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Thread: Router Bit coming loose when attached to router table

  1. #16
    Collets are an overlooked wear item that should be cleaned frequently and replaced when worn.

    Bits can be out of tolerance too. I once had an Amana bit show up so bad that I could see something was off right out of the package. The shank measured something like .025" under 1/2". The collet would never have held it securely.

    If you really have to reef on your collet take a close look at it. Manufacturers usually provide wenches long enough to tighten their collets properly with normal torque.

  2. #17
    Bits that have an up cut angle put some pressure on the bit pulling it out of the collet. Real bummer when a dovetail bit walks down 1/8” while making a pass in the dovetail jig. Light passes reduce the pulling load. In the case of the dovetail jig, plowing out the bulk of the waste with a 1/4” straight bit helps a great deal.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luis Reyes View Post
    I guess I'll be buying more 1/2 in shanks as those have worked well and I really like them so far.
    That's a good plan. Never use a 1/4" shank where you could use a 1/2". They're just so much more stout.

  4. #19
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    All of the above, plus, be sure to measure the real shaft size of those cheap bits from amazon. We are finding that many of the "1/4" bits are really 6mm bits, especially the ones from China. Those bits have a shank size of .236" and will be loose in the collet, no matter how tight you make it.
    Grant
    Ottawa ON

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Myk Rian View Post
    Don't drop the bit shank all the way into the collet. Lift it off the bottom.
    Tightening a collet will push the bit into it, preventing the collet from tightening.
    +1 on not bottoming the bit. I make it a habit to lift the bit just a little before tightening.

    I’ve read that an easy way to prevent bottoming is to find a nice thick but squishy o-ring and just leave in there.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Coers View Post
    Definitely change the collet. They wear a bit like an hour glass on the inside bore. Replacements are not expensive.
    There is another thread active here about router collets. I haven't needed a replacement yet but when I do I'll probably get one from Elaire Corp. I have 2 Porter Cable routers, one Freud FT2000E and one Grizzly trim router that is 1/4" only. None of them have an issue with the bit coming loose and I don't use much force to tighten them. All but the Freud use two wrenches and it's pretty easy to get a fair bit of torque using two wrenches. Interesting comment about 6 mm vs. 1/4" upthread, that would certainly be something to check.

  7. #22
    Leaving a space between bit and collet doesn’t get much press. I worked with a guy who did mostly laminate work , one time he had a
    problem with a bit moving . I told him to leave about a slight 1/8th . He replied “I ain’t never heard that before”. He tried it and it worked.
    More would know about it if there were more slipping bits , then the fix would get ‘famous’. He had worked for many years and never had
    a slip until that day.

  8. #23
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    Or, if you have a Space Ball from building cabinet doors, drop one down the collet before putting bit in. Cut in half if you're worried about it being too thick.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Feeley View Post
    +1 on not bottoming the bit. I make it a habit to lift the bit just a little before tightening.

    I’ve read that an easy way to prevent bottoming is to find a nice thick but squishy o-ring and just leave in there.
    A 1/4" space ball dropped into the collet will prevent the bits from bottoming out.
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USN(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  10. #25
    Your problem is the 1/4" collet. Nothing bigger than an 1/4" round over should even be made with a 1/4" shank. They just don't have enough of a mechanical advantage or gripping surface to resist slippage.

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