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Thread: Sharpening: hand or wheel

  1. #46
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    Columbus, Ohio, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Buresh View Post
    Flattening the back is not for the purpose of registration. That thousandth of an inch won't be noticable while paring.

    The back needs to be flat to be honed properly. If there is a hollow at the cutting edge only the edges of the edge will get sharp. You need a flat surface to get an even edge.

    It is also plausible that the old timers did something similar to the ruler trick, and maybe put a shaving or something under the chisel back so they are only polishing the cutting edge instead of taking the time to polish the back.
    Thank you Jason! If you do not flatten the back, you probably will not get it sharp UNLESS you add a back-bevel to the chisel. This is also why you do not need the entire back to be flat.

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
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    Something for Andrew to drool over....
    Bench Chisels, normal sized.JPG
    Throw a couple "Bigs", too....
    Bench Chisels, and the bigs.JPG

    Shop is an E.O.E.
    A Planer? I'm the Planer, and this is what I use

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio, USA
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    You are a bad bad man Stevn!

    That is a lot of chisels. Very nice indeed.

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
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    Got them all put back in the rack...
    Top of the bench, needs cleaned up.JPG
    For now...
    A Planer? I'm the Planer, and this is what I use

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    Columbus, Ohio, USA
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    Nice. I really like your storage...

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Colorado Springs
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    342
    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Winners View Post
    One other thing that Derek was getting at and hopefully someone said straight out. It doesn't matter what grit you sharpen to. What matters is the surface of the wood after you are done. I am "happy enough" with the surfaces I get sharpening to 4000 grit diamond, no stropping, and occasionally sanding with 220 grit or pulling out a card scraper. But I finish, mostly, with oil and waxes.

    You certainly may sharpen to 30k grit on water stones if it is important to you, and it may be important to you. What matters is not the grit you sharpen to, but the surface your tools leave behind. If you are dead set on clear film finishes like shellac or polyurethane or varnish 4k may not be sharp enough. You may need to use isopropyl or acetone to lift dust out of wood pores before you apply finish. If you are going to paint a thing, you may very well find sharpening to 600 grit is more than adequate. Learn to adjust your chipbreakers so they are as close as possible to the edges on your plane irons.

    One of the users here has a sig line "sharp solves all manner of problems" and I agree, but sharp in not enough to cover fundamentals. If your fundamentals are good, sharp does indeed solve all manner of problems.

    Good luck and best wishes.
    Scott, Iím not sure Iíve ever seen a resolution burned with a consecutive post before! 😀😃

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