Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Slider Ripping

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Waterford, PA
    Posts
    1,103

    Slider Ripping

    Being a newer user of the Sliding Table Saw format, I've run into a cut that I'm wondering about. I have a small format slider, and would like to rip some stock longer than my wagon. I realize I could rip this using the fence to the right of the blade like a traditional table saw. Somewhere, I though, I read something about a method of ripping items longer than the wagon, but can't seem to locate it now. Does anyone know what I saw or how to do this?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    1,096
    Hey Lisa, you would need to make a jig/sled with a runner that fits tightly in the channel of your sliding table. You affix your piece to the table, make the cut to your table's extents, and then push your sled through the cut via the runner. I know ive seen a youtube video of this with a guy using a small hammer 5 combo machine and he was straightlining 12'+ lengths on his saw. Personally, i would rip your material using the rip fence if you have a jointer and can make a straight reference edge. That is just me, the pragmatist that loathes making jigs.

  3. #3
    I believe (Dr.?) Mr. Cohen demonstrated a method on SMC using 2 sliding squares (no jig/sled). I also believe he posted photos to go with it.

    Hard to describe, but he cut as far as wagon stroke allowed, then registered the outside of the board to the wagon at 2 (marked) places - 1 with each square, moved the board forward (relative to the wagon), re-registered it with the squares (at the marked locations on the board), and continued the cut. ...Best as can recall?

    Not sure what to give you for search terms to this old thread.
    Last edited by Malcolm McLeod; 01-11-2022 at 11:27 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Bucks County, PA
    Posts
    890
    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm McLeod View Post
    I believe (Dr.?) Mr. Cohen demonstrated a method on SMC using 2 sliding squares (no jig/sled). I also believe he posted photos to go with it.

    Hard to describe, but he cut as far as wagon stroke allowed, then registered the outside of the board to the wagon at 2 (marked) places - 1 with each square, moved the board forward (relative to the wagon), re-registered it with the squares (at the marked locations on the board), and continued the cut. ...Best as can recall?

    Not sure what to give you for search terms to this old thread.
    Derek's method is here: https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....art-of-a-build
    And there was trouble, taking place...

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Wurster View Post
    Thanks. I had some of the details wrong (2 squares vs 1?), or maybe I'm cross-confused with another thread?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Waterford, PA
    Posts
    1,103
    Thank you all. I've located both Derek's discussion of his method and a YouTube video of the sliding jig.

  7. #7
    I've never personally used them but we sell these steel T-profile rails for folks to DIY their own overtravel sleds. 3000mm long: https://www.felder-group.com/en-us/s...pment-sp123878

    Erik
    Ex-SCM and Felder rep

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    2,000
    Just a comment, if you do rip against the fence in traditional fashion it means taking off your miter. Else you cant feed any longer than if using the sled (front of the board just runs into the miter).

    I have done a few where I just rip as far as it will go, then flip the board end to end and rip from the other end to finish it somewhere mid point. If you are careful on what you reference against it can be a decent result. Pretty straightforward in particular if you are ripping sheet good where you have a decent edge as reference.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    10,817
    Quote Originally Posted by Erik Loza View Post
    I've never personally used them but we sell these steel T-profile rails for folks to DIY their own overtravel sleds. 3000mm long: https://www.felder-group.com/en-us/s...pment-sp123878

    Erik
    Hi Erik, those are a composite material, not steel…..Regards, Rod.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •