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Thread: Joining two end to end slabs

  1. #16
    One more…if you have a dining room table with “leaves” and you don’t want your guests to see those joints, just duct-tape across em’…
    or buy a nice colorful tarp. Or….if you can afford it , a new 4 by 8 piece of plywood. Much stronger than “leaves” .

  2. #17
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    The other method is to admit it is two pieces and use a contrasting wood,tile, or stone at the splice.
    Bill D.
    This is along the lines of what I was thinking...make the join a "feature".
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #18
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    I think it would look fine if you celebrate the joint and don't try to hide it, as mentioned earlier. I'd loose tenon the pieces back together and then route a dado through the joint, however wide looks appealing, on both the top and sides, and inlay a contrasting wood.

    John

  4. #19
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    Finger joint might look decent

  5. #20
    “No Way to Hide It” “let’s make that nose even BIGGER!!…..and REDDER !” ( said by a failed plastic surgeon )

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    “No Way to Hide It” “let’s make that nose even BIGGER!!…..and REDDER !” ( said by a failed plastic surgeon )
    Hey I like Rudolph!
    Wonder if now we know why the invented racing stripes for cars.
    Bill D

  7. #22
    Maybe two smaller tables...send the "friend" back with a truck to get the next slab from the log, and hide the saw this time.

  8. #23
    Join Date
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    If you can't make it perfect, make it obvious...
    Funny, I don't remember being absent minded...

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Westfall View Post
    If you can't make it perfect, make it obvious...

    Yeah, I think a contrasting strip between the 2 would look great. Like it was planned so they could be transported. Maybe a narrow gap between both joints, for breadcrumbs to fall thru.

    Was also thinking the divider could be deliberately taller than the slab surface as an accent, and not blended in at the edges. Make it a feature, not a fix.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Orrville, Ohio
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    I had this very thing happen to me. A friend purchased some beautiful 10' lengths of quilted maple for a dining room table and had them sawn in half to transport. Our initial plan was to make 2 tables that could be placed together at the joint, but then I thought - why not try to join them back together? Worst case I'd have to cut them back apart and try something else. I cleaned up the joint with a router and used a spline to make the joint. The result was surprisingly good. You can see the joint if you are looking for it, but it certainly does not draw attention to itself.

    IMG_0668.jpg

    IMG_0667.jpg

    53142.JPEG

    53143.JPEG

  11. #26
    That is an option to consider. Thanks.

  12. #27
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    How will the table be used? If normal use there will always be stuff covering most of it and your beautiful workmanship will be wasted anyway.

  13. #28
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    Inif said...
    - “It’s not that I’m so smart, it’s just that I stay with problems longer.” – Albert Einstein
    - Welcome to Florida. Where the old folks visit their parents

  14. #29
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    When I was in design school, it was recognized that there are a number of joints that will never be indistinguishable. Rather trying to hide them (which was futile), we would always design in some sort of "reveal" that looked good but said "meant to do that". The live edge aspect complicates things, but I might consider breadboards at both ends with a matching one centrally located.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Dilyard View Post
    I had this very thing happen to me. A friend purchased some beautiful 10' lengths of quilted maple for a dining room table and had them sawn in half to transport. Our initial plan was to make 2 tables that could be placed together at the joint, but then I thought - why not try to join them back together? Worst case I'd have to cut them back apart and try something else. I cleaned up the joint with a router and used a spline to make the joint. The result was surprisingly good. You can see the joint if you are looking for it, but it certainly does not draw attention to itself.

    IMG_0668.jpg

    IMG_0667.jpg

    53142.JPEG

    53143.JPEG
    Very nice!..................
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

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