Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 74

Thread: Chisels

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis
    Posts
    760

    Chisels

    I do most of my woodworking with power tools, but from time to time I need a chisel to clean something up etc... I've been using some cheap throw away Stanley chisels and thought it would be nice to have a set of maybe 3 pieces 1/2, 3/4, & 1" sizes.

    Looking for opinions of a reasonably priced, but good quality brand for this type of function.
    Thanks.
    Brian
    Brian

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    24,888
    Blog Entries
    1
    Brian, you have a lot from which to choose.

    On the inexpensive end there are Lee Valley Butt chisels at $52 for the 3 piece set you describe > https://www.leevalley.com/en-us/shop...s?item=44S0220 < These and their bevel edged chisels at a little more are plastic handled.

    A similar set of Narex chisels > https://www.leevalley.com/en-us/shop...s?item=10S0976 < with wood handles is actually a little less with four chisels, it includes a 1/4" size.

    Either of those would likely serve quite well for a mostly power tool woodworker.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #3
    Narex Richter is currently widely seen as the best value in western chisels.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    24,888
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Assaf Oppenheimer View Post
    Narex Richter is currently widely seen as the best value in western chisels.
    The three piece set, the OP mentioned, is about $130 and currently out of stock at Lee Valley and a few other vendors.

    My tendency would be to buy vintage chisels via ebay and rehab them. Not everyone's cup of meat.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    518
    I read something interesting in one of Patrick Leachís monthly tool listings. He claims unequivocally that the steel used in the Stanley #60ís was better than the 720s & 750s. To be sure heís a salesman, but not a bull*****er. I have a set of LN chisels and a bunch of my dadís plastic handle Stanley #60s and Buck Bros. #100s from the 1950s and I can attest that their quality is very close to the LNs, although not nearly as pretty. They hone razor sharp and hold an edge for a long time.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    24,888
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Rosenthal View Post
    I read something interesting in one of Patrick Leach’s monthly tool listings. He claims unequivocally that the steel used in the Stanley #60’s was better than the 720s & 750s. To be sure he’s a salesman, but not a bull*****er. I have a set of LN chisels and a bunch of my dad’s plastic handle Stanley #60s and Buck Bros. #100s from the 1950s and I can attest that their quality is very close to the LNs, although not nearly as pretty. They hone razor sharp and hold an edge for a long time.
    IMO, Stanley made the #60s to stand up to the abuse they would receive from people in various building trades.

    Here is an old thread on the #60s > https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?230951

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    6,633
    I only need one no. 60 butt chisel, for it's intended purpose- the top, and bottom hinge mortises on a door jamb where a longer chisel just doesn't work. That's why they're called Butt chisels-for hinge butts.

    My favorite plastic handled Stanley chisels are the black plastic handled no. 40. They're regular length chisels, instead of like the shorter No. 60's. I have some I bought new in the 1970's, and some others I've picked off ebay when they went for less than what they typically go for, which is real money. I keep a couple at 18 degrees for paring use, and use on window sash. I can get them as sharp as any cutting edge I have, and for my work, the edge lasts plenty good enough. They are better than the old wooden handled Stanley chisels. I always thought they didn't get the attention they deserve because of the plastic handles.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Big Bend/Panhandle, FL
    Posts
    100
    You canít wrong following Jim and Tomís advice. +1 on the Narex Richter line. Really good chisels. I have a couple and both take a great edge. My favorite is one that I picked up from a one man shop in Michigan. Check out the chisels that Andrew Kimmons (Kimmonshandtools) is making and selling via Etsy. A little more spendy than the Richter but on par with LV. No affiliation with the maker, I just like the chisels that he makes.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    427
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Runau View Post
    I do most of my woodworking with power tools, but from time to time I need a chisel to clean something up etc... I've been using some cheap throw away Stanley chisels and thought it would be nice to have a set of maybe 3 pieces 1/2, 3/4, & 1" sizes.

    Looking for opinions of a reasonably priced, but good quality brand for this type of function.
    Thanks.
    Brian
    These chisels are very well made and suitable for finer work. More attractive than the LV or Narex ones, at the very least.

    https://toolsforworkingwood.com/store/item/IL-100-40.XX

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    2,893
    A guy on Woodcentral was very impressed with the steel in this Harbor Freight set.
    https://www.harborfreight.com/wood-c...ood+chisel+set

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    427
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Coers View Post
    A guy on Woodcentral was very impressed with the steel in this Harbor Freight set.
    https://www.harborfreight.com/wood-c...ood+chisel+set
    Those are good chisels too and come down to less than $2 each. They can be reprofiled for finer work using a grinder and sandpaper on a block. Takes maybe 10 min per chisels. Convert them from heavy duty work to dovetail chisels in minutes.

    20210923_094254.jpg

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    10,670
    I still have a couple of those...almost 40 years old....still going strong...
    A Planer? I'm the Planer, and this is what I use

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Southeast virginia
    Posts
    25
    The reproduction Stanley 750 chisels are good for the money. I use them and have no complaints about sharpness or edge life. I also have some Narex (not Richter) and they are about the same as the 750 when it comes to the edge. The Narex are better suited to striking and they have a superior finish.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Greenville, SC
    Posts
    24
    Brian,

    It sounds like you don't use chisels very often. Maybe there is another option.

    Are your "cheap throw away Stanley chisels" sharp? I mean REALLY sharp.

    Steven C Newman mentioned the Harbor Freight chisels. Fresh out of the package they barely cut anything. They are great chisels AFTER using proper (whatever that is to you) sharpening to get that smooth ultra sharp edge that we all crave. I'm not going down the sharpening technique rabbit hole. There are dozens of threads here that explore that rabbit hole.

    I bet most "bad chisels" are not bad, just dull.

    TonyC

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Michiana
    Posts
    2,411
    I started with a set of budget price Blue Handle Irwin/Marples from when they were still made in Sheffield. They were covered in varnish and the backs were anything but flat, but after getting all that fixed I found they'll take a keen edge and it lasts.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •