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Thread: Standing up a new bandsaw?

  1. #1

    Standing up a new bandsaw?

    I recieved a new bandsaw, it ships in its side coated in plastic. I dont see any unboxing instructions. Am i supposed to just try to use a hoist to stand it up or is there some trick?

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Winterville, NC (eastern NC)
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    2,248
    Got any friends with strong backs? Or maybe some high school football players you could bribe with pizza? Some of the Italian made bandsaws come with a lifting hook eye on the top that could be attached with a chain hoist over the top of the ceiling joists.

  3. #3
    I would just walk it up slowly by hugging the spine of the BS. You may need to brace so it doesn’t slide back. The shipping pallet should help.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Alberta
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    2,145
    I have done this with a combination of my engine hoist and several nylon endless loop straps. Wrapped the strap around the spine as high as possible on one and had a lifting eye on another. These two were lifted alone. If you have help it is not a big deal to just tip it up slowly.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Millstone, NJ
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    680
    Break away the pallet and lift it. A lot of the weight is low and if you are only lifting from the top side you are probably only lifting 35% of total. I say this but I only had a 14suv not sure how much heavier yours may be. But the 14 was like standing up a ladder that fell over.

  6. #6
    Engine hoist. If that's a 20" or 24" machine, you will want some mechanical help.

    Erik
    Ex-SCM and Felder rep

  7. #7
    I bought an inexpensive chain hoist from HF for just this sort of thing. I use it strapped to a beam in my garage and have used it to raise/support a few of my taller machines.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA
    Posts
    959
    Getting a Minimax 16" upright was pretty easy with a buddy. It was a bit too heavy to feel confident/controlled to do it by myself.

    I'd pay attention to your structure if planning to use a chain hoist. From your other posts, you may be working in a space where this would work okay. I don't think this would be a good idea with my 1950's garage's construction.
    I have seen some people put together a beam with support just for this lift.

    Matt

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
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    7,201
    Looks like the table is already removed. never lift by the table. You will break the trunnions. Lots of old saws for sale with broken, unavailable, trunnions.
    I would cut away the crate and remove the table and any other heavy stuff not attached to the saw. If you are going to use a mobile base maybe attach that before the tilt?
    If you are going to use a hoist throw a 2x4 across several joists to spread the load then wrap a chain around the middle of the 2x4.
    Bill D
    Bill D

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    60,558
    THe nice thing about the Euro style welded steel bandsaws is that they can sit on their spine safely like in that crate and then be tilted up with a few strong friend and worst case with a winch If you remove the crating down to the pallet, free the machine attachment to the pallet and get the bottom hanging over the end of the pallet, it can be tipped up pretty easily...most of the weight is at the bottom due to the motor and base.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Looks like the table is already removed. never lift by the table. You will break the trunnions. Lots of old saws for sale with broken, unavailable, trunnions.
    I would cut away the crate and remove the table and any other heavy stuff not attached to the saw. If you are going to use a mobile base maybe attach that before the tilt?
    If you are going to use a hoist throw a 2x4 across several joists to spread the load then wrap a chain around the middle of the 2x4.
    Bill D
    Bill D
    I was about to order a mobile base, but then I thought it might be better for stability to avoid?

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    THe nice thing about the Euro style welded steel bandsaws is that they can sit on their spine safely like in that crate and then be tilted up with a few strong friend and worst case with a winch If you remove the crating down to the pallet, free the machine attachment to the pallet and get the bottom hanging over the end of the pallet, it can be tipped up pretty easily...most of the weight is at the bottom due to the motor and base.
    Thanks Jim. Also, I found the lifting hook Mike mentioned which I may use.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lewiston, Idaho
    Posts
    27,917
    I use my Little Giant ladder to lift most big tools in my shop along with a small chain hoist or a come-along. My bandsaw MM-16 shipped vertically. I lifted it off the pallet with the ladder and a small chain hoist. I assembled my PM-3520B with the ladder and a small chain hoist. I put the ladder in the A-frame configuration, a 4x4 across the top and attach the chain hoist and then use it to lift heavy things.
    Ken

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    60,558
    Quote Originally Posted by derek labian View Post
    I was about to order a mobile base, but then I thought it might be better for stability to avoid?
    For a bandsaw, if your intention is to park it and never or very rarely move it, eschew the mobile base. (same for a drill press) These tools are "more top heavy" and the more stability you give them from being directly on the floor, the better, IMHO. MY MM16 sits on the floor with the OEM johnson-bar type three point mobility kit. I've moved it maybe three times since I've owned it and one of those moves was into my new temporary shop this summer. Now if I was going to move it frequently, I'd want something easier to deal with, but still as low to the floor and hopefully with a lot of stiffness, too. You just do not want it moving even an iota when you are resawing that tall, thick piece of really expensive wood!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Cache Valley, Utah
    Posts
    1,696
    As I recall it only took three of us to stand my S540 up. Disassemble the crate (LOTS of nails), stand it up. Instead of a mobile base I built a sub base for mine I could get a pallet jack under.

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