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Thread: Sander spindle well and truly stuck

  1. #1
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    Sep 2013
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    Sander spindle well and truly stuck

    Seeking advice on getting a stuck sander spindle out. It is well and truly stuck.

    My son, after 30 years of disinterest in the shop, has become captivated by building electric guitars. I'm delighted to have him in the shop, though am learning that I've grown even more curmudgeonly about sharing my space. Anyway, I didn't show him, and he didn't ask, about changing sanding spindles in my State T5 spindle sander.

    It seems he tightened the drawbar in the spindle with a wrench, to the point where the collar that enables the releasing mechanism at the bottom sheared off when he tried to remove the spindle. So it now has a severely stuck morse taper.

    We have tried every form of tapping, twisting, and pulling I can imagine. I got a set of wedges intended for removing Jacobs chucks from drill presses and couldn't budge it. Hit the end of the wedge hard enough to break it at the end. None of my usual tricks for un-sticking a morse taper are helping me here. Haven't figured out how to best apply heat/cold to the parts I can reach; I'm nervous about applying a torch to the spindle. Your thoughts are welcome.

    Here's the stuck spindle in situ:

    IMG_4089.jpg

    This is what the end of the spindle is supposed to look like, with a collar pinned on ant the bottom that enables an auto-eject operation

    IMG_4090.jpeg

    The drawbar from the stuck spindle. The roll pin that held the collar has been sheared off.

    IMG_4091.jpg

  2. #2
    Can you put the quill with spindle in the freezer, then heat the outside of the quill?

  3. #3
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    I don't know how hard it is to disassemble this thing, I guess I can start trying to take it apart.

  4. #4
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    Can you find a machine shop in your area that uses liquid nitrogen for shrinking interference fit item? Seems like it would be possible to spoon the liquid into the spindle hole and super cool the taper, which might well permit it to release.

  5. #5
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    Do you have reasonably unimpeded access to the bottom of the spindle? If I am seeing things clearly the nut on the bottom draws the spindle into the taper. If you have clear access put the nut on until the end is just shy of flush and strike with a preferably brass hammer. (Less chance of damaging the nut). The beauty of any locking taper is if they move they come loose. That looks like a small taper maybe a #1. Correct me if I am wrong. Maybe show some photo's if feasible of the bottom end and the obstacles there. Maybe someone else here has experienced this specific issue. Good luck.

  6. #6
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    I think you have to remove the spindle and tap it out with a punch from the bottom.
    Bill D

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Demuth View Post
    Can you find a machine shop in your area that uses liquid nitrogen for shrinking interference fit item? Seems like it would be possible to spoon the liquid into the spindle hole and super cool the taper, which might well permit it to release.
    Or take a piece of PVC pipe, glue an end cap on one end, bore a hole in the endcap the size of the flange or spindle shaft, slide it over the spindle, and fill the pvc pipe with crushed dry ice. Freeze the shaft and hopefully a few sharp pecks on the bottom with some vertical lift and it pops out.

  8. #8
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    We had a Jet spindle sander at work that froze like that. In a business it was easier to buy a new sander and get back to work than invest more hours trying to remove it. We gave the sander to a part time guy and he ended up selling it for scrap. The spindle would not come out!

  9. #9
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    My little mill/drill uses mt3 spindle drive. I have to use a 3lb sledge and some force to knock it loose. I let it drop 6-10 inches with gravity which is often not enough force.This is with a almost perfect down ward lineup. No up side down in a cramped cabinet.
    Bill D

  10. #10
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    Not sure I completely understand the issue but a slide hammer comes to mind.
    Regards,

    Kris

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kris Cook View Post
    Not sure I completely understand the issue but a slide hammer comes to mind.
    I like that! I have to see what I can find that has some mass and a hole in the middle.

    I'm not looking forward to trying to disassemble this thing. Clearly if the spindle is hollow then knocking it out from the back side is a good idea. It would also make it easier to do the various temperature manipulations.

  12. #12
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    Any weight lifters around. A single unmatched weight plate can be had for cheap. Or brake rotors.
    Bill D

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by roger wiegand View Post
    I like that! I have to see what I can find that has some mass and a hole in the middle. ...
    I also am not sure I completely understand the situation, but if you think a slide hammer might work (I assume you mean by applying upwards force against a nut threaded on the top of the shaft) then it might be easier to devise a puller instead. Perhaps a thick block of wood (or stack of boards) with a through hole, tighten the nut to press against a large, strong washer to create a steady pulling force? Or press against a piece of pipe slipped over the shaft, if there's anything sturdy enough at the bottom to press against?

    Also, where I couldn't use heat on the outside part I have used the dry ice method on the inside part, when I could find it at the grocery store.

    A large tapered shaft (maybe 2" diameter) on my old skid steer was so stuck that I couldn't get it to budge even with repeated blows with all the muscle I could put into a large sledge hammer. I eventually got it loose by rigging a puller. There were no threads to tighten a nut against but I used a hydraulic chain puller with my 10 ton PortaPower, smacking the other end with the sledge while pulling. I had imagined it was stuck from corrosion or something but when I got it off the mating surfaces were smooth and clean.

  14. #14
    Heat. I've used a butane torch to loosen many stuck, friction fit parts. Let us know what happens.

  15. #15
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    Got it! The slide hammer idea worked. Nearly cracked myself in the forehead when it came out (Duh!) but missed, and now all is well. Note to self, wear hard hat and face shield when propelling semi-pointy metal object towards my face.

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