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Thread: Diamond Abrasive Lapping Fluid

  1. #1

    Diamond Abrasive Lapping Fluid

    Diamond lapping fluid is basically water soluble coolant. It is coolant that is mixed with water and it gives the water some added features. But some of the problems with it is it get stronger as the water evaporates and it needs to be tested often. Other problems that can arise are coolant allergies that develop over time. The the major problem is a residue is left behind and that will cling to a surface in the form of a with a film. and that will need to be cleaned off before the surface can be used again.

    To get to the point is can be a sticky mess that needs to be cleaned with water and a brush, and it takes time to dissolve. And the finer the grit easier the easier it is for the coolant to load up around the diamonds.

    People think they need it because one of the selling points is it stops the metal from rusting. And it will do that. but the mess left over from repeated use gets harder and harder to clean off.

    Just plain water is a better lapping medium. The plate can be cleaned very easily with water after use and after wiping it down with a clean paper towel, I finish it off with a hot air gun or a hair drier. Water can't cause rusting where there it no water

    The coolant cost $13 for a 3.4 once bottle and will be gone shortly. My Wagner hot air gun was about $30 and I have been using it for lots of different purposes for over the last 5 years. I use it to dry my diamond lapping plate and in that frame no hint of rust.

    You can run out of the lapping fluid but water should always be available.
    Last edited by Tom Bussey; 12-24-2021 at 5:02 PM.
    Tom

  2. #2
    An after though is your wife's hair drier will also work very well. Just don't tell her if you want to keep on living. I guarantee you she will have no since of humor.
    Tom

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    8,399
    Thanks Tom

    I have always used the same lubricant for my waterstones - water plus a little liquid soap. I am fortunate to have running water in the workshop, and so just rinse and stack the diamond stones to drip-dry after use. Never had an issue with rust - if there is anything like this, it is the swarf that was not cleaned away at the start.

    Merry Christmas all.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    1,982
    Thanks Tom. I’ve thought of buying that stuff at times. I’ve been using diamonds since they came out in the 70s and have used windex and water. I dry them carefully and brush with a stiff fiber brush, no plastic. I’ve been successful so far. I won’t be wasting money on that fluid.
    Jim

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    485
    The sds for the trend stuff looks like naphtha and hydro treated petroleum distillates

    If you are worried about rust some edta in water should work (probably evaporust as a lapping fluid would work)

    Probably best and easiest is water with a little soap, and dry the tool when done

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    6,663
    I keep a button start Propane torch on the sharpening sink. It waves water right off the tool.

  7. #7
    A propane torch is a great idea.
    Tom

  8. #8
    I just use windex. Can't cause rust and it evaporates off all on its own.

  9. #9
    Chris,

    I am not disagreeing with you at all. Nickel does not rust so any rusting that goes on is the grit removed form the object being sharpened. I wrote this because there are a lot of people who hater spending maybe $100 don't want anything to happen to it and therefore fooled into thinking they need to spend another $15 for the fluid. Great marketing though, I also posted this on a different forum and it seems that Windex as ammonia in it which brakes down the Nickel bond. So according to him Windex is a no no.
    Tom

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    1,982
    I have 2 DMT stones from the mid 1970s when they first came out I think. They both still work. They are not as aggressive as they were but are still very useful. I have always used windex. The nickel is still there, discolored some. I have an extra extra fine, a extra fine and course plates that are my “new ones” at least 10 years old. Same thing windex and they look and work ok. I never leave them wet and rinse with water after use.
    Jim

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    485
    Quote Originally Posted by chris carter View Post
    I just use windex. Can't cause rust and it evaporates off all on its own.
    You sure about windex not causing rust?

    It’s a dilute aqueous solution of ammonium hydroxide (with probably added surfactants). Not sure chemically why that would not rust the iron in the tools.

  12. #12
    Hasn't caused any rust on my tools or diamond plates over the last 2 years

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2021
    Location
    Portland, Oregeon
    Posts
    11
    I've watched some videos that recommend automotive window cleaner. They claim that there is no amonia in it and has some ingredients that inhibit rust. Good info or bad? I personally don't know. My diamond stone recommend "Krud Cutter" as a lubricant. Any thoughts on that product? I ordered some of the Trend stuff. Perhaps I was suckerered, but it was only $15. I thought of it a small investment to protect the investment of the diamond stones.

  14. #14
    Paul sellers has been using automotive window cleaner for years. He swears by it. I use no name windex. Rob Cosman uses water and honerite mix. Some use water. Some use wd40. Some use simple green. If your diamond stones recommend krud cutter id give that a try. Up here 100ml of trend lapping fluid is 28 bucks, a gallon of krud cutter is the same. You might be surprised how quickly you run through that lapping fluid depending on how often you sharpen.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by John Stankus View Post
    You sure about windex not causing rust?

    It’s a dilute aqueous solution of ammonium hydroxide (with probably added surfactants). Not sure chemically why that would not rust the iron in the tools.
    It does not react with iron or steel. So no, it will not cause rust.

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