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Thread: Custom heavy duty mobile base

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2021
    Location
    Southwest WI
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    245

    Custom heavy duty mobile base

    I recently ordered a oliver 25 inch planer and in my current shop I need it to be mobile. I can't find a mobile base rated for the weight of the machine (apox 1800#). I have a shop fox base that I believe is rated for 1500# under my shaper (powermatic ts29 1100#) that is very difficult to move. Is there any option out there for a heavier base? Am I better off to have a local welder make me one? If I have one made is there a certain kind of caster that would be best? I seem to prefer the urethane coated cast iron casters on my other bases l.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Elmodel, Ga.
    Posts
    729
    May be a bit cheaper to put it on some sort of pallet. Then go to HF or some other cheap store and buy a pallet jack. Having someone weld one culd cost you about as much.
    My Dad always told me "Can't Never Could".

    SWE

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2021
    Location
    Southwest WI
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    245
    That would work but it would be nice to not have to store a pallet jack

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    533
    This might give you some ideas for haveing one built. I plan to do something simular for a slider, when I get one. He used 3.5" X 3.5" X 1/4" angle. Simple, but functional.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iLRQhsTZKoA&t=1s
    Last edited by Michael Drew; 12-31-2021 at 8:14 PM. Reason: Forgot the link...

  5. #5
    I have a shop made “mobile base” under my 20” SCM planer that weighs ~1600# and I routinely move it around within a certain area of my shop which is fairly rough and uneven concrete slab. It’s not the easiest to get moving but I manage it and the difficulty comes from the rough condition of the slab and not so much the weight or casters. I would have no problems moving it around easily on a smooth finished slab.

    The previous owner made it from 2x6s crisscrossed on the flat and 5” diameter steel casters. The only thing I would change is to have all 4 casters swivel and lock instead of the current arrangement of 2 swiveling wheels and 2 fixed wheels with no locks. Of course, this raises the height of the machine 6-10” but for me that’s actually a plus with a planer that is typically lower than I’d want it to be if sitting on the floor or a low profile mobile base. This wouldn’t necessarily work for some other machine with higher CoG but works great for a big planer.

    If I were buying new wheels and casters from scratch I would look at phenolic wheels rated for 800+ lbs each and high quality swiveling and locking casters to suit from a place like Caster City. If you call them on the phone about what you need, they will likely offer you a nicely discounted sale compared to their website as well as tell you your best options based on the specifics of your situation (floor, weight, etc.)
    Still waters run deep.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Orwell, NY
    Posts
    1,094
    Surplus Center is also a good source of casters at low prices, and they have a pretty vast selection on their website.

  7. #7
    +1 on using a pallet jack. I have a Crescent P24 planer (4,000#) and mounted it on a pair of 6x6 running front to back. I don't need to move it often but the jack makes it relatively easy to do so. The jack lives under the planer when not in use. I have several tools that are similarly up on 4x4s (turret milling machine, a PM 72, and a few others).

    Another option, though much pricier, is to get a pair of Rol-a-Lifts. I got a pair from a company going out of business for a song and they make moving the most awkward things relatively easy:

    https://rolalift.com/
    Last edited by Brian Backner; 01-02-2022 at 12:02 PM.

  8. #8
    I designed and had fabricated a mobile base for my 1953 Northfield 12" Jointer, which I am sure weights well over 1000 lbs. I build a full size mock up out of framing lumber, milling the lumber down to the exact size of the square steel tubing I wanted to use and using 1/4", 3/8", and 1/2" plywood for the steel plate. Rather than mess with cheap Harbor Freight casters in this case, I bought the bullet and purchased them from McMaster-Carr. I took to the mock up to a local welder and had it duplicated in steel. For under $500, I have a base that is as solid as a boat trailer and a jointer that is almost as easy to maneuver as my router table, which is on an off the shelf generic mobile base.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    7,229
    I would make a base out of angle iron, bolted at the joints. Then, if it needs to be done, you can take it to a welder who can tack the joints solid.
    Bill D

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,144
    Pallet jack..

    As for space just keep it under one of the machines. It's way more convenient and easier to move.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    97
    Others have replied here about using a pallet jack, which is the way I went. Apparently many folks don't realize that there are some models that move in two directions, such as the one I purchased:

    https://www.uline.com/Product/Detail...l-Pallet-Truck

    Can save a lot maneuvering in tight spaces.

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