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Thread: how would you make this chamfered edge?

  1. #16
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    For that big a hole I think you will have to look at insertable countersinks. Her eis a link to a one on ebay. The problem will be finding one with a small enough shank your drill press can grab it.
    The linked one looks like it uses standard inserts. It also looks like it can chamfer two different diameter holes. You may have to drill your holes to match the pilot then enlarge them after the chamfer operation.
    Bill D.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/26331299177...temCondition=4

    Idea on a tool you could make from wood with a plane blade.
    https://www.ferguson.com/product/ree...25/_/R-4190752
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 01-23-2022 at 2:33 AM.

  2. #17
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    Neat ideas, and neat tools! It is a small hole for the compass router idea. Like John, I am not sure I am getting the big picture. Will the holes be made in individual blocks? How about using a lathe? How about modifying a hole saw?

  3. #18
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    Here is a company that sells blanks if you want to try grinding your own profile. https://www.southeasttool.com/produc...router-blanks/

  4. #19
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    That is exactly the tool I was envisioning! Finding one with the right dimensions is the challenge. (I didn't mention that this organ is European, so everything is metric, to add to the complications). Oftentimes these pneumatic systems are ina fairly delicate balance, so you can't go changing dimensions and expect it to work as designed.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    For that big a hole I think you will have to look at insertable countersinks. Her eis a link to a one on ebay. The problem will be finding one with a small enough shank your drill press can grab it.
    Bill D.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/26331299177...temCondition=4

  5. #20
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    A bunch of great ideas to explore here, thank you! For further explanation here's a picture of a pouch board like this that I was in the process of re-leathering. You can see a couple of un-leathered wells at the left side, the rest have been covered with 0.01" thick leather, with a cardboard button glued in the center to push on the bottom of the valve stem. So in answer to several questions these are not individual squares but all in one long board. Exactly as in a player piano, as John noted.

    IMG_4221.jpg

    One issue with a square edged hole is that if you get a bit of squeeze out of glue when you put the leather down it can make a sharp edge that will, over time, cut the leather, causing a leak and failed note. That doesn't happen with the chamfer. At the same time it increases the area, and thus the power of the pouch to lift the valve without increasing the total volume of the well by much.

    Re-grinding a spade bit, or starting with one of those grindable router bits seems like a very practical, low tech and quick way to attack this. I'll probably attempt the spade bit route this morning and see how it goes. If I got really clever I suppose I could make both the hole and chamfer with an appropriately shaped spade bit; that may not be worth the extra effort and I'm not sure I'd like the quality of the resulting hole.

    I suggested that that a CNC machine would be a great addition to the shop to solve this problem, but DW was having none of it!

  6. #21
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    https://www.stltoday.com/lifestyles/...07184a0f5.html

    A bit off topic, There is an image of some wonderful workmanship.

  7. #22
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    I’d ask on the Neanderthal form. I suspect it was originally cut by hand.
    The Plane Anarchist

  8. #23
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    I would consider modifying a Forstner bit to provide the correct profile and drill and chamfer in a single pass. You would have to start with a larger bit in order to have adequate steel to modify.

    A local machine shop or company that sharpens end mills should be able to do the regrind for you.

  9. #24
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    I took the angle grinder to this old spade bit. no measuring, no sharpening, or refinements of any kind. I think this could work if done with care.

    IMG_0322.jpg

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maurice Mcmurry View Post
    Would a 45 degree bevel router bit with a bearing guide work? Intriguing project, I am interested!
    The chamfer will not be seen as covered by leather.

    Use a sharp knife to pare the edges.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  11. #26
    What about building a jig that firmly holds the work piece. Set up two routers. One with a chamfer bit with a top bearing and the other with a flat bottom "bowl bit" (I think that's what you call it) also with a top bearing to mortise out the hole. You would need a slightly larger bearing on the bowl bit so as to not remove the entire chamfer. Perhaps a disc sander on a shaft close to the diameter of the hole could be used to clean up the bottom of the mortised hole if necessary.

  12. #27
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    Since Iím guessing this is a valve for a pneumatic organ, would an automotive valve seat cutter get what you need?
    There seems to be ones available in the diameter you want and different chamfer angles. I am assuming the leather needs to seal against this edge.

    John

  13. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Sack View Post
    What about building a jig that firmly holds the work piece. Set up two routers. One with a chamfer bit with a top bearing and the other with a flat bottom "bowl bit" (I think that's what you call it) also with a top bearing to mortise out the hole. You would need a slightly larger bearing on the bowl bit so as to not remove the entire chamfer. Perhaps a disc sander on a shaft close to the diameter of the hole could be used to clean up the bottom of the mortised hole if necessary.
    Say you have two routers equipped with 7/8 id guide bushings and you purchase a router bit like the one shown. It has a 25/32 od. The bearing can be removed and it'.s mounting collar ground off (plus a little more if need be). Make a plywood template with an appropriate size hole to rout out your shallow hole using a 1/2 inch straight router bit and a guide bushing in one router. The chopped off chamfer bit in another router with the same diameter guide bushing can cut the desired chamfer by adjusting the bit up or down. Voila.
    https://www.toolstoday.com/media/cat.../s/msl2454.jpg
    Last edited by Dan Cameron; 01-23-2022 at 1:55 PM.

  14. #29
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    I'd try one if these. With a bit of practice, you'll be able to get consistent results.
    https://www.lowes.com/pd/Kobalt-NA-i...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

  15. #30
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    So the job is done, the modified spade bit worked like a champ. It worked much better to drill first with the spade bit, creating the chamfer, then follow with a forstner bit for the well using the center point as a guide. The other way around the spade bit chattered a lot. It was also important to saw off most of the spade bit shaft to reduce vibration. Quite happy with the outcome, and really appreciative of the suggestions here. On to the next problem!

    Cutting the chamfers:
    IMG_4235 (1).jpg

    wells being completed

    IMG_4236.jpg

    Finished decks, one that will have the pouches, the second will hold the valves that are actuated by the pouches.

    IMG_4238.jpeg
    Attached Images Attached Images

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