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Thread: Live Edge

  1. #46
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    1,003
    Some of the appeal of live edge table, when done well, is that they evoke the randomness of nature, that there is beauty in unpredictability.
    When people stick hairpin legs under a chunk of log it so predictable and lazy that it inverts any delight we might feel.

    Most live edge tables I see make me angry - any lump of wood stuck on top of a rectangle of metal. No feeling for proportion, harmony or even materials, in spite of itself.

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Lake George NY
    Posts
    157
    I agree on River tables,hairpin legs and epoxy. I think epoxy is o/k on a bar top, but thatís it. I think live edge is great
    in the right setting. I love it in rustic homes or even a special piece in a modern home. Also a solid wood live edge
    conference table can be beautiful. Here are a few pieceís I built for my very rustic home in the Adirondack mountains.
    They are built in the great camp style that is extremely popular around here. I know itís not most peopleís cup of tea,
    but everyone loves it here and are willing to pay big bucks for it.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Lake George NY
    Posts
    157
    Also donít know why,but when I attach pics they are upside down, tried everything, canít fix it!

  4. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Peek View Post
    I agree on River tables,hairpin legs and epoxy. I think epoxy is o/k on a bar top, but thatís it. I think live edge is great
    in the right setting. I love it in rustic homes or even a special piece in a modern home. Also a solid wood live edge
    conference table can be beautiful. Here are a few pieceís I built for my very rustic home in the Adirondack mountains.
    They are built in the great camp style that is extremely popular around here. I know itís not most peopleís cup of tea,
    but everyone loves it here and are willing to pay big bucks for it.
    How do you get all that stuff to stay on the tables??

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Central NC
    Posts
    157
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Gibney View Post
    Some of the appeal of live edge table, when done well, is that they evoke the randomness of nature, that there is beauty in unpredictability.
    That is what I was aiming for with this piece. I hope with some small degree of success. IMG_0369.jpg

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Lake George NY
    Posts
    157
    Quote Originally Posted by Maurice Mcmurry View Post
    Frank Lloyd Wright drew and oversaw some awesome projects. He was lousy to his workers. Larger than life personalities who shaft their workers diminish their respectability beyond repair (to me). George Nakashima appears to have been a sweet and humble guy who created lots of really attractive and valuable furniture. I have made a few live edge pieces, Please God may any of them ever have a value anything near a Nakashima!
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Todrin View Post
    That is what I was aiming for with this piece. I hope with some small degree of success. IMG_0369.jpg
    I think your piece is beautiful.

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Mequon, Wisconsin
    Posts
    374
    I was a big fan of live edge and built a number of tables, never a river table or anything with hairpin legs. I always used unique designs for my legs and butterflies. That being said I can't stomach it any longer! All the river tables, hair pin legs, epoxy etc really turned me off and I no longer want to be involved with live edge pieces. Except for a floating wall shelf here & there but no more tables.
    DJO Furniture Maker / Timberwerks Studio

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    2,113
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Hughes View Post
    I found a post of a live edge epoxy river table with hair pin legs.
    God help us
    I cant help but think this table (made of flooring material?) would look good in that kitchen with the upholstered cabinetry.

    I'll admit to using hairpins on a storage table I needed to do in a hurry.
    Hobbyist

  9. #54
    I made a ton or embarrassing live edge work over the years. I've made a ton of embarrassing 'normal edge' furniture as well. Most of the crap we make is because we don't have developed design sense and want to over-emphasize the latest little trick we learned whether it's life edge incorporation, butterfly keys, crazy figured boards, dovetails, or exposed joinery. All that stuff has its place, but it takes a lifetime to learn restraint and how to appropriately deploy it.

  10. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by Prashun Patel View Post
    I made a ton or embarrassing live edge work over the years. I've made a ton of embarrassing 'normal edge' furniture as well. Most of the crap we make is because we don't have developed design sense and want to over-emphasize the latest little trick we learned whether it's life edge incorporation, butterfly keys, crazy figured boards, dovetails, or exposed joinery. All that stuff has its place, but it takes a lifetime to learn restraint and how to appropriately deploy it.
    Good post.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  11. #56
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
    Location
    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
    Posts
    622
    I just watched The Secrets of Saint Louis a 1960's documentary. FLW gets a mention. I have been past the Wainwright building many times. Next time I will look up.

  12. #57
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    North Dana, Masachusetts
    Posts
    367
    Quote Originally Posted by Prashun Patel View Post
    I made a ton or embarrassing live edge work over the years. I've made a ton of embarrassing 'normal edge' furniture as well. Most of the crap we make is because we don't have developed design sense and want to over-emphasize the latest little trick we learned whether it's life edge incorporation, butterfly keys, crazy figured boards, dovetails, or exposed joinery. All that stuff has its place, but it takes a lifetime to learn restraint and how to appropriately deploy it.

    How about Craftsman style through tenons? I make through tenons for a living, but they are traditional and had to see. Those Gamble House ones I never understood. Like exposed dovetails in contrasting wood, or butterfly patches, the Crafstman style stuff seems to shout about the maker, more than create a feeling through geometric design.

  13. #58
    Join Date
    Nov 2021
    Location
    Columbia MO and Howard County MO
    Posts
    622
    I hope to try some through tenons. I posted about a McIntosh repair I just did. repair a broken leg on a nice sideboard

    The McIntosh leg joint is cool. This piece failed because the cross member was only dowelled. How cool would that leg joint be with a tusk tenon and peg for the cross member rather than dowels? (and thicker hardwood rather than slim Mahogany)?

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