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Thread: Shop Made Template Collar Router Base Plates

  1. #1
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    Shop Made Template Collar Router Base Plates

    • I was surprised that with all the router stuff I have around that I did not have a pair of medium sized router base plates with template profiles in them.





      I mostly do template routing with my plunge bases which I prefer teardrop bases on. I didn't realize that when it came to plain round bases with step openings I had . . . none!?!
      Pull some plexiglass out of the bin and cut off a piece. Then cut that piece in half because I need two bases.





      This bandsaw template jig was made for different saw so the clamping is a little kludgy; still works.









      Leave the commercial base taped on and flush trim the bandsawn blank.





      Use the commercial plates holes as a guide for the through holes for the screws. These holes are a bit oversized to allow precision centering (later) of the template collar.





      For the counter-bores, the screw head thickness is the depth guide. That is, I drill the counter-bore deep enough so that the screw head is recessed.





      Nearly there.





      I attach each plate to the base it will be used with. I use a router and a 1/4" bit to mark the approximate center.





      Now using this hole at the drill press as an alignment aid I can drill the stepped hole for the collar.









      That's just what I needed.


    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  2. #2
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    Well done!

  3. #3
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    Well done indeed!

  4. #4
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    Nice. Tell us more about the bandsaw template jig … I’ve never seen that.
    There is a very fine line between “hobby” and “mental illness.” - Dave Barry

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bain View Post
    Nice. Tell us more about the bandsaw template jig … I’ve never seen that.

    Let me see if I did a thread on that . . . Nope. It is pretty much from ShopNotes #116. Basically you need a platform that will clamp to your bandsaw (or your bandsaw fence if the bandsaw is big enough) and support a controlled nose piece that adjusts up and down.

    BS Template Jig (1).jpg

    The article uses a blunt nose and this is good for gentle curves.

    BS Template Jig (2).jpgBS Template Jig (4).jpgBS Template Jig (3).jpg

    Here the template is on top and the blank is below.

    BS Template Jig (5).jpg

    I found a sharper nose was required for a lot of the stuff I do.

    BS Template Jig (6).jpgBS Template Jig (7).jpg

    I made the vertical rods out of an old axle from a discarded dolly. The scrap and other hardware I had around.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the tip. I also need to make some template guides for one of my plungers and this is great timing.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Wilkins View Post
    Thanks for the tip. I also need to make some template guides for one of my plungers and this is great timing.

    For one or two a 1" tall piece of scrap with a slot cut into it clamped in position could do ya
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

  8. #8
    Use the commercial plates holes as a guide for the through holes for the screws. These holes are a bit oversized to allow precision centering (later) of the template collar.

    This is the key point. Many baseplates have countersunk fasteners which prevent accurate alignment to the bit. Thanks for the post, Glenn.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Jenness View Post
    Use the commercial plates holes as a guide for the through holes for the screws. These holes are a bit oversized to allow precision centering (later) of the template collar.

    This is the key point. Many baseplates have countersunk fasteners which prevent accurate alignment to the bit. Thanks for the post, Glenn.

    Very true Kevin. The routers I had like that I quickly realized I had to convert them to counterbore if I wanted to do accurate template routing with them. Easily done if you happen to love a router that has count sunk as opposed to counter bored holes.
    Take me to the hotel - Baggage gone, oh well . . .

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