Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 25 of 25

Thread: My most extravagant shop purchase, for a hobbyist

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis
    Posts
    760
    I got whatever brand hobby lobby sells. Brian

  2. #17
    I have the bigger brother ($350 model) and found it useful until I overloaded it. It now leaks down rather quickly. I would like to find a source for parts to rebuild the cylinder but haven’t found anything. A hydraulics repair shop in Atlanta did not even want to look at it without specs and parts. If anybody has any parts information, I would hear it so I could to fix mine. The leaking problem is common and should be fixable.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Falls Church, VA
    Posts
    2,067
    Blog Entries
    1
    Hmmmm…y’all got me to thinking. I have two young grandsons and I struggle to elevate to just the right height for the drill press etc. I see that this table has brakes. Would it serve as a work platform?

    I would have to shorten the handle. The best home would be under the table saw outfeed.

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Potter View Post
    Phillip,

    What brand/model is the blue one you picture, and where did you get it? How big is the table?

    Thanks,

    Rick
    Rick,

    The blue lift is a Bishamon LX100WBI that is rated for 1000kg (2200 lbs.) This particular one is a super low profile lift and was originally made to sit on the floor and lower down to a height of 3” off the floor. My current needs are not that so I have modified it with the LVLs and casters underneath as well as the MDF torsion box top that is bolted to the steel table. The pump and motor of the low profile lifts like these does not originally mount under the lift and has about an 8’ tail of hose/cable and presumably is bolted somewhere close by, but I have also modified mine with an open plywood “cradle” of sorts under the lift that houses the motor and pump and manages the cords and hose better than being independent mounted. Many of the other scissor lifts that aren’t super low profile have all this factory mounted underneath, but I have found that they command a bit higher price typically.

    Table size is 35”x51” on this one, but there are all types of configurations you will find on these industrial scissor lifts. My torsion box has a top that is 40” x 75” which is nice size for most things short of passage and entry doors as far as assembly space.

    I found this one used on FB marketplace of all places after looking for the right deal and size of scissor lift for the last year or 2. This one is 220v single phase for the pump motor; I’d say 9/10 you see for sale are 3 phase which adds additional cost for a small VFD if you don’t have 3 phase. I paid $500 for this lift and am beyond thrilled with that price as it is around $4k new for this particular lift and many others are in a similar range (new.) Most used scissor lifts I saw after looking for a few years were in the $1-2.5k range depending on dealer vs private party vs auction.

    I would get another one in a second if a good deal popped up. Hope this helps.
    Last edited by Phillip Mitchell; 01-05-2022 at 10:23 AM.
    Still waters run deep.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    1,073
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Feeley View Post
    Hmmmm…y’all got me to thinking. I have two young grandsons and I struggle to elevate to just the right height for the drill press etc. I see that this table has brakes. Would it serve as a work platform?

    I would have to shorten the handle. The best home would be under the table saw outfeed.
    Roger - that's just about exactly what I do with some of mine. I've got a radial drill press on one, and several others with belt sanders. I adjust the height to suite me, then place blocks under the scissor mechanism to keep it from moving when the cylinder eventually leaks down. I've also got my baby drum sander mounted to one. In addition to setting the right height for comfortable use, they also have the portability factor plus the wheel locks.
    David

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Falls Church, VA
    Posts
    2,067
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by David Buchhauser View Post
    Roger - that's just about exactly what I do with some of mine. I've got a radial drill press on one, and several others with belt sanders. I adjust the height to suite me, then place blocks under the scissor mechanism to keep it from moving when the cylinder eventually leaks down. I've also got my baby drum sander mounted to one. In addition to setting the right height for comfortable use, they also have the portability factor plus the wheel locks.
    David
    im thinking about elevating a 4 year old. Do the wheel locks work well enough?

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    1,073
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Feeley View Post
    im thinking about elevating a 4 year old. Do the wheel locks work well enough?

    I think that depends on which model you purchase. I got mine from Grizzly, but they have discontinued them. But yes - the wheel locks on mine work fine.
    David

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Upland CA
    Posts
    5,125
    Thanks Phillip. I like the way you set yours up. Very useful.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  9. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I'm a big fan of adjustable height work surfaces in the shop...that shouldn't come as a surprise since I've probably mentioned it about ten billion times over the years. LOL. Why strain one's back or have to lie on the floor to do something when there are solutions to remove those challenges?
    Man you couldn't be MORE correct....one of two big mistakes when I built my shop. I was clueless.....I put 2 of my 3 tables on wheels, but all 3 are diff height. It would be nice to wheel one table over to another and slide material over. I try to wheel heavier material around on the highest table so it can be slid down rather than lifted, but that doesn't always work out. As I age correcting this is moving up on my shop's to do list. My other mistake was electrical but that's another story.
    Thanks,
    Fred

    Seasoned professional possessing unremarkable proficiency at innumerable skills.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    7,231
    Just picked mine up this morning. It looks good to me. It has a factory foot brake at the handle end. Bolted to the frame. man it is heavy.
    Bill D.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •