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Thread: New storage box for chisels

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    South West Ontario
    Posts
    1,364
    The first box, fully fitted, comes over as more refined. The hinged lid is the issue when in use. When you get to 7 chisels the lid would become very awkward, hence the change in design.

    The circular magnets add a very modern look to the box, the floating chisel ends less refined. It is a lovely box make no mistake and that is part of the problem! If it was a pure utility simple boxwood construction with magnets it would be ‘acceptably’ modern .

    Like you Derek I have a hard time building utility, imagining I’m going to live long enough to enjoy the luxury or at least someone else will! Unlike you, my luxury is usually limited to veneer!

    It is true a washer below the magnet acts as a keeper and increases the holding power and life of the magnet. My appearance suggestion is to mix epoxy with ‘bronze’ powder, it’s really copper powder. The result is dull gold or aged bronze, rather refined. If enough is added to each magnet to flow over and just fill the void around each magnet you get the more classic look of gorgeous wood and bronze. Two or more layers of blue tape with the right size hole would help restrain the epoxy.

    I use this a lot, repairing ‘oops’ on my bench. Filling worm holes on spalted wormy maple, gives subtle flecks of gold. I use the West epoxy system which is truly transparent. Just a thought.
    Last edited by William Fretwell; 01-12-2022 at 9:29 AM.
    ​You can do a lot with very little! You can do a little more with a lot!

  2. #17
    Join Date
    May 2021
    Location
    Spartanburg South Carolina
    Posts
    297
    Derek, I have been going through ways to hide the ploughed groove for the panels. Watched a video (Rob Cosman) on four ways to hide. Cutting the last pin at 45 deg was not one of them. Thank You!

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    8,388
    Scott, Rob Cosman was asked to demonstrate a mitred through dovetail. He declined, saying that he had never made one. I understand and partly accept this. It is not a joint to teach beginners.

    My ranking for dovetails is, hardest to easiest: mitred through dovetails (as the joinery is 3D); through dovetails (as the joinery is 2D); and half-blind (as the joinery is 1D). Secret mitred dovetails are a notch up from half blind as it is the mitre that is relevant. The dovetails are never seen.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    21,696
    Blog Entries
    1
    Beautiful execution of what for many could have just been a utility object. I always enjoy your work and the way you elevate things to a higher level. Thanks for sharing the upgrade.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  5. #20
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    N Illinois
    Posts
    4,650
    Excellent work!!! Thank you.
    Jerry

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Central New Jersey
    Posts
    43
    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post
    Jim

    That is basically how I did it. Drilled a smidgeon with a forstner, just to set the perimeter, Then a little out of the centre (shy of depth). Finally excavated with gouges: out channel to shape, and in channel to finish.

    The hollow was created in the same way as Alan Peters demos here Ö just smaller

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Thanks Derek, I could use some carving chisels. Just ordered a few; unfortunately they are on backorder. Once I give it a try I will let you know.
    Jim
    Come join us at the Central Jersey Woodworkers Association www.cjwa.org

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post
    Scott, Rob Cosman was asked to demonstrate a mitred through dovetail. He declined, saying that he had never made one. I understand and partly accept this. It is not a joint to teach beginners.

    My ranking for dovetails is, hardest to easiest: mitred through dovetails (as the joinery is 3D); through dovetails (as the joinery is 2D); and half-blind (as the joinery is 1D). Secret mitred dovetails are a notch up from half blind as it is the mitre that is relevant. The dovetails are never seen.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    One thing Iíve seen on your site that I would love to learn is your curved dovetails. They looked fantastic. Iíve never seen them anywhere else

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