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Thread: wooden ac condenser base?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Houston, TX
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    436

    wooden ac condenser base?

    So my current ac condenser for my house is sitting on two crappy pallets stacked on top of one another and only about 12" off the ground. I made a nice wooden base for it with treated 2x10" for a skirt and then 2x4 for it to set on. It's like a mini platform the same size as that concrete pad they put under ac condensers. I live by the water, so the plan is to get the condenser about 3ft off the ground instead of only 12" After I built this thing I started to wonder if all the wood I put in this thing will cause it to float away?? lol I forgot the measurements but its like 48"X48" I think by the time they put the condenser on top and still utilize the concrete pad it should be okay??? I'll try and take some pics. I'd hate to have my condenser float away. lol I made this thing for when the old unit breaks and I'll have the installers place the new one on it.

    Opinions? Maybe I should take some 2x4's out and do every other 2x4 to make it less bouyant? Do you think the ac installer will have an issue with placing it on my home made platform? I believe code requires it to be 12" above ground and they typically use 4 cinder blocks under one of those concrete pads then place the condenser on top. Not sure if code requires concrete cinder blocks or if that's just what they use because they're only like $.79ea
    Last edited by Keith Outten; 01-26-2022 at 8:13 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
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    7,240
    Put a couple drop anchors at opposite corners into the slab. Run all thread up to hold down the compressor so it does not walk off the platform. Or use chain. Here I would be more worried about scrap thieves taking it at night.
    Bill D

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Atlanta
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    1,152
    I’d check to see if a wooden base on the ground meets code. Even if it does , I wouldn’t use it.

    I don’t see much point in worrying about whether the condenser will “float” away in a surge or flood. If the water is that deep, you’ve got lots of other problems to worry about.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
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    3,091
    Being on the water, the code here is that the condensers need to be 6' off the ground, on metal bases attached to the side of the cinder block.

    As Houston is hurricane prone, and has flooding issues, I'd personally go higher and more secure than 3 feet.
    - Its not that Im so smart, its just that I stay with problems longer. Albert Einstein
    - Welcome to Florida. Where the old folks visit their parents

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Western Nebraska
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Conner View Post
    Not sure if code requires concrete cinder blocks or if that's just what they use because they're only like $.79ea
    just for kicks, CMU are around $3.50 each now. $.79 is a price from the good old days.

  6. #6
    My unit was 2 above Hurricane Sandy flood stage and only got splashed with salt water. AC guy was able to get it working, but thought it wouldnt last more than a year.
    Then somebody stole the unit as Bill D warned. Things to consider, good luck.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    60,627
    Around here, bases are either concrete or a molded composite material, or if wall mounted, metal. I honestly wouldn't use wood for this application.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Atlanta
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Rozmiarek View Post
    just for kicks, CMU are around $3.50 each now. $.79 is a price from the good old days.

    I paid less than $2 last month for a few.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    NW Arkansas
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    Nope, wood? Treated or otherwise is a bad idea. Metal would be way better, Get some strut material, cheap, and won't rot.
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  10. #10
    Friend's house, a block off the ocean, has them mounted on a small deck, about even with second story of house. It's the code there to have them mounted up above typical flood level.

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