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Thread: Anyone Using Titebond Original for Shop Sawn Veneer?

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Henderson View Post
    I've use plain old white glue (Elmer's white glue) for a lot of veneer (commercial veneer) with no problems over many years. I've also used Titebond original with no problems. The advantage/disadvantage of white glue is that if it comes through the veneer, you can wash it off with water and not have a glue mark under your finish.

    The disadvantage is that if the piece got wet - really wet - the veneer could come unglued. But you'd almost have to have the piece caught in a flood to have that happen. I suppose that since Titebond original is not waterproof, you could have the same problem.

    Mike
    Thanks Mike. Shop sawn veneer and sliced veneer are different animals. Shop sawn veneer behaves more like real wood so some of the glues that work fine with sliced veneer don't with shop sawn stuff. I can't find any strength data for Elmer's glue so it's not on my radar.

    John

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul F Franklin View Post
    What about Unibond One? I have no experience with it, so am asking out of curiosity.
    Maybe. It's probably similar to Titebond Original or Extend but I haven't seen any data so that's just a guess. Thanks.

    John

  3. #18
    Glad to see Mike is back. White glue used to be well known for moving ,shrinking the veneer into little islands (higher ground in the middle).
    Or just moving just a bit away from where you wanted it. There were lots of warnings in print about using it , and I’ve seen it ,in employments be a problem. But I would not be surprised if he has a procedure that obviates that. Yellow glue was big news because of its stability and non gummyness. I saw some shops start using less hot
    hide glue and more yellow glue.
    Last edited by Mel Fulks; 01-15-2022 at 9:16 PM.

  4. #19
    [QUOTE=John TenEyck;3168812]I'm sure it works well, Joe, but the price is ridiculous.


    We used to order it much cheaper than the Weldwood stuff. Canít remember the company now. Look up Plastic Resin Glue. Not brand
    name.

  5. #20

  6. #21
    I just finished some bent lam work with Unibond One and had a reasonably positive experience. The open time is pretty good and I got next to nothing springback-wise. Glueline dries hard enough to cut yourself on (DAMHKT), and it's tintable.

    It's still a PVA, so by the time I got glue on my last bent lam ply, the first one had a bit of cupping from being wet on one side, but after clamping and drying, there were no issues. These were shop-sawn 1/8" plies, so probably thicker than your shop sawn veneer, but the concept translates since it wasn't thin sliced commercial stuff.

    If you're looking for a PVA glue to do this type of work, I'd recommend this over titebond any day (and I use titebond for most everything else I do - I like it).

  7. #22
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    I do bent laminations pretty routinely, with titebond II normally. Looking a chair back yesterday that was a bent lamination, about five years old now and still looks exactly like when I made it.

    I did veneer work with better bond and unibond and much prefer titebond original or II. I’ll give titebond extend a try when my container of II runs out. I load up a Pizzi tank and use their pressurized roller for laying the glue.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  8. #23
    Brian; Your bent laminations actually hold their shape with a PVA? Spring back tolerable?

    Weldwood Plastic Resin Glue: had no Idea it was dropped. Evidently I've got the last of it in my shop.
    Alternative: Veneer supplies sells Ultra-CAT powdered Urea Resin, which I've used with equally good results for burl veneers and thicker, bent lams for a super-solid, rigid glue line. Can also be speed-cured with heat blankets.
    FWIW
    jeff

  9. #24
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    Chair backs on spindle back chairs aren’t ultra critical, so I just plan a little more curve than ultimately desired.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  10. #25
    [QUOTE=Mel Fulks;3168827]
    Quote Originally Posted by John TenEyck View Post
    I'm sure it works well, Joe, but the price is ridiculous.


    We used to order it much cheaper than the Weldwood stuff. Canít remember the company now. Look up Plastic Resin Glue. Not brand
    name.
    well, I was wrong on this one. Canít find much . Are the Feds trying to drive it out of use ?

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Engel View Post

    That's my go-to, but the OP wanted extended shelf life beyond 12 months
    I'm with those who recommended an epoxy -- you can store for a few years if stored properly, you won't get crazy warping from moisture, rigid cure, it's easy to get 40 minutes+ of open time, and bleed-through is never a problem when your epoxy cures water-clear.

  12. #27
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    Thanks very much Jeff. I had forgotten about Ultra CAT. Looks for all the world like a perfect replacement for PRG.

    John

  13. #28
    Jeff, when we were out of plastic-resin stuff we added a little water to yellow glue. The lams would stay on overnight in a warm room.
    The glue-up would ,of course ,spring back ,but as dried , off form , they would curl up some. The water actually seemed to help that.
    I think the water was a big part of what made the plastic resin glue work.

  14. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by John TenEyck View Post
    Thanks very much Jeff. I had forgotten about Ultra CAT. Looks for all the world like a perfect replacement for PRG.

    John
    Be aware that the stated shelf life is one year unopened and eight months after opening. As I recall the same was true for the Weldwood product, although your experience with it indicates that it really was usable for longer. Perhaps that is true for Ultracat. In any case, water is the catalyst so keeping humidity out is the key.

  15. #30
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    found a second listing on amazon....8oz $17.36...ships from Amazon...might be worth a try

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