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Thread: Setting up new workshop: what other tools for CNC-centric hobby shop

  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by eugene thomas View Post
    get 5 x 8 cnc. will save shop space.
    Embracing the blocked overhead door on the left side, and switched to 4x8 Avid Pro. With the outrigger off the sliding saw or the slider moved up to the top there is a decent size space in the center to work with a mobile bench or lifting table. Wondering if a smaller rip capacity on the slider is worth it given the 4x8 CNC present?

    layout.jpg

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason McCray View Post
    Embracing the blocked overhead door on the left side, and switched to 4x8 Avid Pro. With the outrigger off the sliding saw or the slider moved up to the top there is a decent size space in the center to work with a mobile bench or lifting table. Wondering if a smaller rip capacity on the slider is worth it given the 4x8 CNC present?

    layout.jpg

    Where are your workbenches and storage? Where will you finish projects? I don't see that space as large enough for all those machines plus those other needs. If you have a jointer you don't need a slider, as nice as it might be. A TS would take up less than half the space. As others have said, something's got to go.

    John

  3. #18
    Just an observation: I would be very careful about placing a CNC router (especially one with a bolted-together aluminum frame) near any open bay door for the reason that direct sunlight or even the difference between outdoor and shop temp could cause the frame and ergo, gantry, to move out of level. I only mention this because I watch how much work our techs go through when they are installing one of our routers.

    Erik
    Ex-SCM and Felder rep

  4. #19
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    Excellent point Eric. Back in my corporate R&D days I was amazed to see how much aluminum expands/contracts vs. temperature. I remember having a 2" round bar of it in one of our mechanical test machines with just a few pounds of force applied. I grabbed it with my hand and you could see the load climb dramatically, and quickly. Take your hand off and the load went back down though not quite as fast. Aluminum is great stuff - as long as the temperature stays constant or all changes together. If there is differential heating/cooling applied something's going to twist, warp, etc.

    I plan to mount my machine on a plywood torsion box top sitting on wooden base cabinets.

    John

  5. #20
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    You could ditch the slider and get a good track saw. That would cover you with ply. J/p and bandsaw could handle hardwood prep to get it on the cnc.

    I would also say a large assembly bench would be nice to have especially if you go track saw.

  6. #21
    Even a track saw like a Mafell is never going to compete with the versatility of a decent used slider. The setup and takedown/speed alone is the killer.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Yetka View Post
    You could ditch the slider and get a good track saw. That would cover you with ply. J/p and bandsaw could handle hardwood prep to get it on the cnc.
    I actually tried to do that when I moved into my temporary shop. But alas, too much of what I do really did need a table saw. I prefer a slider and will get back to that once I have a building up and am "making do" with a cabinet saw that I was able to squeeze in for the moment. I love my track saw a whole bunch and use it a whole bunch in my current situation, But it's not the best for solid stock. Don't assume that the CNC is going to just be focused on sheet goods, either. Most of what I cut with mine is solid material.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #23
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    I think you really need to decide on what you are going to do. For me I don't touch plywood so that means gluing up panels. I'll face them on the CNC and could ditch the planer if space was an issue. But the jointer I couldn't get rid of. If plywood is what you will mainly be using then the slider (or table saw and tables or track saw) is a must. Even with hardwood I would rather a slider than a table saw. I don't have a large CNC but I think I might ditch the shaper and use the CNC instead. I've made a few raised panels with my set up and found it's much nicer as you can easily set the speed and how much is removed on each pass. But to do it you really should get a vacuum system to hold the work down.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erik Loza View Post
    Just an observation: I would be very careful about placing a CNC router (especially one with a bolted-together aluminum frame) near any open bay door for the reason that direct sunlight or even the difference between outdoor and shop temp could cause the frame and ergo, gantry, to move out of level. I only mention this because I watch how much work our techs go through when they are installing one of our routers.

    Erik
    Any large piece of equipment will expand or contract with temp changes.

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