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Thread: Under sink water filter and drinking water faucet

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
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    Minnesota
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    443

    Under sink water filter and drinking water faucet

    I am replacing my current kitchen faucet with a pull out. The existing is a faucet with a separate sprayer. Rather than plugging the sprayer hole or doing the soap dispenser thing, I like the idea of adding a separate drinking water faucet. I drink our tap water and it's fine for me, but my wife hates it. Our current fridge does not have water/ice in the door, so it requires opening the fridge and awkwardly bending over to push a stupid little button.
    (Since the universe is a comedian I fully expect the fridge to fail a week after I do this.)

    Anyway, does anyone have a recommendation for a filter/faucet combo they like?
    Or, maybe more importantly, am I asking for trouble with these options at lower price points?

    Thanks!

    This is the one I'm eyeballing now:
    https://www.lowes.com/pd/A-O-Smith-C...B&gclsrc=aw.ds

  2. #2
    Our tap water is Ok during cold months, but in the summer not so much. We have a Britta piture with a replacable filter. Water is fine from the Britta for drinking water. That is if the wife is ok with it...............................

  3. #3
    We have used this Rainfresh model for years and it works well. I change the ceramic filter once a year and the charcoal one every 6 months..

    Filter2.jpg Filter1.jpg

  4. #4
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    Just make sure the filters are readily available from more than one source.
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USN(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Montfort, Wi.
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    I'm curious if these units are reverse osmosis or limited filtration? We have our own well and live in a rural dairy farm area where cows outnumber people. We have high nitrates in our water so have a reverse osmosis unit installed for drinking water. It was installed in 2014 so I'm thinking it might be time for a change out. As mentioned filters are pricey and need to be changed every six months with a sanitation flush done yearly. Neither my wife are good on ladders (it's in the basement under the kitchen) or crawling around on our knees under the sink so we may have to have our plumber install and service a new unit. The cost of aging and still living in a big house with 5 acres of woodlot to care for.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Norristown, Pa
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    239
    I put my filters in the basement, and ran a plastic line to the sink, makes it much easier to change the filters than getting under the sink as we age.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    NE OH
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Fritz View Post
    I'm curious if these units are reverse osmosis or limited filtration?
    You can get both types. But decent R/O units usually have a storage tank since the production rate of small units is slow, and that tank takes up quite a bit of room under a sink.

    I just ordered a 3MRO501-01 R/O system with booster pump. It will go in the basement and connect to plumbing I put in place while doing the kitchen remodel. The booster pump improves production rate and delivered pressure when your water supply pressure is on the low side, below 50 PSI, as it often is on well systems such as ours.

    Many of the undersink filters have (to me) painfully low flow rates. No big issue if you are just getting a cup or two of water, but tedious if you are filling a pot. But if you're on city water with good pressure it's less of an issue. But when shopping for a filter, R/O or not, it's wise to check the flow rate/vs pressure ratings, remembering that they go down as the filters get clogged.
    --Certainty is the refuge of a small mind--

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Northern Florida
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    459
    Buy a generic filter housing (or two of them) and your choice of filter cartridges and put it in line with the cold water to the sink. That won't solve your problem of filling the empty hole in the sink but it will give you a lot more choices for a lot less money and it's more convenient. There's a ton of them. Some examples:

    https://www.amazon.com/Pentek-10-Standard-Housing-Pressure/dp/B003VT7ERY/ref=sr_1_9
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B086WRLZPY...mobile_desktop
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B074FW96PG...pa_dk_detail_4
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01GSFTC7M...pa_dk_detail_9

    Note that you need a carbon filter to improve the taste. If that's the issue, I'd put a sediment filter in front of it.

    If you really want a separate drinking water tap, just find a faucet you like and T off the output from the filters to both faucets.
    Last edited by Alan Rutherford; 12-21-2021 at 8:27 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    The Hartland of Michigan
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    7,536
    Instead of going with just a filter under the sink, we went with a whole house iron filter.
    I tapped into the line after the IF and before the softener and ran a line from there to a faucet on the sink.
    The IF works so well, I have considered shutting down the softener, and no longer use a filter for the system.
    Never, under any circumstances, consume a laxative and sleeping pill, on the same night

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    Just make sure the filters are readily available from more than one source.

    This was my first thought.
    When I changed mine, I went with an APEC water systems model. Them are sold at amazon and you can get the filters there as well. You can also set up the filters for automatic delivery every few months or whatever you prefer.
    Just one option

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Minnesota
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    Appreciate all the replies. Gives me plenty to think about.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
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    7,204
    Pex pipe is cheap and easy. I agree locate the filter above the laundry tray and run a small pex tube to the special faucet.
    Bill D.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    Falls Church, VA
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    While you are messing around, consider a pump dispenser for hand soap or dishwashing soap. We have a single hole faucet mounted in a granite top. Initially we just had the dish soap dispenser. Later, we had another hole drilled and put in another dispenser on the other side for hand soap. It makes for a cleaner countertop.

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