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Thread: Options/technique for black inlay grooves

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    61,647
    I've used the technique I mentioned above for signage quite a bit, Mark...recess, seal, paint. I do agree with Mr Bolton that you may need to re-sand the top surface to insure you have a crisp line which would remove the shellac from the top, but that's easily restored if necessary for your intended finishing regimen.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    Houston, Texas area
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    Thanks Jim, I'll do a test later in the week.
    Mark McFarlane

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Issaquah, Washington
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    1,310
    Template guided router, Wenge inlays ripped to width on table saw and planed/card scraped to flush fit with a Waterlox finish. Pretty straightforward and easy.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Ottawa, ON Canada
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    I do a lot of this with my CNC router. As others have said and seal the wood. I then use Oramask or MacTac shelf paper stuck to the surface. Then route. Now you have a stuck down "stencil". You can spray the paint or brush it in. Remove the stencil and the lines are perfect.

    Here is an example FWIW.

    fawkes_2.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Grant
    Ottawa ON

  5. #20
    Another option, which I've done, albeit quite some time ago:
    Cut your grooves as planned, just lay masking tape down prior to cutting. A downcut spiral is probably best, but know I did it with a straight one with no trouble.
    Mix epoxy - medium set time, like 60-90 minute stuff to allow a bit of working time to pour/ladle/spread. Color with black dye or UTC from local paint store, and throw in a decent amount of graphite powder.
    Remove tape, sand flush, finish processes as you normally would.
    - No worries about paint bleed, as the thick epoxy doesn't wick like that, and will cure fairly rapidly
    - Graphite powder adds a little shimmer that makes it pop, if you feel that will enhance the final look.
    - Low tech, and can easily do a test sample to proof the look / establish confidence going forward on the actual piece.

    Jeff

  6. #21
    the alchohal NGR stain I said would work. It flashes instantly other stains no they would bleed into the pores and travel.

    Mark said he wanted a groove and somewhere this has morphed into inlay. Maybe that would be okay as well but he showed a photo of what he wanted.

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Roltgen View Post
    ...Graphite powder...
    The Gougeon brothers (WEST epoxy) pioneered the use of graphite powder in epoxy for simulating deck caulking in boat construction. Produces a nice matte finish after sanding.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Houston, Texas area
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    Thanks everyone for the help. Here is the procedure I settled on after testing:

    Black painted groove and plug procedure


    • Drum sand cherry at 150 grit
    • Route grooves
    • Sand inside grooves @ 320 grit using metal straight edge
    • Install plugs
      • Clamp small metal square as a horizontal mortise guide
      • Mortise holes for plugs by hand
      • Orient plug grain and glue in plugs
      • Plane and sand plugs level @ 220 grit

    • Two quick coats of SealCoat, making sure sides of grooves are coated
    • Mask/tape around grooves 'just in case' there are paint drips,...
    • Paint black acrylic in groves
    • Dry overnight
    • Drum sand all face frame pieces @ 220 grit
    • Assemble face frames
    • Orbital sand at 220
    • Reapply one coat sealcoat (to reseal wood before garnet)
    • Two coats garnet shellac
    • Two coats ARM-R-Seal satin


    And here is what it looks like. The pic doesn't include the arm-r-seal satin final coats, which should improve the results by knocking down the uneven sheen in the groove.

    IMG_6173.jpg

    There is a little extra buildup of garnet shellac around the grooves but it's not visible unless you zoom in the photo 'larger than life'.

    Now I just need a little more practice on my hand mortising for the plugs.
    Mark McFarlane

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Really excellent job, Mark!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Houston, Texas area
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    IMG_6196.jpgIMG_6197.jpg

    Thanks everyone for the help. Here is the final result. I still have a bunch of stonework to do (split face travertine) and some drawers to build for the far left cabinet.
    Last edited by mark mcfarlane; 12-28-2021 at 9:10 AM.
    Mark McFarlane

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Houston, Texas area
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    And some 'context' views

    IMG_6204.jpgcherry soffit.jpg
    Last edited by mark mcfarlane; 12-28-2021 at 9:17 AM.
    Mark McFarlane

  12. #27
    Well done.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  13. #28
    A lovely finished product.

  14. #29
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    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Wow...looks great, Mark!!!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Lebanon, TN
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    1,596
    Those turned out beautiful. Nicely done.

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