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Thread: DeWalt table saws – DWE7491RS vs DWE 7485

  1. #1

    DeWalt table saws – DWE7491RS vs DWE 7485

    I'm in the market for a table saw for, basically, just ripping lumber. I have a track saw for sheet goods, but I'm going to be building quite a few face frames in the near future, so I'd like a table saw. My budget and shop space doesn't extend to a cabinet saw, so I'm looking at the 8-1/4" and 10" DeWalt contractor saws. Does anyone have experience with the performance of either of these at ripping moderately-hard hardwood (e.g., hard maple, yellow birch)? I'm not planning on using a dado stack, cutting joinery, or pretty much anything other than ripping. Cheers.

  2. #2
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    Jobsite saws come with so many compromises that are intended to make the saw easily portable. The only reason that would compel me to get one would be if I needed to regularly move it to & from job sites. A contractor saw or used cabinet saw can be had for about the price of the 10" DeWalt & will be a much better machine.

    If all you're doing is ripping lumber, a band saw may serve you better.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Pratt View Post
    Jobsite saws come with so many compromises that are intended to make the saw easily portable. The only reason that would compel me to get one would be if I needed to regularly move it to & from job sites. A contractor saw or used cabinet saw can be had for about the price of the 10" DeWalt & will be a much better machine.

    If all you're doing is ripping lumber, a band saw may serve you better.
    Unfortunately, I'm not in an area where I can easily get a used saw (and the shipping on that would be prohibitive). I do have a bandsaw, but the prospect of ripping many long face frame components and then getting them a consistent thickness isn't all that appealing (I'd like to get this project done before the end of time...).

  4. #4
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    Get a quality think kerf ripping blade and you should be good. I made quite a few projects out of walnut using the 10" dewalt and it performed admirably for what it is.

    Note: I abused it far more - dado stacks, etc... and it held up really well.

  5. #5
    I have 3 table saws. A SCM slider, a Tannewitz Model U and a Dewalt 7491. Obviously the first 2 are not portable in the slightest so I use the Dewalt for on site / install use and it does the job. Mostly ripping is what it does. If you get a high quality thin kerf ripping blade it will do ok in hardwoods up to 1 1/2”, but be slow. You do not get a cut quality anywhere close to nicer and heavier saws but it will cut the wood, just expect to have deeper saw marks to sand/plane out for a finished edge . I don’t think I would push 8/4 hardwood through it with any regularity unless there was literally no other option, but sounds like you’re talking about mostly 4/4 stock anyway. The saw has never really impressed me, but it will get the job done as good or better as any other portable saw, though I have not tried the SS jobsite saw.

    The rack and pinion fence is probably the best fence on a job site saw that I know of (relatively speaking) but you can still flex it with too much muscle or heavy stock. The dust collection isn’t as terrible as most other job site saws as it has a blade shroud that actually helps to some degree if hooked up to dust collection. You will want an outfeed table of some kind as the table size is pretty small. I use a 4x8 assembly table on sawhorses that are sized to be exactly the same height as the Dewalt table top and it solves that problem.

    The best part about the saw is probably the wheeled frame/base it’s attached to and how easy it is to move it around. I would not want to use this saw permanently set up in a shop and would search far and wide for a decent unisaw for $500-600 with a decent fence before settling on the Dewalt for anything other than portable use, but that’s just me and I’m spoiled. Hope this helps.
    Still waters run deep.

  6. #6
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    I’ve used a Dewalt 8 1/4 contractor’s saw for some 10 years or more. Primarily for ripping. Like you, I have no room for a full size table saw. I have adjusted the table to be perpendicular to the fence and it cuts well. No problem up to 8/4 hardwood and even occasional resawing. 3/4 stock is a piece of cake. I’m primarily a hand tool user and do dress the cut sides with a hand plane…but don’t find the cut edge to be bad at all.

    For longer stock I would recommend an infeed table of some sort…and an outfeed would be nice as well. I wouldn’t hesitate to get one for what you plan to do.

  7. #7
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    8 1/4" blades aren't usually in abundance & you pretty much have to settle for what they have in stock and try to get by.
    10" blades on the other hand - can usually be found in whatever confirmation you want - without too much trouble.

    I ran into this issue with my Delta 8 1/4" compound miter saw.
    My granddad always said, :As one door closes, another opens".
    Wonderful man, terrible cabinet maker...

  8. #8
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    My apologies, folks. My saw is 10” not 8 1/4. As Rich said, blades are abundant. Tells you how much I use the thing

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyler Bancroft View Post
    I'm in the market for a table saw for, basically, just ripping lumber. I have a track saw for sheet goods, but I'm going to be building quite a few face frames in the near future, so I'd like a table saw. My budget and shop space doesn't extend to a cabinet saw, so I'm looking at the 8-1/4" and 10" DeWalt contractor saws. Does anyone have experience with the performance of either of these at ripping moderately-hard hardwood (e.g., hard maple, yellow birch)? I'm not planning on using a dado stack, cutting joinery, or pretty much anything other than ripping. Cheers.
    I used a dewalt jobsite saw for quite a while. I still have it, for softwoods and jobsite work now. Thin kerf blade helps, but it's obvious the difference in strength of a jobsite saw vs a 3hp saw. It will cut anything you throw at it, just don't expect it to be fast or to give high quality cuts.

  10. #10
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    I can't comment on the 7485, however I purchased the 7491RS to rip face frames. I also grew tired of ripping face frames with my track saw and no longer have the room for a cabinet saw. The 7491RS has been great for that purpose. I have never used the stock blade. I use Forrest full kerf blades from my old unisaw and the DeWalt spins it fine. I have only ripped 5/4 maple and walnut, however the saw did fine.

    I added a tall, long auxiliary fence that simply clamps to the OEM fence and am happy with the results. Pic below.

    Many have discussed the tradeoffs with portable job site saws and their points are valid. I was initially discouraged about the 7491RS but purchased one anyway. Glad I did. It is way more capable than many unfamiliar with this model claim.

    Rip Fence.jpg

    IMG_1824.JPG

    IMG_1823.JPG
    Last edited by Dick Mahany; 12-04-2021 at 10:16 AM.
    Dick Mahany.

  11. #11
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    Dick: That is a nice looking fence. Do you have any shop drawings on it that you would be willing to share? I just bought a DW7491RS two weeks and I'm slowly upgrading it.
    Thanks.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Betker View Post
    Dick: That is a nice looking fence. Do you have any shop drawings on it that you would be willing to share? I just bought a DW7491RS two weeks and I'm slowly upgrading it.
    Thanks.
    Sent you a PM
    Dick Mahany.

  13. #13
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    May I ask for the same please Dick?

  14. #14
    I would also love to get a copy of the drawings. That is the nicest looking auxiliary fence i have seen for these saws!

  15. #15
    I have a Dewalt jobsite 10" saw. I think it is a good saw. Like others have said it is not a bench saw, but it can do a lot especially with a sharp blade. I ripped 2X stock a lot this summer on my cottage renovation and was quite content with it.

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