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Thread: Temporary Vertical Lumber Storage

  1. #1
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    Temporary Vertical Lumber Storage

    I have had to accept that I need to empty one of the storage areas sooner than I need to spray finish so some lumber is going in that space . I have made several versions of this sort of rack. This one should only be in use for about a year so it is cobbled from items found. A piece of unused siding that has laid out in the rain a few times will make the tilted deck.




    Yes it is cupped from exposure to the elements. I clamped it to the bench to determine the height of the supports once it gets squashed flat by all the lumber.





    The kickers at the rear keep the boards . . . well . . . kicked out from the wall at the bottom. The wall rail is made from the same water damaged plywood that was leaning between a shed and a wall for a couple of years. We're talking quality materials here boys.


    The wall rail in this version is a sandwich of however many layers it takes to bring it into plane with the vertically stored boards.





    The sandwich gets fastened to the wall via some Spax fasteners.





    Heads recessed so they don't snag things.





    The object for me in vertical lumber storage is to keep the material upright. This is helpful in that there is no real lateral stress or heavy weights to muscle through when sorting stock. I rip a length of that same plywood, drill an appropriate diameter hole at the right height and connect the dots with the bandsaw.









    I didn't need many dividers for this 7' or so run but just made up what the one ripped off strip would yield plus a nicer piece that was my test divider.
    <<< UPDATE >>> This proved to be wrong, needed more. Just a PSA ;-)





    Due to its weather tolerance I had relegated a small cache of white oak to a less than stellar storage area. I thought it would be best to haul this stuff in first.





    The dividers are used to divide species, thicknesses or types (QSWO, RSWO, etc.). Over the years this has worked out for me elsewhere. You can see the unused dividers just rest in the wall rail. Schlepping this material a couple of boards at a time is a drag. After breakfast I will drive the truck down there and load it up for a more efficient point A to point B relocation method. A side benefit is that I can pick out material as I go for something I am planning for the living room.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  2. #2
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    It is only temporary by location. It is in the space reserved for my spray booth . If things work out a panel-shorts bin that takes up about 8 square feet of floor space will get replaced by the new panel-shorts space behind the plywood corral. My permanent vertical storage will then move to the old panel-shorts bin location. Its like Christmas today. I moved that white oak and found a nest of sapele.



    I moved the sapele and found some walnut.



    I also found some over-ten-foot stock in the area I am trying to empty. I will move the sub-10 foot stock out of the horizontal racks and put it in the vertical space. This should allow me to put the long stuff in the horizontal racks and make enough room to empty the area that is in need or 'use reassignment'.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  3. #3
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    In the immortal words of Butch Cassidy "Well, that oughta do it . . . "




    At least the space I needed cleared out is nearly done. Just a few long sticks to put up on the wall racks and I'm good.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  4. #4
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    Looks like a pretty darn nice solution...I'd do that for permanent storage once I have a building! LOL So much easier to get to material than flat storage. The one thing I might do would be to put a "permanent" vertical stop at the open end of the rack to just insure everything cannot inadvertently fall in that direction should one or more dividers break. Could be wood or could be iron pipe fastened to the floor and ceiling. You have that shelving unit there presently.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 01-22-2022 at 4:32 PM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #5
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    Sneaky little bugger

    McLaren-Vert-Lumber-Rack (15).jpg

    In the permanent spot I will probably follow your suggestion and sink a section of pipe into one of the wall 2x6's at each end. Vertical lumber is one of those things that are relatively easy to keep under control in place but nearly impossible to regain control of if the mass starts to go the wrong place at the wrong time
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  6. #6
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    Yea, it's the Domino-effect I'd worry about...the game, not the tenon.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #7
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    It's a nice idea. I commend you if you truly can only have that as a temporary storage. Seems like in my shop temporary is a thought that becomes more or less permanent. Is that one of the Home Depot adjustable height table/carts?

  8. #8
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    Looks great Glenn - nice stash of material!!

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