Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 27

Thread: homemade jointer mobile base questions

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Orwell, NY
    Posts
    846

    homemade jointer mobile base questions

    I have ordered more sets of 5" casters from Surplus Center after seeing how well the first set works on my new shop cart. I am planning to use some 3" angle iron I got at an auction years ago to make mobile bases for the table saw and 6" jointer so I can move them around in my new shop building next year. Now while I still have a 50 amp line for the welder seems like the time to do it.

    I have never had a mobile base under a jointer before and am wondering how wide it needs to be at the bottom to be safe from tipping over. The jointer is a Jet jj6csx. If I could put the casters under the corners of the current base that would seem ideal, but the caster will raise it up 6" or so, and I don't know if I should be planning to extend the width of the base. This would seem more stable against tipping but the casters would stick out right where I like to walk when using the jointer, so that would be a bit of a nuisance. If anyone has any advice I will be very grateful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Mid-Michigan
    Posts
    145
    You're going to want to use outrigger mounting to keep the wheel track wide and the jointer bed down low. Something like the Rockler Base. There are quite a few shop-made examples around too. I have the Rockler base on mine and it works well. I got it used for significantly less than $250, but I've since bought a couple more, new.

    IMG_9226.jpg

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Orwell, NY
    Posts
    846
    I should have said that aside from the convenience of being able to roll it around I would like to have the jointer bed higher anyway. I am just over 7 feet tall, so the jointer sits a bit low for me now. The outrigger idea is interesting. In the picture it looks like the casters don't stick out past the front of the machine, where you stand to use it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    6,736
    Front casters even with base. Rear casters move the fence as far back as it goes then mark that distance from the back of the base. The back casters get set that distance back from the base. probably 6-8 inches wider then the base.
    Make the base a little longer on the left end to support a chip box or dust hose
    Bill D

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Tampa Bay area
    Posts
    600
    Something else to consider is maneuverability. If your shop is tight on space like mine is four swivel casters allow the machine to be moved latterly in any direction. You would want total locking swivel casters to do this.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Ellsworth, Maine
    Posts
    1,716
    Quote Originally Posted by Zachary Hoyt View Post
    I should have said that aside from the convenience of being able to roll it around I would like to have the jointer bed higher anyway. I am just over 7 feet tall, so the jointer sits a bit low for me now. The outrigger idea is interesting. In the picture it looks like the casters don't stick out past the front of the machine, where you stand to use it.

    Holy crap, just over 7' tall!!!! I have literally never seen a 7 foot tall person in real life here in Maine. I've seen some tall people, 6'8" to 6'10" at most but 7' is another level. I'd say your jointer must be extremely low for you. I would still recommend building the wheels outboard of the base similar to the Rockler design but have the base lift your jointer up. Again, wow you're tall!!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Orwell, NY
    Posts
    846
    Thank you all for your help. Having the base wider in back makes a lot of sense, and adding a bit to the chip collecting end. The casters I have ordered are all swivel, and two of them in each set lock but the swivels don't lock. If I find this causes me problems I can always swap in more expensive casters if need be. I think on a jointer where all the effort is going one way that the casters should swivel that way and then stay, but I don't know for sure.

    I haven't seen anyone as tall as me either, but I don't get around much. I came from Maine, but when I left there I was only 6'9", at 15 years old, and 165 pounds.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    6,736
    When I raised my drill press I raised it enough so I can put coffee cans of nut/bolts/nails and old motors in the base for ballast. More weight in the base makes it less tippy. I also removed the cast iron side belt guards since it was broken and too tall to reach the belts easily anyway. It still has the cast front 180 degree pulley guard since that is also the top bearing holder.
    Bill D
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 12-06-2021 at 10:10 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Tampa Bay area
    Posts
    600
    Here is my home made jointer base made from 3X3X1/4 angle, and other sizes for the swivel offsets. This is using 4" wheels and an 850 pound 10" jointer can be moved with one hand. Had too much stuff in the way to get a picture of the entire base. I do not need the extra height so this base is made so the base is 3/4" off the floor raising the jointer only 1". A base like this would be much quicker to build by welding flat plate to the bottom of the 3X3 angle and bolting the wheels to the bottom of that plate. Raising the machine whatever the diameter of your casters are.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Orwell, NY
    Posts
    846
    That's the same size angle I have, though my jointer is far lighter. I found out tonight that the casters I have do lock both the wheel and the swivel, and I just hadn't noticed before. I'll need to get some measuring done tomorrow and start making a plan. Right now the jointer is sitting on a gravel floor, so I can't use the base out there unless I put a piece of plywood under it or something. Adding weight to the bottom is an interesting idea, I have lots of things to store and something like a crate of ebony fretboard blanks can be pretty heavy in a smallish space.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Mid-Michigan
    Posts
    145
    I'm 6'1" and if I was 11" taller I'd want the jointer bed 11" taller too. With your 5" casters I'd build a torsion base 6" high and about 40% bigger in area than the jointer cabinet for stability. Put the casters at the extreme corners. I'm not a metalworker, otherwise I'd suggest welding up steel angle.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
    Posts
    14,193
    You might consider a mini pallet jack to move machines around your shop. Probably cheaper then the cost of high quality castors when you consider how many you have to purchase. I have found it much easier to move very heavy machines on a pallet jack.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Orwell, NY
    Posts
    846
    Thank you both for the suggestions. I am 11" taller, but my arms are also longer, so I don't have to raise it as much to get the same hand height on the machine. The pallet jack idea is interesting, but I think it would be overkill for my machines since they are both under 300 pounds. The casters I bought are rated for 880 pounds per set, and cost $12 for a set. I don't know if this link is permitted, if not I hope that a moderator will come and delete it. These are the nicest casters I have had the chance to use, but perhaps my standard of comparison is low.

    https://www.surpluscenter.com/New-Ar...1-5685-SET.axd

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    59,392
    Raising the machine up is a personal preference thing so I'd not be concerned with that. What I do think is essential is that the machine, when parked...will. not. move. No shake, rattle and roll, no deflection when pushing material through, etc. This is one advantage to mobility methods that leave the machine actually on the floor when they are not engaged. So hopefully those casters have a double lock that is really solid!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #15
    I made the mobile base for my 8" Delta with a pot belly base. Mine isn't as high as I'm 6'4", less than you might need. I used 1.5" 1/8" thick wall square tubing and 5" locking wheels. Being I was doing a lot of heavy and long planks on it, I made the base as long as the infeed-outfeed tables and it's as deep as the machine including the pot belly and bolted the jointer down to the base. It rolls around easily, locks up quick and solid and eliminates the tendency for the jointer to become tippy when doing long or heavy planks. This is what I did and I'm satisfied with the results.
    Attached Images Attached Images

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •