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Thread: My first kumiko lamps

  1. #1

    My first kumiko lamps


  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Nicely done Robert.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    NE OH
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    Very nice when off, but when on they really shine! (Sorry, couldn't resist...but it's true). Is that rice paper behind the panels or something else?
    --Certainty is the refuge of a small mind--

  4. #4
    I like them! Would love to see a shot of them lit up in a darkened room!
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Extraordinary!

  6. #6
    I love them. Simple and complex at the same time!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Very nice, Robert. Detailed work like that really shows craftsmanship. Thanks for sharing!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
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    944
    Elegant. Thanks for sharing.
    Rustic? Well, no. That was not my intention!

  9. #9
    Those have been on my project list for years. No more--yours look sooooo good!
    Mike Null

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  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Very nice! Can you chare the corner joinery techniques you used for the main lamp "frame"? I have a couple lamps on my do list that will be similarly constructed, but with art glass inserts as opposed to Kumiko
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  11. #11
    Very nice. Kumiko is on my list to learn in 2022.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Luter View Post
    Very nice! Can you chare the corner joinery techniques you used for the main lamp "frame"? I have a couple lamps on my do list that will be similarly constructed, but with art glass inserts as opposed to Kumiko


    +1 -- Always looking for a better explanation on that joint

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Luter View Post
    Very nice! Can you chare the corner joinery techniques you used for the main lamp "frame"? I have a couple lamps on my do list that will be similarly constructed, but with art glass inserts as opposed to Kumiko
    I'm sure there are better ways, but here's how I did it:

    1. Using a tenoning jig, I first established the 1/8" thickness of the triangular part of the tenon on all pieces.

    2. Then formed the 1/4" inner tenon using tenon jig. I left app a 1/8" (one blade width) gap between it and the triangular.

    3. I made a jig to route the triangular housing in the legs. Through lots of trial and error and lots of adjustments to the jig, eventually I got it dialed in. I think I spent a total of 16 hours!!

    4. Standard mortise using power mortiser.

    In retrospect, I think I would consider doing the triangular tenon feature as an overlay, IOW a separate strip of wood attached after its glued up. That way it could be dialed into the triangular housing a give closer joint. I had some gaps in them.

    The other issue I had was I made the panels before the frame, and that was a mistake, as I played it safe and made the frames a little larger, then added a strip of frame material around the panel and planed them to fit. I also had a little issue glueing up square. I would recommend you make temporary panels to fit in the frames for glue up.

    IMG_1450.jpg

    IMG_1416.jpg

    Legs are marked up and double/triple checked.

    IMG_1424.jpg

    The setup for routing, a batten is used to clamp legs firmly into jig housing.

    IMG_1422.jpg

    A jig for trimming the triangular inlays. Cut with a saw, then pared. Again, lots of trial and error. The key was getting the stop in exactly the right position.

    IMG_1427.jpg

    IMG_1426.jpg

    The last lamp I made (the maple legs) are straight tenons. Had to do over, I would forgo the double tenon its way to complicated and the eye is caught to the kumiko and doesn't even see the frame joinery.

  14. #14
    Very nice Robert! Great problem solving skills which resulted in beautiful work.

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