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Thread: coarse sharpening stone

  1. #1
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    Feb 2021
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    coarse sharpening stone

    Hi all, my plane found the leftovers of a staple in some maple end grain and now I have a chipped edge. I am looking to buy a really coarse stone to redo the bevel.

    my stones right now are the
    Atoma 400 (I use it for flattening the ceramics)
    Shapton pro 1000, 5000, 12000
    DMT Dia-Sharp fine, x-fine, xxfine ( I use those mainly for edges that would gouge the ceramics - my Shapton's are my workhorses)

    I am trying to decide between a Shapton pro 120 DMT xxcoarse (120 mesh) and Atom 140 (If I hear justification, I might consider a DMT Dia-flat). one of the things I was wondering is if I get the Shapton, can I use the Atoma 400 to flatten it? or will it be coarse enough to wear the Atoma out?

    eventually I will get a grinder but right now, space and cost are at a premium

    any advice would be appreciated
    Last edited by Assaf Oppenheimer; 12-08-2021 at 3:52 AM.

  2. #2
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    Sandpaper!

  3. #3
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    I use a 300 grit diamond stone (Trend) for that sort of thing. If it's really bad I use a slow speed grinder to completely restore the primary bevel.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luke Dupont View Post
    Sandpaper!
    Yes, 80 or 120 grit sandpaper will grind away damage in minutes, with or without a guide.

    A coarse crystolon stone will also deal with nicks quickly.

  5. #5
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    Before I got a grinder I used coarse wet/dry sandpaper on a piece of glass or a granite plate. It worked well.

  6. #6
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    Another voice for abrasive sheets aka sandpaper.

    The bigger the nick the coarser the paper. Most of the time my blades only need a 200-300 grit. 80 grit can make for a very rough bevel that is hard to smooth. The surface left by a 200-300 grit abrasive is easy to work smooth with a 1000 grit stone.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  7. #7
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    If you plan on eventually buying a grinder, just do it and be done with it. I have both a dry grinder (slow speed) and a Tormek.

    Although I do really like my Norton coarse crystolon stone / India Stone such as this:

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000XK5ZDY

    The biggest disadvantage to those are that you might start wondering "how do I flatten the crystolon stone" and then start spending even more money on things such as carbide crystals and glass... not that I have ever bothered to do it and I own the carbide crystals and the glass to do it.

    I use my coarse stone so infrequently for things such as plane blades (and because I own two grinders), I no longer own any coarse water stones. When it really matters, I find it easiest to use sandpaper as mentioned by others. I usually only end up doing this when flattening backs since I can do the bevel so quickly on my Tormek.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Assaf Oppenheimer View Post
    I am looking to buy a really coarse stone to redo the bevel.

    Since you asked about a stone ...

    I will second the advice re: the Norton Crystolon stone.

    https://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/N...3-P24C206.aspx

    This is a synthetic stone that has been around a long time. Use a light, non-drying oil. It is easy to load it to the point that it stops cutting.

  9. #9
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    After reading this thread, I just ordered one of these:

    https://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/T...-P1655C71.aspx

    I used to use an X coarse diamond plate, but it didn't last as long as one might think. I never liked it.

  10. #10
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    I’d give what ya already own a shot first!

    Unless they are huge chips you can get a good bit done with a 400. I agree its nice having one that doesn’t see steel, but don’t make a habit of it. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    Clamping some 220 on a piece of mdf works too.

    A grinder can be found pretty cheap on clist.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom M King View Post
    After reading this thread, I just ordered one of these:

    https://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/T...-P1655C71.aspx

    I used to use an X coarse diamond plate, but it didn't last as long as one might think. I never liked it.
    Given that I already own them, my preference is for 8x2x1 sized stones (No. JB8, Norton Part No. 61463685455, for example.) The stone you and Joe above quoted are 1/2" thick and 3" wide. I would guess they'll dish in the center and become sort of fragile as they get thinner. A combination coarse/fine stone at 2" will dish only lengthwise, one could still use them without cambering the blade.

    Single grits:

    Fine: Norton Item No. FJB8, Part No. 61463685515
    Medium: Norton Item No. MJB8, Part No. 61463685520
    Coarse: Norton Item No. CJB8, Part No. 61463685525

    Wow, they stock big ass combination stones at that site:

    11-1/2" x 2-1/2" x 1" Stone: Norton Item No. JUM3, Norton Part No. 61463685840
    12" x 2-1/2" x 1-1/2" Stone: Norton Item No. JUM4, Norton Part No. 61463685855
    Last edited by Rafael Herrera; 12-08-2021 at 3:44 PM. Reason: part numbers

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom M King View Post
    After reading this thread, I just ordered one of these:

    https://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/T...-P1655C71.aspx

    I used to use an X coarse diamond plate, but it didn't last as long as one might think. I never liked it.
    Be sure to post and let us know what you think. I noticed that stone.

    The coarse Crystolon is listed as about 120 grit. The one you just ordered is listed as 80 grit. That is a very rough / fast stone.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Pitonyak View Post
    Be sure to post and let us know what you think. I noticed that stone.

    The coarse Crystolon is listed as about 120 grit. The one you just ordered is listed as 80 grit. That is a very rough / fast stone.
    Likely with that big of diamond grit not only are they fast to cut, they are fast at diamonds chipping and wearing down.

    My favorite coarse stone:

    100_2406.jpg

    This is ~four feet long. With a pressure sensitive adhesive backed abrasive sheet it can warm my fingers when using a guide or flattening a back.

    It was purchased from a monument shop (tombstone carver) years ago for $25. One of my better sharpening stone investments.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  14. #14
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    I will post about that 80 grit stone, when I have a chance to use it. My coarse stones get used rarely. I have 120 Shapton, 300 King, 400 Sigma, and don't think I have anything else until I get to 1,000, but I have, and use so many stones that I don't even remember all of them. I start with the least coarse one necessary for the particular job. When I'm in a big planing job, 6,000 is the starting point when the iron gets sharpened. Oil stones stay in the truck.

    My chisels get used for all sorts of rough work, working on old houses, so not something the average woodworker needs. I can't grind inside those houses, because of the mess it makes. My sharpening sink has a 92" stainless drainboard, with built in sink. It always goes to the job site. Not for the garage shop either, but makes having all those stones easy to use.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    Likely with that big of diamond grit not only are they fast to cut, they are fast at diamonds chipping and wearing down.

    jtk
    It appears you're under the impression that the stones being discussed are diamond plates -- they are not. Both the Crystolon and the one Tom ordered use Silicon Carbide.

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