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Thread: Edge/Flush Trimming Jigs

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
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    Edge/Flush Trimming Jigs

    I have an upcoming project involving of A LOT of plywood panels with applied hardwood edging that will need to be flush trimmed. I know there are a bunch of different ways to do this and I have used several different methods in the past. Im interested in building a jig to make the whole process more efficient, so show me your favorite jigs!
    There is a very fine line between hobby and mental illness. - Dave Barry

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    For me the best is simply a piece of flat 3/4" ply, mounted to the table saw fence vertically about an inch above the table.
    Position the fence so the blade is under the plywood and flush with the edge. Pass the piece on edge, nosing down and flip it around to do both sides.

    You can set up the same thing on a router table.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    No jig. Flush trim bit in a palm router. Clamp the panel vertical so that the router can stand on the banding. Hold the router near the base to avoid tilting it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Dave Zellers is onto it. I do the same, except the jig is router table mounted. Quick to fabricate; easy to use.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Zellers View Post
    For me the best is simply a piece of flat 3/4" ply, mounted to the table saw fence vertically about an inch above the table.
    Position the fence so the blade is under the plywood and flush with the edge. Pass the piece on edge, nosing down and flip it around to do both sides.

    You can set up the same thing on a router table.
    This can work if the plywood is straight. If the plywood is curved (as so much seems to be these days), the blade is going to not be flush at some part of the run. That's why I use a bearing-guided flush trim router bit. It stays flush to the ply's face even if the play is warped.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie Buxton View Post
    This can work if the plywood is straight. If the plywood is curved (as so much seems to be these days), the blade is going to not be flush at some part of the run. That's why I use a bearing-guided flush trim router bit. It stays flush to the ply's face even if the play is warped.
    Yes- good point. I've always had trouble keeping the router from tipping. I've never done this but on a router table you could pad out the tall fence right above the bit which would allow for some curve in the ply. Also use a bit with a bottom bearing.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    I just did a project with plywood and oak edging. I saw a review fir the FastCap Little Lipper and bought it. It worked great with my DeWalt trim router. I always had struggled trimming the edging and this was fantastic.

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Zellers View Post
    For me the best is simply a piece of flat 3/4" ply, mounted to the table saw fence vertically about an inch above the table.
    Position the fence so the blade is under the plywood and flush with the edge. Pass the piece on edge, nosing down and flip it around to do both sides.

    You can set up the same thing on a router table.
    Having trouble visualizing this, but sounds interesting.

    Any pictures with the workpiece on the plywood?

    Personally, I just use a handheld palm router, and yes, tipping is a concern.
    - Its not that Im so smart, its just that I stay with problems longer. Albert Einstein
    - Welcome to Florida. Where the old folks visit their parents

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Ouray Colorado
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    I have a portable flush trimmer but for large quantities I prefer the shaper. The feeder takes the worry out of bowed plywood. I use a rebate cutter with knickers to get a clean cut.
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  10. #10
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    Would love to see a picture of the cutter block you are using there Joe, thanks.

  11. #11
    This can work maybe with the Fast Cap jig, but a balancing act with a router is a very dangerous way to flush trim.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    West Lafayette, IN
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    Id for sure get the lipper. Cheapest easiest solution in my mind.

  13. #13
    there are lipping tools made for this which will out perform a router. I dont think a router is dangerous its just a tiny radius bit and will fall short compared to the proper tool for doing that. Depends on how much over hang you have to do, how much volume and how wide the edge is as well. Lipping tools can do solid over 2" wide

  14. #14
    I used to make cubbies and cabinets for local "Y's". Lots of 1/4" edge banding. I used trim router with a flush trim bit. With panels standing upright clamp two panels (same height) and a third (shorter) between them. This gave me extra support for router to prevent tipping. You could do them on the flat on the router table. Double stick tape a piece of plywood to table, with a cut out for bit. Leave a 1/4"-3/8" gap between fence and plywood. Lay panel on ply, and route right to left.

  15. #15
    I am on the same page as Joe - a laminate trimmer in a jig for a few panels (spindle parallel with the panel face), and the shaper with power feed for more pieces. I use a rabbeting cutter with scoring. Tipping a router on a narrow edge is an easy fail.

    Another simple setup is a half-width sub-base on a router with a straight cutter set flush with the bottom of the sub-base, climb cutting to avoid tearout at the edge.

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