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Thread: Sanding drum for a shaper (any options besides Amana and Felder?)

  1. #1

    Sanding drum for a shaper (any options besides Amana and Felder?)

    Looking to get a sanding drum for my shaper (1.25" spindle).

    Amana makes a 60mm diameter version ($125), but it's not clear to me how easy the paper is to load.

    Felder sells the "Schleiffix" in 45, 60, and 80mm diameters, but only to fit a 30mm spindle. 30mm spindle is $270...

    It looks like the Schleiffix is maybe sourced from Braun, who makes a 1.25" bore version, but only place I can find it is Scott and Sargeant for $300...

    Are there any other options to consider? Anyone have the Amana 61293?

  2. #2
    I just got the Amana as a Christmas gift, I also have a 1.25" spindle The paper is trivially easy to load The drum has a top and a bottom, the top simply unscrews, and the act of unscrewing loosens the pressure on the paper and the paper is easily removed and replaced. There is a vertical slit in the drum, the paper begins and ends in that vertical slit Tightening the top clamps that vertical slit shut on the paper, holding it securely.

    You can use any brand/grit of paper you want, or Amana sells 80 grit replacements.

  3. #3
    Thanks, Ed - I had read one post on here (from years ago) that mentioned something about the paper being proprietary or hard to load, but I'm glad to hear that's not the case. Thanks!

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Modesto, CA, USA
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    Seems to me the rpm would be way to fast unless you have a vfd on the motor. What is your minimum rpm at the spindle.
    Bill D.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
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    Cambridge Vermont
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    I have to agree with Bill. Spindle speed seems like it would be too fast. Unless you don't have room in your shop I would look for a oscillating spindle sander. For years I resisted because I wanted an old iron one. But after seeing many that were missing spindles (that are no longer made) I gave up and got a Grizzly. It was a great purchase and I use it a lot more than expected. To me putting sand paper on a shaper is kind of like buying one of those flat discs for a tablesaw that you can put sandpaper on. Just seems like a solution that's not going to leave you frustrated. However I would love to hear about what you think if you do try it.

  6. #6
    Good point - mine will do 3,000 RPM. I found some older posts where folks had good results at this speed.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Friedrichs View Post
    Good point - mine will do 3,000 RPM. I found some older posts where folks had good results at this speed.
    You need to consider surface speed on the drum, not rpm. A drill press is a much better option. Especially at finer grits.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    Phoenix AZ Area
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    Before I got a spindle sander I used a drum in the drill press, actually over the years I probably bought and tried 3 different ones. With the drill press I could slow down but because there is no oscillation, the paper quickly loads and burns. The sleeves were always shot very quickly and not cheap. I think you'd run into the same issue with the shaper, but I've never tried one in my shaper.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Friedrichs View Post
    Good point - mine will do 3,000 RPM. I found some older posts where folks had good results at this speed.
    I use the Schlefix drum in my shaper at 3,000 RPM…….regards, Rod

  10. #10
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    Feb 2009
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    Cedar Park, TX - Boulder Creek, CA
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    I have the small one from Felder. Used it a couple times. Works ok, but you gotta be gentle with it, and adjust the height to get a fresh surface.

    For regular use, an oscillating spindle sander, or at least an oscillating belt sander with a spindle attachment, would be a much better choice.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
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    Moscow, ID
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    265
    I used a drum in my drill press to sand on a project a few years ago. It was painfully slow and did not do a very good job. I ended up hand sanding most of the edges.

    I recently set up my Rigid oscillating belt/spindle sander and used it on a shelf project built out of maple. That machine worked great - both the belt and the spindle did a great job sanding the curves on my edges (5/4 maple). It was easily worth the $200 I spent on it just for this project, and I know it will be useful on many more projects in the future.

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