilland is no more, but Viking Air bought the licensing to build the Twin Otter. I've done work in the Calgary factory where they still make them. The avionics & engines are modern, but the plane itself is much the same as it was back in the day. I was working on a lift 45' above a brand new $7,000,000 plane. Made me a little nervous.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    MT
    Posts
    507
    Quote Originally Posted by Maurice Mcmurry View Post
    Oh dear. The story about the Regency Hotel balcony collapse in K.C. is in this issue of P.M. That was a big story around here. I remember it well. The Mosquito article has me wanting to read and see more. I have read some about the Sprue Goose too. It would be great to see one of these wooden wonders. I watched the movie Dunkirk twice. I plan on watching it again.

    If you ever get near McMinnville Oregon the Spruce Goose is there at Evergreen's museum. Pretty Awesome. I have some pictures somewhere.
    Regards,

    Kris

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
    Location
    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
    Posts
    726
    Blog Entries
    1
    I would enjoy Evergreen's and the Spruce Goose. I made it to Portland once, got to see the Home Depot, it's just like ours. I revisited those Mosquito youTubes today as well as some on the P-38. Fun stuff for an armchair Aviator.
    Best Regards, Maurice

  14. #14
    Seems like I remember the Misquito being fast enough to fly down and destroy a V-1 buzz bomber rocket.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Wrenn View Post
    Seems like I remember the Mosquito being fast enough to fly down and destroy a V-1 buzz bomber rocket.
    A pilot of a British Spitfire could fly next to a V-1 and then flip it by putting its wing under the V-1 wing and starting a roll. The V-1 would not recover from that nudge.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •