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Thread: Conference Table

  1. #31
    Hi Malcom,


    That's a lot. I wasn't asking for advice and advice doesn't usually go well when you start off by saying "I haven't read everything". That said, your comments are fair, given your generalization of the situation.


    This table is for my companies office. If there are any issues, I'll be able to fix them, and no one will be upset—That's why it's also fine that it's going slowly.


    I believe this particular issue is straightforward enough with a clear solution. The steel is a known quantity, but the calculations on the load would be complicated because it's unclear how much load I need to transfer from the glue/domino joints to the under-frame. Additionally, I'm not counting just on the rigidity of the steel but the transfer of load to the other adjacent planks on the table through short stretch of steel. Finally, a pre-fabricated base supports most of the table fully, so the primary issue is about 18" on each end (as this was originally intended to be an 8' table). I also am accounting for additional weight, such as a person sitting on the edge or other forces, such as someone falling or dropping something onto the edge. I've used a structural engineer when I thought it necessary and this is not that case.


    Derek

  2. #32
    I wasn't asking for advice.

    Heh. When you post here you are going to get it anyway. The good thing is it is almost always worth every penny.

    You are building an unorthodox design calling for an unusual substructure. When you post that you are learning to weld on this project you are bound to get some unsolicited advice from metalworkers and engineers of which there are more than a few here. With any luck some of it will be useful, the rest you can ignore.

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by derek labian View Post
    Hi Malcom,


    ..., given your generalization of the situation.
    Hi Derec,
    I read all of your posts, but I can promise there will be no such future generalizations. Best of luck.

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Jenness View Post
    I wasn't asking for advice.


    Heh. When you post here you are going to get it anyway. The good thing is it is almost always worth every penny.


    You are building an unorthodox design calling for an unusual substructure. When you post that you are learning to weld on this project you are bound to get some unsolicited advice from metalworkers and engineers of which there are more than a few here. With any luck some of it will be useful, the rest you can ignore.
    Agreed.


    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm McLeod View Post
    Hi Derec,
    I read all of your posts, but I can promise there will be no such future generalizations. Best of luck.
    It's Derek. Your words not mine:

    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm McLeod
    Caveat: I haven't read this all; just a quick skim thru ....
    My point was, you assumed a lot in giving me very strong and specific advice, which I said was "fair advice". I have no interest in bickering with you.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    2,222
    Once you get it glued up start measuring the length and chart it so you will know where in the slots to put the screws.

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bender View Post
    Once you get it glued up start measuring the length and chart it so you will know where in the slots to put the screws.

    It's all done now. I ended up taking the advice Andrew made. For some reason, as he indicated, angle iron is much cheaper. The screws just ride the angle iron to allow for expansion and use the adjacent plans to support each other. to strengthen the wings against impact load, I sandwiched bar steel between the angle iron to reduce downward deflection. The angle iron prevents lateral deflection/twisting of the bar steel. I first made brackets out of angle iron, but it wasn't "clean" looking; it was also a lot of work to make the slots. Riding one side of the angle iron worked much better. To save time I re-used the existing box steel frame which worked fine, but isn't as "aesthetically" pleasing.


    Quote Originally Posted by andrew whicker View Post
    One way to do it is to use two pieces of angle iron where the back of the L is kept spaced out from the other by a certain distance, creating an endless slot..

    In the end, the result is pretty good. I got much better at welding over the process too. I'd start with load calculations instead of winging it if I had to do it again. Even though it was hard to calculate the exact load, as I mentioned above, it was clear that 1/16" box steel would never be sufficient; load calculations would have quickly shown that. As it was, I needed just to make what I already had work, so it is not exactly an ideal or efficient design. I think the best value of time and money would have been channel steel which has suitable properties, and I can quickly get as thick as I need. Also, I could have added angle iron onto one side for attaching the top.


    I purchased the base/frame pre-made; however, it wasn't stable enough to support the weight of the top. The frame was designed to use the top to stabilize the base. Because it's designed for a traditional top with the long grain running parallel to the base, the screw holes are oriented as such. I further welded the frame solid where it had been bolted and added angle iron to it as well so the top could expand and still stay on the base.


    I think it came out pretty good; it still needs some cleanup and the sealer/topcoats. I would have liked the planks to be a bit more similar, but I did my best to re-arranging the planks to find the best configuration.

    IMG_9277.jpeg

    Screen Shot 2022-02-22 at 9.08.42 AM.jpg
    Last edited by derek labian; 02-22-2022 at 10:48 AM.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Apr 2021
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    201
    Yep, I would inlay two 5 ft lengths of c channel on the underside with the bolt pattern Mark outlines to account for wood movement. Similar to the strategy used to keep thick live edge table tops from cupping.

    Something like this: (link is just an example, I have no idea who this vendor is)

    https://www.raymondsworkshop.com/products/c-channel

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Keegan Shields View Post
    Yep, I would inlay two 5 ft lengths of c channel on the underside with the bolt pattern Mark outlines to account for wood movement. Similar to the strategy used to keep thick live edge table tops from cupping.

    Something like this: (link is just an example, I have no idea who this vendor is)

    https://www.raymondsworkshop.com/products/c-channel
    Agreed. The slots I found were the hardest part. This would be a much cleaner solution.

  9. #39
    Final update. Table finished and installed.

    Screen Shot 2022-02-26 at 8.07.23 AM.jpg Screen Shot 2022-02-26 at 8.11.30 AM.jpg

    (Wish I could close this thread now??)
    Last edited by derek labian; 02-26-2022 at 9:16 AM.

  10. #40
    That came out well. Two questions: What led you to designing the table with the grain direction shown? Would you do it that way again?

  11. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Jenness View Post
    That came out well. Two questions: What led you to designing the table with the grain direction shown? Would you do it that way again?
    First time I worked on a table like that I wondered the same thing, it’s obvious convenience. I was astounded at what my employer was
    charging and surprised at the “boat” shape,too. The easiest way gets to be the standard for style.

  12. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Jenness View Post
    That came out well. Two questions: What led you to designing the table with the grain direction shown? Would you do it that way again?
    Thank you.

    1. I had not planed for that, but I purchased wood for an 8' table. The customer (the company I work for) decided it needed to be 10'. I didn't want to sit on 6/4 plain sawn wood for this as I normally use rift sawn.

    2. I like the effect so I would do it again with channel steel though. It was far more work than a traditional table, so something to consider and build into any estimates/quotes.

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