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Thread: Chisels

  1. #16
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    Mar 2016
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    Whatever you use, make sure you know how to sharpen them.
    Even a cheap chisel works really well while it's sharp, even if ergonomics and edge retention may be a bit lacking... Though, getting them sharp can be a lot of work as they often need quite a lot of grinding to get the backs flat.

    I'd recommend getting some diamond stones and a strop... Maybe a #400 / #1000 grit diamond stone, and just a piece of old leather glued to a flat board and loaded with green compound. That will get you started, and depending on your needs, might be all you require. In time you might find you like oil or waterstones... Or if you really only occasionally use your chisels, you can just make do with sandpaper and a flat surface.

    As for what chisels to get, I'll throw my hat in for the Stanley 750 Sweetheart chisels as well. I've used both the Stanley's and Narex chisels (though not the Richter line!). Narex Chisels are also good. You should consider whether you want socket chisels or not. I like them for their strength and repairability, but you should take care because occasionally, the chisel handle will pop off which can lead to accidents. As steel is concerned, I recommend avoiding A2 -- it's too prone to chipping and doesn't take and hold an ultra fine edge all that well IMO. It's quite a bit harder to sharpen than many other steels and imparts little benefit.

  2. #17
    Plus one on the Harbor Freight chisels. They seem to hold an edge. They also make great scrapers for those hard to get at places. At $10 for six chisels, buy a couple of sets. I like to use them to cut semi hardened glue off from glue ups.

    But you asked about a reasonably priced, but good quality brand and Narex makes some good chisels in different price ranges. If I were a manufacturer I would use the same steel in all of my chisels. The fit and finish is what adds cost. I would go to your wood working store or Amazon and find one that attracts you and buy it. Try it out and see how you like i. If it trips your trigger buy the other sizes you want. Don't let metric verses imperial sizes bother you. 99% of the time it makes no difference if it is a 1/2 (.5000) or a 12 MM ( .472) size
    Tom

  3. #18
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  4. #19
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    Jul 2019
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    I think the more important thing here is what do you have for a sharpening set up? Buying higher quality chisels won't do you any good if you don't have the tools to get them sharp.

    You didn't mention what you don't like about your Stanley chisels. Are they not comfortable? Don't cut right? Don't hold an edge? Some of these issues may not necessarily be the chisel.
    Always put the crappy side against the wall

  5. #20
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    After sending the OP a PM about the chisels in the SMC Classifieds he informed me he has already ordered a set from LV.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  6. #21
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    I guess that means my 2 sets of Aldi's chisels are safe?
    A Planer? I'm the Planer, and this is what I use

  7. #22
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    Brian, IMG_20211208_160917486.jpgcheck your visitor messages.

  8. #23
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    A set of wooden handled socket chisels, by Irwin/Marples popped up when I went to Amazon last night. I had never seen them before, but they should be worth a look. The come in a leather roll, and I think it was about 20 bucks per chisel.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom M King View Post
    A set of wooden handled socket chisels, by Irwin/Marples popped up when I went to Amazon last night. I had never seen them before, but they should be worth a look. The come in a leather roll, and I think it was about 20 bucks per chisel.
    Interesting to compare with the Stanley SW chisels:

    Irwin:Marples Stanley Chisels.jpg

    Not only are both sets country of origin listed as United Kingdom, look at the part number below the company name.

    Also from searching > are irwin/marples and stanley same company < this was found:

    Irwin Industrial Tools is an American manufacturer and distributor of hand tools and power tool accessories. It is owned by Stanley Black & Decker.
    It would be interesting to compare the two sets in the flesh.

    Poking around Amazon there was also some pretty inexpensive sets of chisels. One 6 piece set looks an awful lot like Aldi's for under $20.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  10. #25
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    Interesting that it seems they have different tapers to the blade thickness.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom M King View Post
    Interesting that it seems they have different tapers to the blade thickness.
    It would be interesting to compare the two sets.

    It wouldn't surprise me if they are made in different factories or the same factory.

    The different tapers on the edge bevels slipped by me.

    Haven't had my breakfast or coffee yet.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  12. #27
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    I would guess they come from the same stock. I like the 750s. Iíve had some since they were first offered. I like the feel, balance, of them. The steel works for me. It holds an edge ok for me. I strop out of habit so probably canít speak longevity but it doesn't seem to chip at 20* I use for paring or 25* for bench use. I have seriously thought of buying another set to grind to 1/16 sizes. Yes I do use 1/16 by using metric or grinding old chisels to size. The feel is 75% for me. Keeping a sharp edge is no big deal. Yes I bought LNís too. Wouldnít work at low angles for me. Beautifully done tool but gave them away.
    Jim

  13. #28
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    Probably kind of like the box store riding lawnmower factory someone told me about in Georgia. One week they assemble Husqvarna's, the next week John Deere's, and the next week Craftsman's.

  14. #29
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    Jan 2007
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    Michiana
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom M King View Post
    Probably kind of like the box store riding lawnmower factory someone told me about in Georgia. One week they assemble Husqvarna's, the next week John Deere's, and the next week Craftsman's.
    Or MTD in Ohio. They make Cub Cadet, Troy-Bilt, Rover, WOLF-Garten, Remington, Yard Machines, Columbia, Robomow, and MTD Genuine Parts.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  15. #30
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    Aug 2019
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    Same steel, same handle shape, hornbeam wood.

    The Irwin set is hardened to 58 Rockwell level, perhaps on the soft side.

    I'd rather get a few Ashley Isles chisel.

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