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Thread: Plywood Corral

  1. #1
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    Plywood Corral

    I have been percolating on something like this ever since I saw one in an American Woodworker mag back in 2004. I've never had space for one. When I started thinking about my next shop I planned for this from day one. The stowed position will be in front of the double doors. This will allow access to the shorts rack I plan to build on the wall to the left in the pic. The double doors are only used for material coming in and large pieces going out. The swivel action on the rack makes changing position a non-issue. The angles in between the two extremes allow me to put material in and out more easily.









    A couple shots of the hinge parts.









    The design includes a lifting ring on each side that let me pull and push the rig from the torsion box bottom. There is a piece of 3/8" all thread through a solid member at the front of the base assembly.





    And that is pretty much it. I will enjoy having somewhere for my sheet goods to go other than leaning against the walls where I have to move them around or out in the sheds where I am not even sure of what I have.


    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  2. #2
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    That's a really kewel solution, Glenn!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
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    That's really neat! I have something like that for different sized off cuts (standing upright) with partitions in it. Doesn't swivel though, but is on wheels. I've had it for years and very handy. I have some plywood storage on it on about 25% of the width. Anyway, nice thinking outside the box!! Randy
    Randy Cox
    Lt Colonel, USAF (ret.)

  4. #4
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    Really like that, Glenn. I went vertical, as I didn't have the space, but can store far less plywood in my solution.
    - Its not that Im so smart, its just that I stay with problems longer. Albert Einstein
    - Welcome to Florida. Where the old folks visit their parents

  5. #5
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    Thanks all. The same idea could work vertically if that was a better foot print for you. The real win for me on the swinging feature is that I don't have to have a dedicated open area to remove material. I can swing the fixture to an angle that will work at the time. This may seem like a minor issue but it was the one that tormented me the most in the past . This means that I was focused on fixing a problem that may not even exist for someone else .
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  6. #6
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    The real win for me on the swinging feature is that I don't have to have a dedicated open area to remove material. I can swing the fixture to an angle that will work at the time. This may seem like a minor issue but it was the one that tormented me the most in the past . This means that I was focused on fixing a problem that may not even exist for someone else
    I made a similar "swing out" storage for sheet goods back in 2007. Mine swung out from the wall and blocked 1/2 of my garage door - the way yours blocks the double doors. The thing that killed mine is the same thing yours does well. I had to move a ton of stuff out of the way before I could swing mine out away from the wall. I ended up just putting wheels all aoround on mine so I could just roll it where needed - unload it - then roll it back against the wall.

    I like the hinge though.

    Who knows, once our new house gets built and I move into the new shop, I might convert my roll around back into a swing out.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  7. #7
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    I realized if I took the time to build out the shorts rack behind the plywood corral I would never get anything except shop fixtures done for the foreseeable future. I threw down a scrap of ply and stuck another one against the wall for protection and gathered a lot of stuff from outer-wherever.

    McLaren Plywood Rack (40).jpg

    I also gathered most of the other items that will go in this thing from hither and yon.

    McLaren Plywood Rack (41).jpg

    I can fit maybe 4 more 3/4" sheets in and have it still be usable. The swinging motion with that weight seems little different than before so I am happy about that.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  8. #8
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    Bugzapper???

    Oh, and I don't think it was mentioned yet. I love the sign over the door. You're a lucky man.
    - Its not that Im so smart, its just that I stay with problems longer. Albert Einstein
    - Welcome to Florida. Where the old folks visit their parents

  9. #9
    That's a good solution, Glenn.

    I have a fixed vertical rack with dividers for inventory and offcuts, but this is a flexible option that I use for full sheets on a job in progress and organizing cut parts for further processing. I can fill it up and still move it around single handed. I can tip sheets against one side or the other for access to the middle of the stack, slide panels out the end onto the crazy horse, or stack long parts with the stanchions turned sideways.https://shopcartsusa.com/Product-LateralPartsCart.html

  10. #10
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    Now that I see how you have that setup with the shorts/cutoffs area, I'm seriously thinking about incorporating something that duplicates it when I get a new shop building up. That's really efficient and well within the typical amount of stuff I might keep around.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lightstone View Post
    Bugzapper???
    I know. Funny, right? With all the livestock around I wasn't really surprised to get flies. I was surprised at how many of them prefer the shop to the great outdoors . Only a problem after I have the doors open for a period of time. The light needs a new home. I have it on a timer for a couple of hours a couple times a day. If any of the little buggers are inside I find a nice pile of corpses under the light that get swept or vacuumed up throughout the day with the rest of the spoil
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  12. #12
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    I live in horse country, I've given serious thought about a bug zapper. Makes total sense to me. I ended up with some of those velcro screens, so my dog can come and go... Although, this year may see a zapper too.
    ~mike

    life in a mud hut

  13. #13
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    Maybe I missed it somewhere above... but what is the benefit of the wall mounted hinge mechanism as opposed to just having four swiveling casters, so it could be pulled out and/or pivoted?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monte Milanuk View Post
    Maybe I missed it somewhere above... but what is the benefit of the wall mounted hinge mechanism as opposed to just having four swiveling casters, so it could be pulled out and/or pivoted?
    More stable as it's supported by the wall on the pivot end. Substantially more stable for something of that length, but relatively narrow in width.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #15
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    I like it -- especially because it doesn't permanently block a chunk of wall space.

    My fixed, vertical, storage rack has a convenient roller that I read about years ago. It's a simple 3/4-inch galvanized pipe inside a slightly larger PVC pipe set flush with the bottom of the rack. The PVC rolls around the metal pipe to reduce friction against the bottom of the rack, making removal of sheets easier.

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